1Stan FreedaT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D ...
AGENDAT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T ...
WHAT IS COMPETENCY?3com·pe·ten·cy [kom-pi-tuhn-see]having the behaviors, knowledge,skills and abilities that arenecessary ...
ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL4(b) The required curriculum content shall comply with the following:(4) If a d...
ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL5Ed 306.27 High School Curriculum, Credits, GraduationRequirements, and Cocurri...
ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL6TA #12 Competency Assessment of Student Mastery (2006)State Standards indicate...
ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL7Ed 306.38 Family and Consumer Science Education Program(a) Pursuant to Ed 306....
ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL8Ed 306.38 Family and Consumer Science Education Program(4) Instruction in both...
ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL9Ed 306.38 Family and Consumer Science Education Program(b) Pursuant to Ed 306....
ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL10Ed 306.38 Family and Consumer Science Education Program(5) Courses totaling a...
ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL11Ed 306.38 Family and Consumer Science Education Program(6) Systematic instruc...
ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL12Renewal of Minimum Standards is dueNew Hampshire Standards for School Approva...
LEARN MORE ABOUT COMPETENCY ONLINE13www.CompetencyWorks.orgwww.education.nh.gov/innovations/hs_redesign/competencies.htmww...
COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS14com·pe·ten·cy [kom-pi-tuhn-see]having the behaviors, knowledge, skills andabilities that are necess...
STANDARDS15something set up and established byauthority as a rule for the measureof quantity, weight, extent, value, orqua...
NEW HAMPSHIRECOLLEGE AND CAREER READY STANDARDS16• Common Core State Standards for Mathematics• Common Core State Standard...
COMMON PRACTICES17English Language Arts Capacities1. Demonstrate independence.2. Build strong content knowledge.3. Respond...
COMMON PRACTICES18ELA Capacities manifest as:“construct effective arguments,” “request clarification,” “ask relevant quest...
COMMON PRACTICES19Mathematical Practices1. Make sense of problems and persevere insolving them.2. Reason abstractly and qu...
COMMON PRACTICESScience and Engineering Practices1. Asking questions and defining problems.2. Developing and using models....
21• Knowledge through content-richtext.• Reason abstractly andquantitatively.• Construct arguments.• Critique the reasonin...
2216 Content AreasPERFORMANCE IS AT THE CORE1. Career, Community and Family2. Consumer & Family Resources3. Consumer Servi...
23Process / ActionFrameworkPERFORMANCE IS AT THE COREProcess Questions FrameworkProcess AreasTypes of ActionTechnical Acti...
COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS24Where are we onstandards?something set up and establishedby authority as a rule for themeasure of q...
NEW WAYS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING25ENGAGING IN CONTENT RICH DISCUSSIONS AND REFLECTIVE ACTIONS THATENABLE STUDENTS TO MAKE...
COMMONALITIES AT THE CORE26AT THE CORE OF ALL THESE STANDARDS IS:• REASONING WITH EVIDENCE.• BUILDING ARGUMENTS AND CRITIQ...
COMMONALITIES AT THE CORE27REASONING, IN THE SERVICE OF MAKING ARGUMENTS THATSUPPORT AND JUSTIFY ACTIONS.• REQUIRES THAT T...
COMMONALITIES AT THE CORE28TEACHERS WILL HAVE TO HELP ALL STUDENTS:• EXTERNALIZE THEIR THINKING;• LISTEN CAREFULLY TO ONE ...
COMMON PRACTICES IN TEACHING29Points to Consider:• “Reasoning practices” in all content areas have to be enacted, andfor l...
THE GOOD NEWS30“Reasoning” practices are common to all modern standards. Bigbang for the buck.The practices of discussion ...
THE BAD NEWS31The dominant forms of talk in classrooms — recitation and directinstruction — do NOT support reasoning, buil...
LEARN MORE ABOUT STANDARDS ONLINE32www.NextGenScience.orgwww.CoreStandards.orgwww.nasafacs.org/national-standards-home.htm...
RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS33New Hampshire Educators Online www.nheon.orgOPEN NH Professional Development www.opennh.orgNH Digi...
34THE ENDT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S...
35OFFICE OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGYContact InformationStan FreedaEducational Technology and Online Learning SpecialistNH SB...
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What's Common Core about Family and Consumer Sciences?

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Presentation made to the NH Association of Family and Consumer Sciences spring conference in Manchester, NH on May 3, 2013.

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What's Common Core about Family and Consumer Sciences?

  1. 1. 1Stan FreedaT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  2. 2. AGENDAT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S 2• Competency• New Hampshire College and Career ReadyStandards• New Ways of Teaching and Learning• Open Discussion
  3. 3. WHAT IS COMPETENCY?3com·pe·ten·cy [kom-pi-tuhn-see]having the behaviors, knowledge,skills and abilities that arenecessary for successfuldemonstration of knowledge andunderstanding.MultidimensionalFamily Consumer Science Knowledge Skill BehaviorContent Process DispositionT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  4. 4. ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL4(b) The required curriculum content shall comply with the following:(4) If a district chooses to offer extended learning opportunities, theextended learning opportunities shall:b. Be governed by a policy adopted by the local school board that:5. Requires that granting of credits shall be based on a student’sdemonstration of competencies, as approved by certifiededucators;Ed 306.27 High School Curriculum, Credits, GraduationRequirements, and Cocurricular Program.T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  5. 5. ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL5Ed 306.27 High School Curriculum, Credits, GraduationRequirements, and Cocurricular Program.(d) The local school board shall require that a high school credit can be earned bydemonstrating mastery of required competencies for the course, as approved bycertified school personnel. Each high school shall determine the number of creditsto be awarded for successful demonstration of competencies following completionof a classroom course, independent study, distance learning course, or extendedlearning opportunity. One credit shall equate to the level of rigor and achievementnecessary to master competencies that have been designed to demonstrate theknowledge and skills necessary to progress toward college level and career work.Determination of the weight of each course competency on which credit is based,as well as the degree of mastery on which credit will be granted, shall be a localdecision.T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  6. 6. ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL6TA #12 Competency Assessment of Student Mastery (2006)State Standards indicate that local districts must have a competencyassessment process and defined competencies in place by the 2008-2009school year. The school approval standards state that local school boardsmay implement competency assessment of student mastery at the highschool level at any time, but it is not required by the state standards until the2008-2009 school year.http://www.education.nh.gov/standards/documents/advisory12.pdfT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  7. 7. ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL7Ed 306.38 Family and Consumer Science Education Program(a) Pursuant to Ed 306.26, the local school board shall require that a family andconsumer science education program in each middle school provides:(1) Instructions which emphasizes the use of critical and creative thinking skills toaddress problems as individuals in diverse family, community, and workenvironments;(2) Planned activities designed to promote becoming responsible citizens andleaders in family, community, and work settings;(3) Experiences which develop students’ information-gathering techniques,including, but not limited to:a. Collecting, analyzing, organizing, and presenting information;b. Decision making and problem solving;c. Self-management;d. Communication and conflict resolution; ande. Technological literacy;T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  8. 8. ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL8Ed 306.38 Family and Consumer Science Education Program(4) Instruction in both subject matter and process, with an emphasis on breadthrather than depth;(5) Experiences which develop students knowledge and skills in:a. Managing foods and nutrition;b. Consumer and family resource management;c. Interpersonal relationships; andd. Human growth and development; and(6) Systematic instruction and activities designed to enable students to:a. Manage foods and nutrition as follows:b. In the area of consumer and resource management:c. In the area of interpersonal relationships:d. In the area of human growth and development:T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  9. 9. ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL9Ed 306.38 Family and Consumer Science Education Program(b) Pursuant to Ed 306.27, the local school board shall require that afamily and consumer science education program in each high schoolprovides:(1) Opportunities for students to develop the knowledge, skills, attitudes, andbehaviors needed for balancing personal, home, family, and work lives;(2) Instruction which emphasizes the development of all individuals intoeffectively literate consumers and managers of resources;(3) Instruction which emphasizes knowledge and skills to promote optimalfood, nutrition, and wellness practices;(4) Opportunities for students to develop an awareness of careeropportunities and to function as leaders in family, community, and worksettings;T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  10. 10. ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL10Ed 306.38 Family and Consumer Science Education Program(5) Courses totaling at least 3 credits, of which:a. At least ½ credit is devoted to adult roles and responsibilities covering:1. Personal financial literacy;2. Interpersonal relationships;3. Communications and conflict resolution; and4. Positive adult roles; andb. At least 2 ½ credits are from the following areas of study:1. Career, community, and family relations;2. Consumer and resource management;3. Foods, nutrition, and wellness;4. Hospitality, tourism, and facilities management;5. Housing and textiles; and6. Human growth and development; andT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  11. 11. ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL11Ed 306.38 Family and Consumer Science Education Program(6) Systematic instruction and activities designed to enable students to:a. Balance personal, home, family, and work lives;b. Promote optimal nutrition and wellness across the life span;c. Function effectively as providers and consumers of goods and services;d. Manage resources to meet the needs of individuals and families;e. Strengthen the well-being of individuals and families;f. Develop attitudes and habits conductive to career planning, preparation,and success;g. Understand the principles of human growth and development;h. Manage housing, furnishings, clothing, and textiles; andi. Understand the hospitality and tourism industry.T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  12. 12. ED 306MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL APPROVAL12Renewal of Minimum Standards is dueNew Hampshire Standards for School Approval were adopted in 2005through 2013.Standards are due to be updated.Next Generation Learning Initiative in NH.Innovative education is supported.Every indication suggests:• stronger emphasis on competency.• less dependence on course structure.T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  13. 13. LEARN MORE ABOUT COMPETENCY ONLINE13www.CompetencyWorks.orgwww.education.nh.gov/innovations/hs_redesign/competencies.htmwww.inacol.org/research/competency/T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  14. 14. COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS14com·pe·ten·cy [kom-pi-tuhn-see]having the behaviors, knowledge, skills andabilities that are necessary for successfuldemonstration of knowledge andunderstanding.Where are we on coursecompetencies?T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  15. 15. STANDARDS15something set up and established byauthority as a rule for the measureof quantity, weight, extent, value, orquality.stan·dard [stan-derd]T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  16. 16. NEW HAMPSHIRECOLLEGE AND CAREER READY STANDARDS16• Common Core State Standards for Mathematics• Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/SocialStudies, Science, and Technical Subjects• NH Framework for Science Literacy• (may be replaced with Next Generation Science Standards)• NH Framework for Social Studies• (may be updated to reflect National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies)• National Standards for Arts Education• (may be replaced with the National Core Arts Standards)• Information and Communication Technologies Literacy Standards (ED 306.42, ISTENETS-S)• National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education• National Health Education Standards• National Standards for Physical Education• International Technology Education Association Standards for Technological LiteracyT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  17. 17. COMMON PRACTICES17English Language Arts Capacities1. Demonstrate independence.2. Build strong content knowledge.3. Respond to the varying demands ofaudience, task, purpose, and discipline.4. Comprehend as well as critique.5. Value evidence.6. Use technology and digital mediastrategically and capably.7. Come to understand other perspectives andcultures.T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  18. 18. COMMON PRACTICES18ELA Capacities manifest as:“construct effective arguments,” “request clarification,” “ask relevant questions,”“build on others’ ideas,” “articulate their own ideas,” “question assumptions andpremises,” “assess the veracity of claims,” “assess the soundness of reasoning,”“cite specific evidence,” “make their reasoning clear,” “constructivelyevaluate others’ use of evidence,” “evaluate other points of view critically andconstructively,” “express and listen carefully to ideas,” “cite specific textualevidence to support conclusions,” “delineate and evaluate the argument andspecific claims in a text including the validity of the reasoning as well as therelevance and sufficiency of the evidence,” “participate effectively in a range ofconversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.”T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  19. 19. COMMON PRACTICES19Mathematical Practices1. Make sense of problems and persevere insolving them.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.3. Construct viable arguments and critiquethe reasoning of others.4. Model with mathematics.5. Use appropriate tools strategically.6. Attend to precision.7. Look for and make use of structure.8. Look for and express regularity in repeatedreasoning.T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  20. 20. COMMON PRACTICESScience and Engineering Practices1. Asking questions and defining problems.2. Developing and using models.3. Planning and carrying out investigations.4. Analyzing and interpreting data.5. Using mathematics, information and computer technology,and computational thinking.6. Constructing explanations and designing solutions .7. Engaging in argument from evidence.8. Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information.20• Core Ideas• CrosscuttingConcepts• PracticesT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  21. 21. 21• Knowledge through content-richtext.• Reason abstractly andquantitatively.• Construct arguments.• Critique the reasoning of others.• Argue with evidence.PERFORMANCE IS AT THE CORET E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  22. 22. 2216 Content AreasPERFORMANCE IS AT THE CORE1. Career, Community and Family2. Consumer & Family Resources3. Consumer Services4. Education & Early Childhood5. Facilities Management6. Family7. Family & Community Service8. Food Production & Service9. Food Science, Dietetics, Nutrition10. Hospitality, Tourism, Recreation11. Housing, Interior Design12. Human Development13. Interpersonal Relationships14. Nutrition15. Parenting16. Textiles, Fashion, ApparelT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S“ [middle school]… emphasison breadth rather thandepth.”
  23. 23. 23Process / ActionFrameworkPERFORMANCE IS AT THE COREProcess Questions FrameworkProcess AreasTypes of ActionTechnical Action Interpretive Action Reflective ActionThinkingProcessesQuestions that lead totechnical actions aboutthinking processesQuestions that lead tointerpretive actionsabout thinkingprocessesQuestions that lead toreflective actionsabout thinkingprocessesCommunicationProcessesQuestions that lead totechnical actions aboutcommunicationprocessesQuestions that lead tointerpretive actionsabout communicationprocessesQuestions that lead toreflective actionsabout communicationprocessesLeadershipProcessesQuestions that lead totechnical actions aboutleadership processesQuestions that lead tointerpretive actionsabout leadershipprocessesQuestions that lead toreflective actionsabout leadershipprocessesManagementProcessesQuestions that lead totechnical actions aboutmanagementprocessesQuestions that lead tointerpretive actionsabout managementprocessesQuestions that lead toreflective actionsabout managementprocessesFigure 1: Design matrix for process questions in the National Standards for Family andConsumer Sciences EducationT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  24. 24. COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS24Where are we onstandards?something set up and establishedby authority as a rule for themeasure of quantity, weight, extent,value, or quality.stan·dard [stan-derd]T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  25. 25. NEW WAYS OF TEACHING AND LEARNING25ENGAGING IN CONTENT RICH DISCUSSIONS AND REFLECTIVE ACTIONS THATENABLE STUDENTS TO MAKE DECISIONS AND SOLVE PROBLEMS WITHEVIDENCE.REQUIRES EFFECTIVE PROJECT BASED TEACHING AND PERFORMANCE BASEDASSESSMENTSEXEMPLIFIES TEACHING PRACTICES FOR ALL NH COLLEGE AND CAREERREADY AREAS.SCIENCE AND FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE TEACHING ALREADYENGAGES IN THOSE PRACTICES.T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  26. 26. COMMONALITIES AT THE CORE26AT THE CORE OF ALL THESE STANDARDS IS:• REASONING WITH EVIDENCE.• BUILDING ARGUMENTS AND CRITIQUING THE ARGUMENTSOF OTHERS.• DEVELOPING RIGOROUS, CONCEPTUALLY STRONG,EVIDENCE-BASED THINKING PRACTICES.• PARTICIPATING IN REASONING-ORIENTED PRACTICES ANDACTIONS WITH OTHERS.A FEW MORE OF THESE PRACTICES SEEM TO RELATEEXPLICITLY TO SENSE-MAKING AND DISCUSSION:REASONING, IN THE SERVICE OF MAKING ARGUMENTS THATSUPPORT AND JUSTIFY ACTIONS.T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  27. 27. COMMONALITIES AT THE CORE27REASONING, IN THE SERVICE OF MAKING ARGUMENTS THATSUPPORT AND JUSTIFY ACTIONS.• REQUIRES THAT TEACHERS FOCUS MORE ATTENTION ONREASONING AND “THINKING PRACTICES.”• REQUIRES STUDENTS TO PARTICIPATE IN MAKING THEIRTHINKING PUBLIC AND COGENT.• STUDENTS WILL NEED GUIDANCE TO MAKING THEIRTHINKING…• Visible• Public• Available to others…IN SPEAKING AND WRITING!T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  28. 28. COMMONALITIES AT THE CORE28TEACHERS WILL HAVE TO HELP ALL STUDENTS:• EXTERNALIZE THEIR THINKING;• LISTEN CAREFULLY TO ONE ANOTHERAND TAKE ONE ANOTHER SERIOUSLY;• DIG DEEPER INTO THE DATA AND EVIDENCE FOR THEIRPOSITIONS;• WORK WITH THE REASONING OF OTHERS.T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  29. 29. COMMON PRACTICES IN TEACHING29Points to Consider:• “Reasoning practices” in all content areas have to be enacted, andfor learners, most are enacted socially, through talk and writing.• “Social” does not just mean student-led group work. Well-structured social interaction builds in time to think as an individual– making thinking available - metacognition.These are hallmarks of Family & Consumer Sciences teaching.T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  30. 30. THE GOOD NEWS30“Reasoning” practices are common to all modern standards. Bigbang for the buck.The practices of discussion transfer from one content domain toanother.We now know a great deal about how to induct students, from allbackgrounds, into these reasoning practices, through rigorous,content-rich, teacher-guided discussions.Good teaching has always supported these practices.Family & Consumer Science teachers are already there.T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  31. 31. THE BAD NEWS31The dominant forms of talk in classrooms — recitation and directinstruction — do NOT support reasoning, building arguments withevidence, explaining, critiquing, and building common ground.Teachers are often not well-prepared to lead academicallyproductive, reasoning-oriented discussions.Teachers often rely on group work, hoping that the hands-onactivities, in small groups, will teach the students what they need tolearn.Many teachers have a hard time running the discussions. Deepdiscussions are often skipped due to lack of time.T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  32. 32. LEARN MORE ABOUT STANDARDS ONLINE32www.NextGenScience.orgwww.CoreStandards.orgwww.nasafacs.org/national-standards-home.htmlwww.iste.org/standardsT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  33. 33. RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS33New Hampshire Educators Online www.nheon.orgOPEN NH Professional Development www.opennh.orgNH Digital Resources Consortium www.nhdrc.orgNH Educational GIS Partnership www.nhedgis.orgNH Frameworks www.education.nh.gov/instruction/curriculumOpen Education Resources www.oercommons.orgThinkfinity www.thinkfinity.orgOffice of Educational Technology www.nheon.org/oetT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  34. 34. 34THE ENDT E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S
  35. 35. 35OFFICE OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGYContact InformationStan FreedaEducational Technology and Online Learning SpecialistNH SBAC Technology Readiness CoordinatorOffice of Educational TechnologyBureau of Accountability and AssessmentNew Hampshire Department of EducationStanley.Freeda@doe.nh.gov 603.271.5132www.education.nh.gov www.nheon.org www.opennh.org@T E A C H I N G T H A T S U P P O R T S T H E N E W H A M P S H I R E C O L L E G E A N D C A R E E R R E A D Y S T A N D A R D S

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