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20111101-

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  • This presentation is targeted at pharmaceutical companies From the perspective of a pharma brand, two main audiences are of relevance: end consumers and physiciansHence, this presentation dwells on these two audiences and describes how Social Media is changing the healthcare industry
  • This presentation is targeted at pharmaceutical companies From the perspective of a pharma brand, two main audiences are of relevance: end consumers and physiciansHence, this presentation dwells on these two audiences and describes how Social Media is changing the healthcare industry
  • As we have been stressing for quite a while now (we have also devoted a precious training to this topic), mobile is of ever increasing importance in APAC as a communication channelThis graph illustrates the immense growth that the region has witnessed in terms of mobile phone users.In many countries within the region, mobile has a higher penetration than the internet and is hence even more important than in industialised nations.
  • Along with the growth of mobile phone users in general, mobile internet specifically is on the rise as well.This is not only impressive in terms of quantity, but also adds a layer of quality to the mobile phone category that leads to unprecedented opportunities for marketers to connect and interact with consumersApps are the youngest spawn of this development. Mobile phones have evolved from what they once were into multi-tasking entertainment machines. The healthcare industry is no exception to this: It is estimated that there were approximately 8000 health care apps for mobile operating platforms such as iOS, Android and Blackberry
  • Mobile phones unfold a whole battery of different uses in the healthcare category!From and end consumers’ perspective, these can be:Opportunities for remote treatments and diagnoses, which can critically improve healthcare conditions in remote and lesser developed regions, of which many can be found in APACSimilar to this primary care, emergency care can also be improved by mobile technology. Prevention devices can are possible just as well as GPS enabled enabled response systems that make it easier for emergency personnel to find an individualMany chronic diseases require long term management solutions, for which mobile technology can be invaluable since it decreases the disruption these diseases cause for patientsLast but not least, mobile phones and apps can offer first hand information and monitoring that gives people more freedom and independence from doctors (something that emerges as a trend in the APAC region as we will shortly see)Less of a value for end consumers than for pharma brands is the opportunity of information collection that mobile phones offer. Mobile health records, mobile surveys and hence rich databases can help pharma brands know their consumers better and tailor their service offerings as well as the communication more to the needs of their consumers
  • “The Quantified Self” is a term referring to the increasing habit of people to quantify and monitor information about their personal lifestylesThe concept isn’t necessarily new. Back in the days (and still today) nutrition tables were (are) a good example for this trend since people can track their intake of different nutritious substances such as sugar, fat, salt etcWith the emergence of digital technology (predominantly mobile) the opportunities for people to follow this habit have increased exorbitantly. Nowadays apps like Nike Plus can track how far we run, how much we sleep, how much we should weigh etc. Arguably even more important is the function of recording AND PUBLICISING of such information that these apps bring with them.Hence, a whole new level of SOCIAL HEALTH BEHAVIOUR has been reached. These tracking and monitoring apps are consciousness/awareness raising devices. Consumers are motivated to stick with a plan through healthy competition, against oneself and others. By publicizing your progress and results, you are inviting supporters into the challenge with you. You now have a commitment to a following you can’t let downPharma companies can tap into this by harnessing people’s social behaviour to help them increase their level of health.
  • Having presented mobile technology in its most cutting-edge and advanced form (GPS, apps etc), it is important not to dismiss the more basic functions of mobile phones – especially in APAC where many regions see fewer smartphones than standard mobile phones.Hence, one should not neglect the power of SMS. One example is the Indian website mDhil.com which offers In addition to its website-based information many SMS services such as basic healthcare information, access to India healthcare information SMS health text alerts and much more.Buddyworks connects doctors in remote areas to centers of expertise for real-time advice
  • This presentation is targeted at pharmaceutical companies From the perspective of a pharma brand, two main audiences are of relevance: end consumers and physiciansHence, this presentation dwells on these two audiences and describes how Social Media is changing the healthcare industry
  • The internet plays a paramount role in our developing view of healthcare since it constitutes one of the most important information sources
  • This comes in the form of general health portals,Patient-to-Patient support networks, and Physician peer networks across the globe
  • Another trend that further nurtures the growing empowerment of Asian patients is their attitude towards healthcare, which is more about sustainable wellbeing than quick-fix treatments.According to the traditional concepts of medicine and health care, Asians are more prone to a long-term oriented and sustainable attitude towards health and wellbeing than their Western counterparts. They are seeking solutions they can take into their own hands to promote healthy living over the long-term. This idea of the patient empowered by Web-based tools and information suits this demographic wellThe prevention-based and long-term oriented understanding of healthcare of Asian consumers is a good breeding ground for trusting relationships between pharma brands and consumers. In this environment, the concept of pharma brands as trusted partners can evolve as something very powerful.
  • One issue that constantly surfaces in the APAC region is trust in the healthcare sector. This trust is of utmost importance in pretty much every region of the world. In Asia, however, it’s constantly under threat by quacks, fake doctors, fake treatment regimen etc. that self-acclaimed experts market. Hence, the media is full of related news, which undermines trust in public authorities, doctors and pharma brands.This is one of the main factors that drive consumers towards the independence and self-diagnosis opportunities of the internet. This means consumers in Asia empower themselves in order to protect themselves against all the dodgy product and service offerings that swamp Asian markets.
  • On top of this, counterfeit drugs further chip away at the trust consumers have in the healthcare sectorDrug counterfeiting has increased significantly on a global scale and according to the WHO Asia enjoys the dubious honour of topping the list of reported counterfeiting cases.This means that Asians are especially prone to mistrusting everything they come across
  • One of the reasons for this development is a comparatively lesser developed state of regulatory bodies that ensure the quality and efficaciousness of drugs.It’s not that Asian countries don’t have such bodies, but it seems that they have much power to actually enforce their standards than their counterparts in the industrialised countries of this worldIn this way, it is more important than ever for Asian consumers be vigilant about their health and self-care (as well as in caring for loved ones)
  • This presentation is targeted at pharmaceutical companies From the perspective of a pharma brand, two main audiences are of relevance: end consumers and physiciansHence, this presentation dwells on these two audiences and describes how Social Media is changing the healthcare industry
  • Directly influenced by this trust-issue is the growing amount of SNS based peer support networks that people use to get information on most things in life.This graph shows that Asians place great trust in friends and family and experts. These are two things in which the influence of Social Media becomes most obvious!
  • One example for how brands can use Social Media to build trust with their consumers is Johnson and Johnson’s “Children with Diabetes”, which was originally founded and created by parents of children with diabetes and later acquired and further curated by J&J.It now a great opportunity for users to get in touch with both their peers and J&J experts. As seen on the previous slide, these two sources of influence are the most important ones for Asian consumers online.Also, such BBS based services are very popular in Asian markets. China is probably the most prominent case in point where BBS websites are still among the most popular types of SNS!!!
  • Another area in which Social Media and the internet in general plays a key role are sensitive topics that relate to issues such as STDs and other socially stigmatised diseases.The above example from China shows brutally clearly that Social Media and the internet are the most used sources of information within this area – by a margin!Again: Pharma brands should understand this and build online platforms on which patients can utter their concerns protected by the anonymity of the WWW.
  • Many brands in the West are slowly starting to understand the shift from the quick-fix mentality towards a more sustainable conceptualisation of healthQuitting smoking requires constant motivation and support. Patients need encouragement whenever and wherever cravings strike. We understood this when Pfizer Australia tasked us with creating a support program with multiple touch-points customisable for particular patient needsOur solution was to develop an interactive patient support portal where patients could login to track their status, upload photos of loved ones for motivation and read success stories of others like them. The program comprised a website, e-mail communication and SMSUsers worked with a virtual coach, identifying triggers, the times of day when they were most likely to smoke and their motivations for quitting, e.g. their childrenThe program integrated with Pfizer’s offline patient support efforts and had an 88% retention rate of those who enrolledIt stands as one of Ogilvy Healthworld’s most lauded patient support program and Pfizer continues to use it as a model for future programs
  • This presentation is targeted at pharmaceutical companies From the perspective of a pharma brand, two main audiences are of relevance: end consumers and physiciansHence, this presentation dwells on these two audiences and describes how Social Media is changing the healthcare industry
  • Instead of feeling threatened by the increasing level of education and information on part of the consumer, Asian physicians actively embrace Social Media as a platform to further help and communicate with people. Brands can use this development to provide doctors with knowledge and curate the communication between physicians and patients. Since it is of paramount importance for doctors to stay ahead of their game and be perceived as experts, brands can help them maintain and further establish this position.
  • Similar to end consumers, physicians in Asia turn to the internet for information, support and education. Doctors in Asia don’t have the abundance of established continuing education channels such as medical journals that exist in the West. Turning to other doctors facing similar challenges in real time is the most effective information exchange. In so doing, they make use of many of the different platforms the WWW has to offer: Online videos, blogs, forums 61% of physicians in China, e.g., have used the internet to post questions and comments on different platforms, hence using the internet as a communication tool to get in touch with either patients or colleagues
  • Again, just as consumers, physicians in Asia use the Internet, and especially SNS platforms as peer support networks The above example is DXY.cn, one of China’s largest professional networks for physicians to gain insights from colleagues, discuss new clinical findings, report unusual events etc.In Asia, where the state of academic research can at times lack specific knowledge, such platforms are an invaluable add to the professional body of medicine/Brands should embrace these platforms to do several things:1. Try to find out what grievances etc physicians report and help them counteract these2. Curate information, research, news etc. in order to show physicians that they are there to help and not there to simply earn money!!!!
  • Last but not least, Social Media offers physicians new ways to directly communicate with consumers.
  • Most of the benefits that mobile offers to end consumers are also applicable to physicians1. Remote treatment and diagnosis opportunities are important for doctors as well since they can increase their reach and patient intake without actually physically extending their range2. For emergency care purposes, doctors benefit a lot from the potential of locating patients with GPS enabled devices3. The opportunity to manage long term treatment regimens remotely based on mobile technology unfold benefits along the same lines as the first point: Many doctors are physically restricted to a certain area, which leaves them unable to provide quite a lot of people in remote areas with adequate health care. Mobile technology gives them the opportunity to improves this4. There have been quite a lot of applications and knowledge sources popping up in the mobile category that physicians can use for further education and knowledge sharing.5. Health research is an important point for physicians since it enables them to gain a better insight into their patients’ health conditions
  • With more than 1000 apps, the market of professional healthapps is exploding too. Apps exist in various categories as illustrated above. They vary in complexity and functions but it’s fair to say that most of them offer a very advanced set of functions to physicians to either enhance their treatment regimen for patients or their own knowledge
  • Transcript

    • 1. Starting Shortly… Internal Training Only – Not For Clients 5 Secret Elements for Luxury Brands’ Online Success
    • 2. The new ADM blogging guidelines are out! Come, blog with us!!! 5 Secret Elements for Luxury Brands’ Online Success
    • 3. Phuket calling!!5 Secret Elementsfor Luxury day conference in March 2012 • 3 Brands’ • 1/3 WPP Online Success staff, 1/3 clients, 1/3 interesting people • Everybody takes part in panels, quick talks, cooking madness and other endeavours • Please nominate clients: • Your name, country, discipline • Your client’s name, company, position • 140 character pitch as to why they should go! • Submit to: joyce.ho@ogilvy.com
    • 4. Speakers @ThomasCrampton @JonathanNguyen Lisa Werner APAC Director Regional Strategy Director Senior Regional StrategistOgilvy & Mather Asia Pacific Ogilvy & Mather Asia Pacific Ogilvy & Mather Asia Pacific
    • 5. Questions and Comments @ogilvyasia or 5 Secret Elements for Luxury Brands’ Online Success
    • 6. Need advice?The Social@ team is at your service, but we need: 1. Involvement early in the process 2. A clear 5 Secret Elements brief for Luxury Brands’ Online Success 1. Sufficient time to respond Email: thomas.crampton@ogilvy.com jonathan.nguyen@ogilvy.com
    • 7. Week of November 7, 2011 Digital Report www.asiadigitalmap.com Since 2009 Google + opens up for brands (headline) Google has announced that its social networking platform Google + will henceforth be open to brands. Brands can finally set up brand pages. As of now, there is a high risk of fake brand pages being set up due to the relatively lax verification mechanisms. Badges are offered by the search engine giant to give brands the chance to prove the authenticity of a page. At the moment brand pages are difficult to find. A search query needs contain a brand name and “google plus” in order to be successful. Source: http://www.mashable.com Internet conquers China’s Tier 5 cities A new research report by Synovate (n=66000+), a research house part of Ipsos, shows that the Internet permeates China far beyond the known mega cities on the costal belt. Internet access in tier 5 cities now stands at 53%, not far behind the 61% figure in tier 1 cities. A quarter of the population has gone online using their mobile in the past month. The report further shows that Internet overtook all other media as the most engaging. It has the highest engagement score of 77, followed by television with an index score of 73, and mobile with the score of 68. Source: http://www.synovate.com/ Vietnam’s first private online shopping site In a market environment with a multiplicity of Groupon clones, Brandsfavor created an online private shopping club which offers members the chance to get up to 70% off branded goods. Like other private shopping sites, sales on Brandsfavor are based on small windows of just two to five days since supply is relatively scarce. Registered members receive email notifications informing them about the latest offers. Vietnam is an often neglected market. With currently about 30 million users, Vietnam’s internet penetration stands at approx. 30%. It’s hence a market with huge pontential. Source: http://techrice.com/
    • 8. Social Media in theHealthcare Industry
    • 9. Going MobileConsumer Empowered Patients Trends Exploding Peer Support Networks Caring for the Empowered PatientPhysician Exploding Professional Trends Support Networks Experimenting with Communication Channels
    • 10. Going MobileConsumer Empowered Patients Trends Exploding Peer Support Networks Caring for the Empowered PatientPhysician Exploding Professional Trends Support Networks Experimenting with Communication Channels
    • 11. The rise of mobile 1Mobile is on the rise in Asia and often outpaces fixed line and internet penetration 2888 2721 2551 2353 2143 72.6% 1904 68.5% 64.8% 1610 60.3% 55.4% 49.7% 42.5% Mobile phone usersin million Percent of population Source:eMarketer, 2011
    • 12. The rise of mobileIncreasingly sophisticated Web-enabled phones are also on the rise in Asia 1 1215 1084 951 779 623 473 39.9% 42.1% 349 37.3% 33.1% 29.1% 24.8% 21.7% 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Approx 8,800 health-apps as Mobile Internet Users in million Percent of mobile phone users of 2010 Source:eMarketer, 2011 Source:MobileHealthNews, 2010
    • 13. How mobile works for patientsPatients primarily use mobile phones in 5 days 1 Mobile health records, mobile surveys, databases Public Health Research Apps: • Remote treatment • Information Information and • Remote diagnosis • Infotainment Primary Care • Monitoring Self-Help • Management systems for chronic • Mobile based prevention devices diseases Management of • GPS enabled emergency response • Directly Observed Treatment Long-Term Emergency Care systems • Questionnaires Conditions Source: Ian et al, 2011
    • 14. The Quantified Self 1People increasingly turn to digital tools (including Social Media) to monitor themselves Quantified self 1.0 Quantified self 2.0
    • 15. Don’t forget the good old SMS 1 In many lesser developed Asian regions, SMS is a powerful tool to connect to patientsmDhil.com - India: Buddyworks - Philippines:• SMS – and mobile web-based healthcare • Government funded project using telemedicine to• Provision of SMS-based and web-based reach patients in remote areas access to India healthcare information • Remote doctors are connected to the National• SMS health text alert service Telehealth Center for expert advise via SMS and email• Target subscriber number for 2011: 3million• Growing rapidly
    • 16. Going MobileConsumer Empowered Patients Trends Exploding Peer Support Networks Caring for the Empowered PatientPhysician Exploding Professional Trends Support Networks Experimenting with Communication Channels
    • 17. Internet as information sourceAsians increasingly consult the Internet for healthcare information 2 Consumers in emerging economies are inquiring abouthealthcare information online more than advanced economies1 conduct online research before 80% consulting their doctors2 consulting internet and social 96% networking sites for sensitive health and wellness topics 2Sources: 1 Bupa Health Pulse, 2010; n= 12262 / 2 Kantar Health &BursonMarsteller, 2011; n=1019
    • 18. Online healthcare platforms 2Ever more online platforms emerge that patients can turn to for advise and help
    • 19. Sustainable wellbeing Traditionally, Chinese value a healthcare philosophy based on prevention 2 Prevention is the best cure 80% Prevention should start at an early age 70% Health insurance is necessary 60%Source: Kantar Health &BursonMarsteller, 2011; n=1019
    • 20. Importance of trustTrust in healthcare institutions is eroded by innumerable cases of quackery 2
    • 21. Importance of trustFake medicine, too, is a reason for the erosion of trust and general fear 2 Number of globally reported Estimates reach from counterfeit drug cases USD 75 bn1 to USD 200 bn2 2009: 2004: Approx. 1700 Approx. 550 Sources: 1WHO, 2009; 2PSI, 2009 Source: PSI, 2009
    • 22. Regulatory issues 2Many pharmaceutical control institutions aren’t as effective as their Western counterparts Consumers Power of regulatory bodies Power of regulatory bodies •FDA •MHRA •BfArM •SFDA (China) •EMA Regulatory bodies •CDSCO (India) •Swissmedic •Health ministries Pharma companies
    • 23. Going MobileConsumer Empowered Patients Trends Exploding Peer Support Networks Caring for the Empowered PatientPhysician Exploding Professional Trends Support Networks Experimenting with Communication Channels
    • 24. Social Media and digital as trust builder Brands that engage in Social Media and increase transparency can win trust 3 Level of trust of select information sources and ads according to internet users in APAC in % of respondents 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 9 9 7 9 9 42 60 62 67dia and 67 67ust 53 28 26 23 22 19 Friends & Experts on Product labels Independent Consumer Brand Family websites reviews in review on websites publications websites Trust Completely Trust somewhat Dont trust Dont know Source: eMarketer, 2011; n=3010
    • 25. Social Media as trust builder 3 trustBrands that engage in Social Media initiatives can create transparency and garner• Form platform founded and created by parents of diabetic children and later acquired by Johnson and Johnson.• Very “free” and unrestricted environment for people to get in touch with each other and J&J experts
    • 26. Sensitive topics 3 Many healthcare issues are sensitive topics – some politically, some personally Information or data source for sensitive topicsInternet / social networks 96% Doctors / pharmacists 68% The top 3 info sources for sensitive topics can be combined in Social Media Family / friends 31% platforms that brands can use to present themselves as trusted partners Patient groups 30% Keep to myself 4%Source: Kantar Health &BursonMarsteller, 2011; n=1019
    • 27. Big pharma as trusted partner 3 Instead of just “selling pills”, pharma brands should aim at supporting consumersPfizer’s “my time to quit” is a platform that helps people quit smoking encompassing website-based, email andsms communication. Several different functions such as a virtual coach were implemented in order to motivatepeople follow through their promise to rid themselves off the bad habit of smoking.
    • 28. Going MobileConsumer Empowered Patients Trends Exploding Peer Support Networks Caring for the Empowered PatientPhysician Exploding Professional Trends Support Networks Experimenting with Communication Channels
    • 29. Physician 2.0 4Physicians actively embrace Social Media to increase communication with patients • Dr. Zhi is an eager social media user: • Inception of his blog: 2006, • Number of posts 1,500+ • Received comments: 1900+ • Number of followers: 60000+ • In his blog he shares medical information with is patients, but also hosts online discussions about smoking cessation and health policy in China. • In 2009, Dr. Zhi started a new blog on Haodf.com, which has already received 19,953 views. • Dr. Zhi uses microblog to advocate smoking cessation. His microblog has over 3,000 followers.
    • 30. Going MobileConsumer Empowered Patients Trends Exploding Peer Support Networks Caring for the Empowered PatientPhysician Exploding Professional Trends Support Networks Experimenting with Communication Channels
    • 31. Tapping into vast amounts of information 5 to peersJust as consumers, physicians turn to the Internet to get information and connect China healthcare professionals’online activity over the last 12 months use online resources for general medical news or to stay up to date 80% with clinical information read or posted medical questions 61% of comments 60% watched online video 55% read a blog 45% instant messagedSource: Manhattenresearch, 2009
    • 32. Professional SNS 5 Physicians use SNS platforms to tap into the wisdom of the professional crowdDXY.cn (Li Xiang Garden) • Vertical community for physicians to gain insight from colleagues, discuss new clinical findings, report unusual events and more • 2,000,000+ members (30,000 new members every month) • Very comprehensive offering (more than 100 specialties) • Such websites have the potential to fill a critical gap in Asia: A relatively underdeveloped academic body of knowledge • Great opportunity for brands to curate information and share knowledge with physicians
    • 33. Going MobileConsumer Empowered Patients Trends Exploding Peer Support Networks Caring for the Empowered PatientPhysician Exploding Professional Trends Support Networks Experimenting with Communication Channels
    • 34. Communication on all frontsSocial Media platforms offer physicians new communication channels 6 • Physician networks can be equipped with Q&A and comment sections that allow • Instant messaging can be a people to actively engage with the powerful for physicians to reach curators of the platforms out to people with pressing • This is also a good platform to start online questions and concerns debates, which are usually more engaging than broadcasted content.
    • 35. “Mobile physicians” 6 Mobile is also becoming a more important communication channel for physicians • 22.4% of healthcare professionals own smartphones and 35% Own want to purchase one 22.4 Smartphone Want to purchase within the year within 6 months Want to purchase within 1 year • 13.1% of healthcare Want to purchase professionalsown Tablet sometime in future 13.1 Tablet PC PCs and 36.1% want to No plan for purchase purchase one within the year 0% 50% 100%Source: Carenet.com, 2010
    • 36. How mobile works for physiciansPhysicians primarily use mobile phones in 5 days 6 Mobile health records, mobile surveys, databases Public Health Research Apps: • Remote treatment • Education Information and • Remote diagnosis • Knowledge Sharing Primary Care Self-Help • Management systems for chronic • GPS enables emergency response diseases Management of systems • Directly Observed Treatment Long-Term Emergency Care • Questionnaires Conditions Source: Ian et al, 2011
    • 37. Professional mobile apps 6There are over 1000 professional mobile health apps across a multiplicity of categories Reference apps Education apps Monitoring apps Image apps
    • 38. Health engagementDeepening levels of interaction online CONVERSATION CONTENT CREATION SEARCH BBS, Forums Blogs, Patient generated Symptom &Condition media Treatment options PARTICIPATION Healthcare providers Joining communities, COMMUNITY CREATION HEALTH PORTAL Answering FAQ Niche disease communities, General info lifestyle + Affinity groups disease COLLABORATION Treatment options Tagging, rating, sharing Consumers SEARCH CONVERSATION CONTENT CREATION Clinical findings, research BBS, Expert forums Blogs, Microblogs, Cause- findings etc related websites, FAQs and PARTICIPATION health tips Joining professional communities, interacting COMMUNITIES with peer physicians COMMUNITY CREATION Peer knowledge Cause related communities COLLABORATION Physicians Sharing information
    • 39. Thank you! 5 Secret Elements for Luxury Brands’ Online Success Sign up for the social media email list: thomas.crampton@ogilvy.com