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    Got game Got game Presentation Transcript

      • Copyright 2011
      • Dr. Kevin Sue Bailey,
      • Director of Indiana University Southeast Writing Project
      • Dr. Kevin Sue Bailey, IUS WP Director
      • Mrs. Jessica Broady
      • Mrs. Tiffany Stansbury
      • Mrs. Tammy Nuxoll
      • Mr. David Stoner
      All resources available at the following address: http://zzwriter.com/learning-forward Password: learningforward
    • Indiana Appleseed Writing Project Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne Fort Wayne, Indiana Hoosier Writing Project Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Indianapolis, Indiana Indiana Writing Project Ball State University Muncie, Indiana IUS Writing Project Indiana University Southeast New Albany, Indiana Northwest Indiana Writing Project Purdue University Calumet Hammond, Indiana River Bend Writing Project University of Southern Indiana Evansville, Indiana
    • Members of the
    • http://iuswp.com
    •  
      • Agenda:
      • Hallway Walk of Researched Based Best Practice
      • Overview of Writers Workshop
      • Five Card Strategy
      • Peer Response
      • Revision Mini Lesson
      • Debrief
      Members of the
    • HALLWAY WALK IN A “BEST PRACTICE” SCHOOL A VISITOR WALKING DOWN THE HALLWAY WOULD SEE THE TEACHER (S)… M=MORE OF THIS PRACTICE L=LESS OF THIS PRACTICE ______1. Dictating sentences for the students to write. ______2. Teaching grammar (e.g., parts of speech, sentence structure) using workbook pages. ______3. Critiquing and grading all errors on students papers. ______4. Having students share what they have written for peer feedback. ______5. Displaying “published” copies (final revisions) of student work. ______6. Providing uninterrupted periods of time for students to write. ______7. Modeling writing techniques for students. ______8. Conferencing with individual students about their draft writing. ______9. Supporting peer conferencing among students (grade2 and higher). _____10. Reviewing revision and/or editing strategies with students. WRITING:
    •   HW Writing continued _____11. Showing students how to use a rubric to consider possible refinements to a piece of writing. _____12. Supervising students re-copying corrections marked by the teacher on rough drafts. _____13. Having students make as many corrections as necessary to obtain perfect papers. _____14. Leading students in a collaborative writing activity or working in cooperative groups to create a shared piece of writing. _____15. Giving choices about the topic/subtopics and style to respond to a writing assignment. _____16. Modeling how to write in a particular type of writing, e.g., haiku, persuasive writing. _____17. Monitoring students in their daily journal writing as the major component of the classroom writing program. _____18. Teaching students how to make notes and write research drafts or content area reports. _____19. Providing a writing center that has many “real life” writing materials, e.g., forms, applications, memo pads. _____20. Assigning daily prompts for timed writing practice.
    • HALLWAY WALK IN A “BEST PRACTICE” SCHOOL A VISITOR WALKING DOWN THE HALLWAY WOULD SEE THE TEACHER (S)… M=MORE OF THIS PRACTICE L=LESS OF THIS PRACTICE L 1. Dictating sentences for the students to write. L 2. Teaching grammar (e.g., parts of speech, sentence structure) using workbook pages. L 3. Critiquing and grading all errors on students papers. M 4. Having students share what they have written for peer feedback. M 5. Displaying “published” copies (final revisions) of student work. M 6. Providing uninterrupted periods of time for students to write. M 7. Modeling writing techniques for students. M 8. Conferencing with individual students about their draft writing. M 9. Supporting peer conferencing among students (grade2 and higher). M 10. Reviewing revision and/or editing strategies with students. WRITING:
    •   HW Writing continued M 11. Showing students how to use a rubric to consider possible refinements to a piece of writing. L 12. Supervising students re-copying corrections marked by the teacher on rough drafts. L 13. Having students make as many corrections as necessary to obtain perfect papers. M 14. Leading students in a collaborative writing activity or working in cooperative groups to create a shared piece of writing. M 15. Giving choices about the topic/subtopics and style to respond to a writing assignment. M 16. Modeling how to write in a particular type of writing, e.g., haiku, persuasive writing. L 17. Monitoring students in their daily journal writing as the major component of the classroom writing program. M 18. Teaching students how to make notes and write research drafts or content area reports. M 19. Providing a writing center that has many “real life” writing materials, e.g., forms, applications, memo pads. L 20. Assigning daily prompts for timed writing practice.
    • HALLWAY WALK IN A “BEST PRACTICE” SCHOOL A VISITOR WALKING DOWN THE HALLWAY WOULD SEE THE TEACHER(S)… M=MORE OF THIS PRACTICE L=LESS OF THIS PRACTICE READING: ______1. Engaging students in activities such as creative dramatics or role playing. ______2. Providing students time within the school day to read silently books of their own choosing. ______3. Placing students in flexible reading groups based on factors such as reading interests, book choices, and skill development. ______4. Reading aloud to students every day. ______5. Reading stories or selections in the basal textbook in sequential order. ______6. Grading papers during sustained silent reading time. ______7. Requiring students to take comprehension quizzes over books read independently. ______8. Choosing titles to be read by students for literature study. ______9. Placing students in permanent reading groups based on reading levels. _____10. Modeling reading strategies for students such as the use of context clues, look back, etc.
    • HW Reading continued _____11. Teaching subskills such as phonics or syllabication through the use of meaningful text. _____12. Emphasizing accurate reading and correct pronunciation of words in oral reading. _____13. Having students demonstrate comprehension by completing worksheets or fill in the blank activities related to the reading selection. _____14. Teaching the letters of the alphabet one at a time and requiring students to master one before moving on to the next letter. _____15. Testing students over a list of randomly selected vocabulary words. _____16. Surrounding students with a wide variety of engaging print resources in the classroom. _____17. Using a variety of multimedia such as audio tapes, CD’s, computers and CD Roms to enhance and extend reading experiences. _____18. Recommending high interest, quality books to students through booktalks and book discussions. _____19. Using the textbook or basal reader only for reading instruction. _____20. Comparing the elements of a story to those of another story. _____21. Inviting students to make predictions and give rationale explanations for their thinking.
    • HW Reading continued _____22. Asking students to read a text selection before it has been introduced in class. _____23. Asking open ended questions as prompts for literature discussions. _____24. Inviting students to retell or enact the events of a story. _____25. Frequently asking questions requiring a one-word or short answer response. _____26. Requiring students to read books by authors from different cultures or countries. _____27. Demonstrating the sue of graphic organizers to help student make meaning from informational text. _____28. Mapping story elements to help students understand the structure of narrative text. _____29. Asking students to make a judgment or take a position and defend it using information from the text to support their reasoning. _____30. Requiring book reports focusing on the analysis of literary elements.
    • HALLWAY WALK IN A “BEST PRACTICE” SCHOOL A VISITOR WALKING DOWN THE HALLWAY WOULD SEE THE TEACHER(S)… M=MORE OF THIS PRACTICE L=LESS OF THIS PRACTICE READING: M 1. Engaging students in activities such as creative dramatics or role playing. M 2. Providing students time within the school day to read silently books of their own choosing. M 3. Placing students in flexible reading groups based on factors such as reading interests, book choices, and skill development. M 4. Reading aloud to students every day. L 5. Reading stories or selections in the basal textbook in sequential order. L 6. Grading papers during sustained silent reading time. L 7. Requiring students to take comprehension quizzes over books read independently. L 8. Choosing titles to be read by students for literature study. L 9. Placing students in permanent reading groups based on reading levels. M 10. Modeling reading strategies for students such as the use of context clues, look back, etc.
    • HW Reading continued M 11. Teaching subskills such as phonics or syllabication through the use of meaningful text. L 12. Emphasizing accurate reading and correct pronunciation of words in oral reading. L 13. Having students demonstrate comprehension by completing worksheets or fill in the blank activities related to the reading selection. L 14. Teaching the letters of the alphabet one at a time and requiring students to master one before moving on to the next letter. L 15. Testing students over a list of randomly selected vocabulary words. M 16. Surrounding students with a wide variety of engaging print resources in the classroom. M 17. Using a variety of multimedia such as audio tapes, CD’s, computers and CD Roms to enhance and extend reading experiences. M 18. Recommending high interest, quality books to students through booktalks and book discussions. L 19. Using the textbook or basal reader only for reading instruction. M 20. Comparing the elements of a story to those of another story. M 21. Inviting students to make predictions and give rationale explanations for their thinking.
    • HW Reading continued L 22. Asking students to read a text selection before it has been introduced in class. M 23. Asking open ended questions as prompts for literature discussions. M 24. Inviting students to retell or enact the events of a story. L 25. Frequently asking questions requiring a one-word or short answer response. M 26. Requiring students to read books by authors from different cultures or countries. M 27. Demonstrating the sue of graphic organizers to help student make meaning from informational text. M 28. Mapping story elements to help students understand the structure of narrative text. M 29. Asking students to make a judgment or take a position and defend it using information from the text to support their reasoning. L 30. Requiring book reports focusing on the analysis of literary elements.
    • Language Arts Standards Word Recognition, Fluency, Vocabulary Reading Comprehension Literary Response, Analysis Reading Writing Speaking Listening Writing Process Writing Conventions Writing Applications Presentation Group Work
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      • Prewriting
      • Drafting
      • Revision
      • Editing
      • Publishing
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    • LANGUAGE CONVENTIONS
      • Mini lessons
      • Grammar in context
      • Mentor Texts
      • Editing
    •  
    • Card # 1- Discovering / Listening Free write a list of topics Card # 2 – Narrowing Write a sentence on two or three topics. Card # 3 – Detailing Select one topic and free write a list of specific details about it. Card # 4 – Focusing Write two different beginning sentences on the topic, or write two different sentences containing the main idea of the topic. Card # 5 – Drafting Select one of the options on card # 4 and write for ten minutes.
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    • WRITING TO LEARN
      • Note Taking
      • Summarizing
      • Journaling
      • Personal Reflection
      • Learning Logs
      • Writer’s Notebook
      • Sketching
      • Non-linguistic representation
      • Graphic Organizers
      • Admit/Exit slips
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    • WRITING TO DEMONSTRATE LEARNING
      • Response to Literature
      • Essay Tests
      • Homework/Short Response
      • Summaries
      • Collaborative Writing
    • AUTHENTIC WRITING
      • Personal Narrative
      • Memoir
      • Letter Writing
      • Poetry
      • Research
      • Expository Writing
      • Fiction/Creative Writing
      • Reports
      • How-to –do –it
      • Process Papers
      • Persuasive Writing
      • Compare and Contrast
      • Research Papers
      • Technical Writing
      • Biography/Autobiography
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    • READING COMPREHENSION SKILLS STRATEGIES Text features Browse the book/textbook treasure Predicting Outcomes KWL Point of View Mentor text model - Voices in the Park Main Idea Graphic organizer-arch diagram Supporting Details Using text to support response Cornell note-taking -2 column notes Compare/Contrast Venn diagram Cause/Effect Cause/Effect Chain Fact/Opinion T-Chart Summarize Paragraph writing Paraphrase Quick write Informational vs. Narrative Text Text highlighting Story frame graphic organizer Analysis Reader response log Inference Cartoons Critical Reader Response, “It said, I said” Synthesis Research Evaluation Critic reviews
      • 5 Step Vocabulary Process –
      • Present students with brief explanations or descriptions of words
      • Give a nonlinguistic representation of term or phrase
      • Ask students to generate their own explanations or description
      • Ask students to create their own nonlinguistic representation
      • Periodically ask students to review accuracy of their explanations and representations
        • Storyboarding
        • Generate mental pictures
        • Graphic organizers
          • Venn diagram
          • T Chart
          • Window panes
        • Role playing
        • Kinesthetic activities – Walk and Talk
        • Frayer Model
    •  
      • “ Principals took responsibility for their own behaviors.
      • Principals were perceived as people first and roles second.
      • Principals were perceived as non-manipulative.” (Costa and Garmston 37)
      • Costa, Arthur L. and Robert J. Garmston.
      • Cognitive Coaching a Foundation for Renaissance Schools.
      • Norwood, Massachusetts: Christopher-Gordon Publishers, Inc., 1994.
    • Trust vs. Rapport “ Trust is about the whole of a relationship; rapport is about the moment.” (Costa and Garmston 36)
    • Costa and Garmston cite the following behaviors associated with trust:
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      • Are you visible and accessible to all faculty members equally?
      • Do you maintain confidentiality?
      • Do you honor commitments?
      Establish a foundation of trust
      • Do you listen non-judgmentally?
      • Do you listen to understand?
      Listen with interest, curiosity, and intensity
      • Are learning goals established and communicated clearly?
      • Are structures in place for all stakeholders to provide input?
      Communicate clearly, frequently, and non-judgmentally
      • Is professional development and collaboration part of the school day?
      • Are resources provided to support new learning?
      • Are opportunities available for peer observation and coaching?
      Provide time and resources
      • Are best practices institutionalized while the art of teaching is honored and encouraged?
      • Is the environment supportive and non- threatening for risk-takers?
      • Is the environment non-threatening and rewarding to those who have been recognized for their successes?
      Encourage individual strengths, interests and risk-taking
      • Would teachers say that they feel supported by the administration?
      • Would teachers say that the leader walks the talk?
      • Is the message consistent, regardless of the audience?
      Model Integrity
      • Do you know when you have achieved your goals?
      • Does everyone have goals:
      • students, teachers, teams, school, district?
      • Are there opportunities to celebrate when goals are met?
      Celebrate Successes
    • Jim Collins found that good-to-great leaders did not begin with a new vision . Instead, good-to-great leaders, “… first got the right people on the bus, the wrong people off the bus, and the right people in the right seats—and then figured out where to drive it.” ( Collins 13) Collins, Jim. Good-to-Great . New York: HarperCollins. Get the right people on the bus!
    • WARNING! Images found in Toxic Cultures
    • Keeper of the Nightmare
    • Negaholics
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    • Space cadets
    • Martyrs
    • Deadwood, Driftwood and Ballast
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    • Deal, Terrance E. and Kent D. Peterson. Shaping School Culture. San Francisco: Josey Bass, Inc. 1999, 127-128 .
    •  
    • (McAndrew 125)
    • “ Those whom we fail to invite into the change process are the very people who will poison our process” (Wheatley 110)
    • Final Question
    • Who needs to be here?