- Residential Life<br />Slide<br />Content Box<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />Marc...
- Residential Life<br />Residential Education, <br />Reconsidered<br />Stan Dura<br />Residential Life Coordinator<br />Do...
- Residential Life<br />Overview<br />Engaging residents in cognitive activity that better supports academic success<br />...
Look at Learning Theory, past and present
 Introduce the Reflective Engagement Model
Look at comparative data
Wrap up</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
- Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />Residential Education has evolved from:<br /><ul><li> Inherent and natu...
Parental in nature – rise and dominance of “in loco parentis”  (mid 1900’s)
 Practically non-existent  -  diversification of residents and demise of “in loco parentis” (1970’s, and 80’s)
 Pervasive, complex, and often superficial – plethora of contexts and models </li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<...
- Residential Life<br />Learning Theory<br />Learning theory has evolved from:<br /><ul><li> Elitist – (1700’s -1800’s) On...
Empiricism – (1800’s – 1900’s) The modern day Research University started with German empiricists, focusing on faculty res...
Introspectionism –  (late 1800’s – early 1900’s) Wundt began to focus on   “what is happening in the mind”; rebirth of int...
- Residential Life<br />Learning Theory<br />Learning theory has evolved from:<br /><ul><li> Behaviorism – (early 1900’s –...
 Cognitive Science  - (1960’s - ????) Recognized learning as a complex cognitive process involving perception, memory, emo...
 Socio-Cognitive – (2000’s - ????) Builds on Cognitive Science but emphasizes the influence of environmental, social, and ...
- Residential Life<br />What is going on in the mind?<br /><ul><li> Student affairs has done a great job of understanding ...
 But we know little of what happens inside the mind of the student as they are learning and developing.
 We know even less of howlearning and development occurs inside the mind.</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br /...
- Residential Life<br />What is going on in the mind?<br />Assimilation & Integration<br />Schema<br />Attention<br />Asso...
- Residential Life<br />What is going on in the mind?<br />“Cold Cognition” and “Hot Cognition”<br />Cognitive Belief Syst...
- Residential Life<br />How does it all fit together?<br />"If the brain were simple enough for us to understand it, we wo...
- Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />Sensory information either external or internal<br />Residential...
- Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />The Sensory Register<br /><ul><li>Gatekeeper of information that...
It evaluates incoming data based on prior experience, immediate goals, and prioritizes
Little if any conscious awareness</li></ul>Sensory information either external or internal<br />Sensory Register<br />Resi...
- Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />Immediate Memory <br />Provides a mechanism to attend to informa...
- Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />Working Memory <br />Provides a mechanism for extended concentra...
- Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />Long Term Storage /<br />Cognitive Belief System<br /><ul><li>Wh...
Information stored in LTS becomes integrated with our Cognitive Belief System, including our various identities or sense o...
- Residential Life<br />Putting it all together<br />Past Experience & goals<br />Sense & Meaning<br />Sensory information...
- Residential Life<br />What is going on in the mind?<br />A LOT!!!!<br />Meaningful learning involves a lot of mental act...
- Residential Life<br />Juxtaposition<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 201...
- Residential Life<br />What might this mean?<br /><ul><li>Expertise in student development does not equate to expertise i...
Student Staff, perhaps even Masters level staff, may not have the understanding of learning required to design effective l...
Traditional programs may be too superficial to consistently facilitate effective learning
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Residential Education Reconsidered.Acpa

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Re-examining traditional residential programming in light of contemporary theory and research; innovative programming model and delivery system highlighted.

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  • Foundations of contemporary learning theory can be seen in much of the philosophy of learning and the mind from this eraThus, understanding how students learn was not of primary importance, unless that was the professor’s field of interest to begin with.With Wundt’s work, combined with rebirth of interest in the philosophy of education, a call to focus on the mind of the individual, however it was largely ignored for some time
  • See, hear, smell, taste, touch, and THINK
  • Gatekeeper of information that our brain and mind attend toIt evaluates incoming data based on prior experience and prioritizesLittle if any conscious awareness
  • Provides a mechanism to attend to information in the short term without expending much energyActive for about 30 seconds
  • Provides a mechanism for extended concentration on a limited amount of information5-9 bits/chunksUp to 20 minutes (with some exceptions)NOTE: Augmentation
  • Long Term Storage /Cognitive Belief SystemWhat makes sense and what we find meaningful is committed to long term storage (LTS).Information stored in LTS becomes integrated with our Cognitive Belief System, including our sense of self or our Identity.
  • Meaningful learning – lots of mental activityTraditiona residential programing doesn’t account for many of these
  • How do our methods of educating students in our halls match with contemporary theory?What assumptions or beliefs might we need to re-assess?How can we re-think our approaches to educating our residents?
  • How do our methods of educating students in our halls match with contemporary theory?What assumptions or beliefs might we need to re-assess?How can we re-think our approaches to educating our residents?
  • How can we better reach every student in our programmatic efforts?How can we better engage them in meaningful and effective learning experiences?
  • Metacognitive – engaging them repeatedly in “thinking about their thinking” and constructing and re-constructing meaning around individual experiences.Social – engaging them in an extended and ongoing mentoring and social relationship.
  • We looked at learning outcomes for the UNLV General Education program and those developed for Student Affairs at UNLV that were based on Learning Reconsidered.We considered which of those were essential to being “self-directed.”
  • Cognitive Complexity Resident will identify, reflect on and analyze a problem/source of conflict from different perspectives, question his/her role, and develop potential solutions Resident will reflect on and integrate their experiences, values, beliefs, strengths, weaknesses, and their personal perspectives and style, and articulate themselves in terms of a unique, evolving and self directed cultural being.
  • Self Management and Relationship with Others Resident will identify and commit to personal goals in the areas of (a) Academic, emphasizing academic skills and career exploration and development, (b) Community Involvement and Leadership, (c) Personal Wellness, and (d) Time Management Resident will reflect on their successful and unsuccessful personal relationships with friends, faculty, and staff, and/or parents and family, and identify aspects that make those relationships meaningful, including what they themselves bring to their relationships.
  • Aesthetic Sensitivity and Cultural Competence Resident will explore different perspectives on local, national, and/or global issues and reflect on their interrelatedness and explore issues of leadership, civic engagement, and/or environmental and social justice ethics, etc. related to them. Resident will reflect on and integrate the values, beliefs, strengths, weaknesses, perspectives and styles of others, and articulate an appreciation for them in terms of unique, evolving and self directed cultural beings.
  • What’s the process? Specialized Training – facilitating conversations, goal setting, etc.Each month, RA’s engage a minimum of 60% of their residents in 1 on 1 conversations:Goal setting (Aug./Sept.), Problem solving (Oct.),Relationships and a review of their goals (Nov. / Dec.)Evaluation of goals and new goal setting (Jan. / Feb.)Perspective Taking and review of their goals (March)Goal evaluation (April / May)Staff report monthly on #’s, trends, outliers, and what they have gained
  • RA asks resident to have lunch with them RA asks how they did in school last year, are they happy with their grades, etc. RA asks what they want to improve on this year – turns those into goals RA asks them what they need to do to achieve the stated goals (and helps make goals more measurable, realistic, identify resources, etc.) RA asks about areas not mentioned (personal goals, involvement, etc.) RA shifts back to more informal topics and ends conversation RA notes the goals and follows up regularly (the follow ups are highly regarded)
  • Any questions?
  • Residential Education Reconsidered.Acpa

    1. 1. - Residential Life<br />Slide<br />Content Box<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    2. 2. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education, <br />Reconsidered<br />Stan Dura<br />Residential Life Coordinator<br />Doctoral Student, Educational Psychology<br />UNLV<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    3. 3. - Residential Life<br />Overview<br />Engaging residents in cognitive activity that better supports academic success<br /><ul><li> Look at Residential Education, past and present
    4. 4. Look at Learning Theory, past and present
    5. 5. Introduce the Reflective Engagement Model
    6. 6. Look at comparative data
    7. 7. Wrap up</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    8. 8. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />Residential Education has evolved from:<br /><ul><li> Inherent and naturalistic - Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard and Yale style “residential houses” (early 1900’s and prior)
    9. 9. Parental in nature – rise and dominance of “in loco parentis” (mid 1900’s)
    10. 10. Practically non-existent - diversification of residents and demise of “in loco parentis” (1970’s, and 80’s)
    11. 11. Pervasive, complex, and often superficial – plethora of contexts and models </li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    12. 12. - Residential Life<br />Learning Theory<br />Learning theory has evolved from:<br /><ul><li> Elitist – (1700’s -1800’s) Only the elite were considered worthy of education, and learning consisted of logic, religion, and philosophy via rote-learning
    13. 13. Empiricism – (1800’s – 1900’s) The modern day Research University started with German empiricists, focusing on faculty research and inductive reasoning more so than student learning
    14. 14. Introspectionism – (late 1800’s – early 1900’s) Wundt began to focus on “what is happening in the mind”; rebirth of interest in the philosophy of Education (i.e. John Dewey)</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    15. 15. - Residential Life<br />Learning Theory<br />Learning theory has evolved from:<br /><ul><li> Behaviorism – (early 1900’s – 1990’s) Learning was more or less strictly about environmental stimuli soliciting reflexive response. Little or no mental activity.
    16. 16. Cognitive Science - (1960’s - ????) Recognized learning as a complex cognitive process involving perception, memory, emotion, and active construction
    17. 17. Socio-Cognitive – (2000’s - ????) Builds on Cognitive Science but emphasizes the influence of environmental, social, and cultural factors on cognition</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    18. 18. - Residential Life<br />What is going on in the mind?<br /><ul><li> Student affairs has done a great job of understanding how students change over time, and we associate the long term change as learning.
    19. 19. But we know little of what happens inside the mind of the student as they are learning and developing.
    20. 20. We know even less of howlearning and development occurs inside the mind.</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    21. 21. - Residential Life<br />What is going on in the mind?<br />Assimilation & Integration<br />Schema<br />Attention<br />Associationism<br />Active Construction<br />Episodic memory<br />Metacognition<br />Immediate Memory<br />Dual Coding<br />Expertise reversal<br />Working memory<br />Dual processing<br />Transfer<br />Parallel Processing<br />“Cold Cognition” and “Hot Cognition”<br />Sensory Register<br />Visual/Spatial sketchpad<br />Cognitive Belief System<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    22. 22. - Residential Life<br />What is going on in the mind?<br />“Cold Cognition” and “Hot Cognition”<br />Cognitive Belief System<br />Motivation<br />Self-efficacy<br />Emotions<br />Problem Solving<br />Critical Thinking<br />Creativity<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    23. 23. - Residential Life<br />How does it all fit together?<br />"If the brain were simple enough for us to understand it, we would be too simple to understand it."<br />~Ken Hill <br />We’re still trying to figure the brain/mind out, but here is a basic part of it…<br />An Information Processing Model<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    24. 24. - Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />Sensory information either external or internal<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    25. 25. - Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />The Sensory Register<br /><ul><li>Gatekeeper of information that our brain and mind attend to
    26. 26. It evaluates incoming data based on prior experience, immediate goals, and prioritizes
    27. 27. Little if any conscious awareness</li></ul>Sensory information either external or internal<br />Sensory Register<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    28. 28. - Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />Immediate Memory <br />Provides a mechanism to attend to information in the short term without expending much energy<br />Active for just a few seconds<br />Sensory information either external or internal<br />Sensory Register<br />Immediate Memory<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    29. 29. - Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />Working Memory <br />Provides a mechanism for extended concentration on a limited amount of information<br />5-9 bits/chunks<br />Up to 30 Seconds, extended with attention up to ~20 minutes<br />Sensory information either external or internal<br />Sensory Register<br />Immediate Memory<br />Working Memory<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    30. 30. - Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />Long Term Storage /<br />Cognitive Belief System<br /><ul><li>What makes sense and what we find meaningful is committed to long term storage (LTS).
    31. 31. Information stored in LTS becomes integrated with our Cognitive Belief System, including our various identities or sense of self.</li></ul>Long Term Storage & Cognitive Belief System<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    32. 32. - Residential Life<br />Putting it all together<br />Past Experience & goals<br />Sense & Meaning<br />Sensory information either external or internal<br />Sensory Register<br />Immediate Memory<br />Working Memory<br />Long Term Storage & Cognitive Belief System<br />Information discarded or lost<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    33. 33. - Residential Life<br />What is going on in the mind?<br />A LOT!!!!<br />Meaningful learning involves a lot of mental activity and consideration of prior knowledge, mental models, active construction, and more.<br />Traditional residential programming, though, doesn’t account for many of these factors…<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    34. 34. - Residential Life<br />Juxtaposition<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    35. 35. - Residential Life<br />What might this mean?<br /><ul><li>Expertise in student development does not equate to expertise in learning
    36. 36. Student Staff, perhaps even Masters level staff, may not have the understanding of learning required to design effective learning experiences
    37. 37. Traditional programs may be too superficial to consistently facilitate effective learning
    38. 38. There are a host of factors that interact with whatever model we use that impact learning, and we do not understand much of them
    39. 39. This may help to explain the considerable variance in the effectiveness of LLP’s and residential programs</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    40. 40. - Residential Life<br />Discussion Pairs/Triads<br />Pair or triple up and discuss your thoughts on this so far.<br />Some questions to consider:<br />How do our methods of educating students in our halls match with contemporary theory?<br />What assumptions or beliefs might we need to re-assess?<br />How can we re-think our approaches to educating our residents?<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    41. 41. - Residential Life<br />Discussion<br />Quick report of some of the insights shared…<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    42. 42. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />The “Reflective Engagement Model” is founded on two questions:<br />How can we better reach every student in our programmatic efforts?<br />How can we better engage them in meaningful and effective learning experiences?<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    43. 43. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model <br />Involves 2 components<br />Metacognitive – engaging them repeatedly in “thinking about their thinking” and constructing and re-constructing meaning around individual experiences.<br />Focus is on processinstead of content.<br />Social – engaging them in an extended and ongoing mentoring and social relationship.<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    44. 44. - Residential Life<br />Application at UNLV<br />The Housing and Residential Life mission is centered on developing “self-directed individuals.”<br /><ul><li> We looked at learning outcomes for the UNLV General Education program and those developed for Student Affairs at UNLV that were based on Learning Reconsidered.
    45. 45. We considered which of those were essential to being “self-directed.”</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    46. 46. - Residential Life<br />Behavioral Learning Outcomes<br />Cognitive Complexity<br /><ul><li>Resident will identify, reflect on and analyze a problem/source of conflict from different perspectives, question his/her role, and develop potential solutions
    47. 47. Resident will reflect on and integrate their experiences, values, beliefs, strengths, weaknesses, and their personal perspectives and style, and articulate themselves in terms of a unique, evolving and self directed cultural being.</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    48. 48. - Residential Life<br />Learning Outcomes<br />Self Management and Relationship with Others<br /><ul><li>Resident will identify and commit to personal goals in the areas of (a) Academics, emphasizing academic skills and career exploration and development, (b) Community Involvement and Leadership, (c) Personal Wellness, and (d) Time Management
    49. 49. Resident will reflect on their successful and unsuccessful personal relationships with friends, faculty, and staff, and/or parents and family, and identify aspects that make those relationships meaningful, including what they themselves bring to their relationships.</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    50. 50. - Residential Life<br />Learning Outcomes<br />Aesthetic Sensitivity and Cultural Competence<br /><ul><li>Resident will explore different perspectives on local, national, and/or global issues and reflect on their interrelatedness and explore issues of leadership, civic engagement, and/or environmental and social justice ethics, etc. related to them.
    51. 51. Resident will reflect on and integrate the values, beliefs, strengths, weaknesses, perspectives and styles of others, and articulate an appreciation for them in terms of unique, evolving and self directed cultural beings.</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    52. 52. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />What’s the process?<br /><ul><li>Specialized Training – facilitating conversations, goal setting, etc.
    53. 53. Each month, RA’s engage a minimum of 60% of their residents in 1 on 1 conversations:
    54. 54. Goal setting (Aug./Sept.),
    55. 55. Problem solving (Oct.),
    56. 56. Relationships and a review of their goals (Nov. / Dec.)
    57. 57. Evaluation of goals and new goal setting (Jan. / Feb.)
    58. 58. Perspective Taking and review of their goals (March)
    59. 59. Goal evaluation (April / May)
    60. 60. Staff report monthly on #’s/names, trends, outliers, and what they have gained </li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    61. 61. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Sample “121”<br /><ul><li>RA asks resident to have lunch with them
    62. 62. RA asks how they did in school last year, are they happy with their grades, etc.
    63. 63. RA asks what they want to improve on this year – turns those into goals
    64. 64. RA asks them what they need to do to achieve the stated goals (and helps make goals more measurable, realistic, identify resources, etc.)
    65. 65. RA asks about areas not mentioned (personal goals, involvement, etc.)
    66. 66. RA shifts back to more informal topics and ends conversation
    67. 67. RA notes the goals and follows up regularly (the follow ups are highly regarded)</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    68. 68. - Residential Life<br />What does the data tell us?<br />Data is overwhelmingly positive<br /><ul><li>Floor communities are complex environments
    69. 69. There are numerous latent variables
    70. 70. And they are rarely accounted for in their entirety</li></ul>With that in mind…<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    71. 71. - Residential Life<br />What does the data tell us?<br />Resident EBI<br /><ul><li>Since REM’s inception (2006), Tonopah Complex has ranked consistently first or second in nearly every factor
    72. 72. Since 2007 Tonopah has ranked first in Overall Learning Experience and Overall Resident Satisfaction
    73. 73. In Overall Program Effectiveness, Tonopah Ranked:
    74. 74. Last in 2005
    75. 75. Second in 2006
    76. 76. Second in 2007
    77. 77. First in 2008
    78. 78. First in 2009</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    79. 79. - Residential Life<br />What does the data tell us?<br />Resident EBI<br /><ul><li>After the model was expanded to UCC, its 121 floors exceeded the complex mean in 7 of 11 factors
    80. 80. Suggests the success is not hall specific</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    81. 81. - Residential Life<br />What does the data tell us?<br />Staff EBI (2009)<br /><ul><li>Ranked first in 9 of 16 factors
    82. 82. Ranked 2nd in 4 </li></ul>Another way of looking at it:<br /><ul><li>Ranked first or second in 13 of 16 factors, including:
    83. 83. Job expectations, demands and compensation
    84. 84. Self knowledge and skills
    85. 85. Personal Competence
    86. 86. Overall Program effectiveness</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    87. 87. - Residential Life<br />What does the data tell us?<br />Floor Survey Data<br /><ul><li>2007 – 2010 Tonopah consistently ranked first or second in nearly every aspect related to satisfaction with RA, floor community and programming, including:
    88. 88. Enjoy living on the floor
    89. 89. RA earns their respect
    90. 90. RA tries to get to know them
    91. 91. RA provides programs and activities
    92. 92. fluctuates with success of complex council
    93. 93. Noise is acceptable (both floor and building)</li></ul>NOTE: Tonopah already ranked high in many in 2005 & 2006<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    94. 94. - Residential Life<br />What does the data tell us?<br />GPA<br /><ul><li>Between 2007 and 2010 it was the only Programming model that consistently exceeded the All Campus and All Housing GPA’s.
    95. 95. Fall 2008 – Spring 2009 greatest GPA change of all models (+.14)
    96. 96. Fall 2009 – Spring 2010 greatest GPA change of all models (-.14)*
    97. 97. In Spring 2010 there was a resident death inside Tonopah
    98. 98. The GPA decline was similar across all models in all buildings</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    99. 99. - Residential Life<br />What does the data tell us?<br />Reapplication and Retention<br /><ul><li>In 2010 and 2011, 47% and 48% of all reapplications were from Tonopah residents respectively
    100. 100. 2008-2009 + 2009-2010
    101. 101. Exceeded all programming models and the all housing average in terms of retention to Housing
    102. 102. 2008-2009
    103. 103. Exceeded Housing and campus average retention to UNLV
    104. 104. Out of those retained to Housing from 2009 – 2010 only 1 had not participated in a 121 interaction
    105. 105. frequency of participation explained 9% of the variance</li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    106. 106. - Residential Life<br />What does the data tell us?<br />Other<br /><ul><li> 95% of Tonopah residents participated in at least 1 interaction
    107. 107. 75% participated in 4 or more
    108. 108. RA candidates coming from 121 floors nearly twice the average of other floors
    109. 109. Staff turnover decreased significantly
    110. 110. Conduct decreased by between 1/3 and 1/4 or more
    111. 111. Went from 2nd highest to lowest in terms of # of incidents
    112. 112. Community Damages decreased by about 30% - 50% </li></ul>Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    113. 113. - Residential Life<br />?<br />Got Questions?<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />
    114. 114. - Residential Life<br />Slide<br />Content Box<br />Residential Education Reconsidered<br />ACPA 2011 Conference<br />March 30, 2011<br />

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