ICT Literacy and Common Core - April 2013
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ICT Literacy and Common Core - April 2013

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Connections between the NH ICT Literacy and Common Core State Standards in terms of teaching expectations.

Connections between the NH ICT Literacy and Common Core State Standards in terms of teaching expectations.

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  • 1. Stan FreedaICT LITERACY STANDARDS 1
  • 2. NEW HAMPSHIRE INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONLITERACY STANDARDS Part of the Minimum Standards for School Approval (Ed 306.42)New Hampshire Minimum Standards for School Approval include a section for informationand communication technologies (ICT) literacy (Ed 306.42). They became effective onJuly 1, 2005.Ed 306.42 requires all K-8 students to develop a digital portfolio which is assessed for ICTliteracy by the end of 8th grade.Ed 306.42 requires students to complete at least 1/2 credit of computer technology literacyprior to high school graduation.These standards are were revised and updated to better reflect current understanding of21st century literacies. ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 2
  • 3. NEW HAMPSHIRE INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONLITERACY STANDARDS ALIGNMENT OF STANDARDS THE NH DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION RELEASED TECHNICAL ADVISORY #2 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES (ICT) TO PROVIDE GUIDANCE AND ANSWERS TO FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS. GLE READING & LITERACY SKILLS ALIGNMENT - IN JULY 2006 A TASK FORCE OF LIBRARY MEDIA SPECIALISTS REVIEWED THREE SEPARATE DOCUMENTS: GRADE LEVEL EXPECTATIONS FOR READING K-8, INFORMATION LITERACY STANDARDS FROM AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL LIBRARIANS, AND THE NH ICT LITERACY STANDARDS AND CAME UP WITH AN ALIGNMENT OF ALL THREE. ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 3
  • 4. NEW HAMPSHIRE INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONLITERACY STANDARDS Ed 306.42 (2005) (a) Opportunities for Students to: K-12 Standards 1. Develop responsible use 2. Become proficient in 21st Century Tools Within Core Subjects Reading, Math, ELA, Science, Social Studies, Arts, World Languages 3. Use tools for learning Literacy, numeracy, problem solving, decision making, spatial literacy 4. Use tools for technical knowledge Hardware, software, networks, technology elements 5. Create Digital Portfolios which demonstrate a. 6 ISTE NETS-S Components b. Responsible use of tools in Core subjects c. Digital Artifacts Tests, observations, work, reflections ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 4
  • 5. NEW HAMPSHIRE INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONLITERACY STANDARDS Ed 306.42 (2005) K-12 Standards (b) Assess the student digital portfolio for competency in ICT Literacy by the end of 8th grade. (c) Provide opportunities for high school students to take ½ credit ICT course 1. Common productivity tools 2. Multimedia software 3. Basic hardware and configurations 4. Applying programming concepts ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 5
  • 6. ICT LITERACY STANDARDSProgram Standards not Curriculum Standards There is an ICT literacy toolkit available on NHEON. www.nheon.org/ictliteracy/ Components for Assessment are based on the National Educational Technology Standards for Students (ISTE NETS – S) ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 6
  • 7. NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS 1998 NETS-SSix Broad Categories1. Basic operations and concepts;2. Social, ethical, and human issues;3. Technology productivity tools;4. Technology communications tools;5. Technology research tools; and6. Technology problem solving anddecision-making tools; ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 7
  • 8. NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS Learning Teaching and Leading in the Digital Agewww.iste.org/standardsStandards Developed for:• Students• Teachers• Administrators• Coaches• Computer Science Educators ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 8
  • 9. NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS 2007 NETS-S Refreshed ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 9
  • 10. NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS 1998 NETS-S aligned with 2007 NETS-S ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 10
  • 11. NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS NETS-S emphasis 1998 v. 2007 1998 – emphasis on the technology 2007 – emphasis on the learning action Technology Productivity Tools Creativity and Innovation Students use Students demonstrate technology tools to creative thinking, enhance learning, construct knowledge, increase productivity, and develop innovative and promote creativity. products and processes using technology tools. ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 11
  • 12. ICT LITERACY ANDTHE NH COLLEGE & CAREER READY STANDARDS English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical SubjectsMedia and Technology Just as media and technology are integrated in school and life in the twenty-first century, skills related to media use (both critical analysis and production of media) are integrated throughout the standards.They use technology and digital media strategically and capably. Students employ technology thoughtfully to enhance their reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language use. They tailor their searches online to acquire useful information efficiently, and they integrate what they learn using technology with what they learn offline. They are familiar with the strengths and limitations of various technological tools and mediums and can select and use those best suited to their communication goals. NOT JUST ABOUT USING COMPUTERS FOR RESEARCH ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 12
  • 13. ICT LITERACY ANDTHE NH COLLEGE & CAREER READY STANDARDS English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical SubjectsCCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.2a Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of two pages in a single sitting. ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 13
  • 14. ICT LITERACY ANDTHE NH COLLEGE & CAREER READY STANDARDS English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical SubjectsCCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.6.2 Interpret information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue under study.CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.6.5 Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images, music, sound) and visual displays in presentations to clarify information. ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 14
  • 15. ICT LITERACY ANDTHE NH COLLEGE & CAREER READY STANDARDS English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical SubjectsCCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2a Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information. ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 15
  • 16. ICT LITERACY AND ASSESSMENT Teaching with Technology and Testing with TechnologyThe Common Core State Standards, and the NH ICT Literacy Standards bothrequire integrating technology use into teaching and learning.The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium will require students areassessed using technology. Online assessments begin 2015! ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 16
  • 17. TECHNOLOGY READINESS Both Consortia wanted a Technology Readiness Tool that would be able to assess current capacity and compare that to the technology guidelines that will be needed to administer the 2015 online assessments. Data would be evaluated in 4 areas: 1. Computers & other devices 2. Ratio of devices to test-takers 3. Network and infrastructure 4. Personnel (staffing & training) Pearson developed the Technology Readiness Tool ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 17
  • 18. TECHNOLOGY READINESS Information about the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium can be found on their website. www.SmarterBalanced.org www.education.nh.gov/spotlight/ccss/sbac.htm The State Educational Technology Directors Association sponsors an informational networking site to help schools, districts, and states understand the process and get help. Join the NH Group! www.Assess4Ed.net Information about Technology Readiness and the Technology Readiness Tool is on the NH Technology Readiness page on NHEON. www.nheon.org/oet/readiness ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 18
  • 19. RESOURCES ON NHEON.ORG www.nheon.org/oet/readiness ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 19
  • 20. NEW HAMPSHIRE DATA www.nheon.org/oet/readiness Submission Status • 50% of Schools have Indicated Data are Complete15 April 2013 Device Indicators • 58% of Devices Meet the Minimum Requirements Device to Test Taker Indicator • 34% of Eligible Test-Takers can be Tested on Existing Devices based on Minimum Requirements Network Indicators • 48% of Schools have Sufficient Infrastructure to Carry the Data Traffic for this Assessment based on Minimum Requirements ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 20
  • 21. NEW HAMPSHIRE DATA Computers and Other Devices Information on computers and other devices were input into the tool. The data collected for each device was: • How many? • What operating system? • What processor is in the device? • How much memory? • What is the screen resolution of the device display? • What is the monitor/display size? • Which browser is installed? • Can it connect to wireless? • What type of device? ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 21
  • 22. NEW HAMPSHIRE DATA Network and Infrastructure Information on network and infrastructure was entered into the tool. The data collected from each school was: Hardware • What is the estimated Internet Bandwidth? • What is the estimated Internal Network Bandwidth? • Estimate how much Internet Bandwidth is used? • Estimate how much Internal Network is used? • How many Wireless Access Points are in the school? School • What is the maximum Number of Simultaneous Test-Takers? • What is the estimated Test-Taker Count for 2014-2015 school year? • What is the length of Testing Window in School Days? • How many Testing Sessions in each school day? ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 22
  • 23. NEW HAMPSHIRE DATA Test Administrators and Staffing Information on the personnel/staff and their training were input into the tool. The data collected from each school was in the form of rating concerns around issues and roadblocks that affect the staff. A 1 – 10 rating scale was used. 1. Having a sufficient number of test administrators to support online testing. 2. Test administrators having sufficient technical understanding to support online testing. 3. Providing all appropriate training needed for test administrators. 4. Having a sufficient number of technology support staff to support online testing. 5. Technology support staff having sufficient technical understanding to support online testing." 6. Providing all appropriate training needed for technology support staff. ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 23
  • 24. NEW HAMPSHIRE DATA www.nheon.org/oet/readiness SAU Schools Reporting Complete 50 4515 April 2013 40 Participation of 35 NH Schools Number of SAUs 30 25 20 15 reporting 52% 10 not 5 reporting 0 48% 1 - 25% 26 - 50% 51 - 75% 76 - 100% Percent of Schools Complete ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 24
  • 25. THE GOOD NEWS At least half of our districts are using the tech readiness tool to get ready. The technology required to test online is not terribly advanced, hard to come by, or complicated. Our districts have had technology support through Title IID of ESEA for the past decade. Most schools will be able to meet the technology requirements to assess their students online, but the 2015 deadline. ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 25
  • 26. THE BAD NEWS At least half of our districts are not using the tech readiness tool to get ready. While the technology required to test online is not terribly advanced, hard to come by, or complicated, many districts fail to recognize the importance of making technology use a requirement of all staff and students. We still have recognized “tech teachers” and accept teachers who identify themselves as “not a techy” or “don’t use technology”. As education leaders, we often fail to recognize the importance of technology, emphasize, or model technology integration when we deliver, promote, or approve professional development opportunities or teacher training. Our students are learning technology “on their own”, because it engages them and they want to use it, but they are not learning good digital citizenship or responsible use at the same time. ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 26
  • 27. THE TAKE AWAYWhat do we do now?  Model and Expect Proficiency in the ISTE NETS-T• We need to take seriously our role as education leaders in New Hampshire.• We can’t just host “professional development” that talks about content or pedagogy without integrating the use of technology or ICT Literacy skills into the experience, we have to model the use of tech literacy skills and abilities in our actions and teaching for the field.• We have to insist that professional development we deliver, authorize, promote, and approve, integrates technology and models its effective use. • Engages socially through peer interactions both online and offline • Stresses metacognitive processes enriched by technology • Extends learning beyond the “workshop” or “webinar” or “seminar” through continued online interactions with content and resources • Requires a project based / demonstration product to assess learning • Seamlessly integrates online tools and resources to enhance learning• We have to insist that our professional development providers follow this collaborative and metacognitive model as well. ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 27
  • 28. THE TAKE AWAY The Bottom Line We cannot effectively use technology and online tools for engaging assessments unless we effectively teach kids using those same technologies and online tools to support and engage them in their learning. ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 28
  • 29. RESOURCES New Hampshire Educators Online (NHEON) NHEON.org www.nheon.org NH e-Learning for Educators Project NH e-Learning for Educators informational website www.opennh.org OPEN NH course and tutorial management system www.opennh.net Online Learning in New Hampshire www.nheon.org/onlinelearning Institute in a Box Collaboration Rings Common Core Lesson Sharing www.nhdrc.org ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 29
  • 30. THE END Questions and Answers ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 30
  • 31. OFFICE OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY Contact Information @ Stan Freeda New Hampshire Technology Readiness Coordinator Office of Educational Technology New Hampshire Department of Education Stanley.Freeda@doe.nh.gov 603.271.5132 www.education.nh.gov www.nheon.org www.opennh.org ICT LITERACY STANDARDS 31