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Search Tips

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A few tips for more specific and faster searches in Google. Designed as introduction to search tips for journalism students. Given in association with Google Cheat Sheet. Feedback welcome.

A few tips for more specific and faster searches in Google. Designed as introduction to search tips for journalism students. Given in association with Google Cheat Sheet. Feedback welcome.

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Search Tips Search Tips Presentation Transcript

  • Search Tips
    Brought to you by evolvingnewsroom.co.nz
  • When you enter keywords into Google, it searches web pages from across the world wide web. That’s great if you want a wide search that catches any page or document that contains those words
    “Flight of the Conchords”
  • But what if you want specific information and you’re in a hurry?
  • There are ways to make Google searches more specific.... and faster
  • Let’s say you’re researching the Flight of the Conchords and you want to find a story that ran in the NZ Herald. You can search the nzherald.co.nz website from the Google search box
    site:
  • Use this syntax to ask Google to search only nzherald.co.nz for “flight of the conchords”
    site: www.nzherald.co.nz “flight of the conchords”
  • Compare the results of these two searches. The search on the right immediately gives you results from nzherald.co.nz – and hopefully just what you were looking for
    site: www.nzherald.co.nz “flight of the conchords”
    “flight of the conchords”
  • If you wanted to know about a music download, you might search the Conchords’ MySpace page
    site: www.myspace.com“flightof the conchords”
  • You can also search particular kinds of sites such as university websites (perhaps if you wanted to know whether there was any academic research into the Flight of the Conchords)
    site: .ac.nz
  • site: .govt.nz
    Or government websites
    site: .govt.nz “flight of the conchords”
  • You can quickly find websites that link to the one you’re interested in
    link:
  • In our example, the link search might help find fan clubs of the Flight of the Conchords
    link: www.flightoftheconchords.com
  • You can find what information Google has about a particular website using an info search
    info: www.flightoftheconchords.com
  • And a related search will list websites similar to the one you name
    related: www.flightoftheconchords.com
  • What if you’re stuck for the first line of a book or a phrase you only half-remember?
  • You can find websites that refer specifically to a book
    book
  • Imagine you want to know the opening line of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice
    book “pride and prejudice”
  • Which of these two searches will be most helpful in finding the novel’s opening line?
    “pride and prejudice”
    book “pride and prejudice”
  • Forgotten how a phrase goes? Try using an asterisk in the spot where the missing word goes
    how now * cow
  • If you’re researching breast cancer and don’t want any dubious search results, try this...
    safesearch:
  • safesearch: “breast cancer”
  • Auto? Automobile? Car? Runabout? Classic? If you’re not sure what to call what you’re looking for...
  • ...try putting a tilde (~) in front of your keyword. Google will look for ‘auto’ and for synonyms of ‘auto’
    ~auto
  • Imagine you want to upgrade your phone but you have a limited budget
  • Try typing the phone you want into the Google search box alongside a number range
    #...#
  • iphone $400...$600
  • Google is also a calculator
  • Use these symbols for common equations
    + - * /
  • 25 + 258
  • Here are some more
    Percentage
    Raise to a power
    Old measure innew
    Equation
    % of
    ^
    old in new
    5*9+(sqrt 10)^3
    25 % of 978
    10 ^2
    45 Celsius in Fahrenheit
    5*9+(sqrt 10)^3=
  • 25 % of 978
  • 45 Celsius in Fahrenheit
  • 5*9+(sqrt 10)^3=
  • Voila. A handful of search tips to help you work smarter and faster
  • You can find many more Google search tips on these websites
    http://www.adelaider.com/google/
    http://www.google.com/help/cheatsheet.html
  • The End
    Brought to you by evolvingnewsroom.co.nz