Reflective Engagement Model.Unlv

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Presentation on an innovative residential programming and delivery model, with greater depth in terms of theory, research, and specific details.

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  • See, hear, smell, taste, touch, and THINK
  • Gatekeeper of information that our brain and mind attend toIt evaluates incoming data based on prior experience and prioritizesLittle if any conscious awareness
  • Provides a mechanism to attend to information in the short term without expending much energyActive for about 30 seconds
  • Provides a mechanism for extended concentration on a limited amount of information5-9 bits/chunksUp to 20 minutes (with some exceptions)NOTE: Augmentation
  • Long Term Storage /Cognitive Belief SystemWhat makes sense and what we find meaningful is committed to long term storage (LTS).Information stored in LTS becomes integrated with our Cognitive Belief System, including our sense of self or our Identity.
  • Becomes conscious of sensory informationIdentifies strategies, tools, resources and makes plans related to the taskRecognizes how one is drawing on prior knowledge and concepts and recognizes how one is constructing meaning, drawing inferences, making assumptions, etc.Consciously uses new information to reconstruct concepts
  • We looked at learning outcomes for the UNLV General Education program and those developed for Student Affairs at UNLV that were based on Learning Reconsidered.We considered which of those were essential to being “self-directed.”
  • What’s the process? Specialized Training – facilitating conversations, goal setting, etc.Each month, RA’s engage a minimum of 60% of their residents in 1 on 1 conversations:Goal setting (Aug./Sept.), Problem solving (Oct.),Relationships and a review of their goals (Nov. / Dec.)Evaluation of goals and new goal setting (Jan. / Feb.)Perspective Taking and review of their goals (March)Goal evaluation (April / May)Staff report monthly on #’s, trends, outliers, and what they have gained
  • RA asks resident to have lunch with them RA asks how they did in school last year, are they happy with their grades, etc. RA asks what they want to improve on this year – turns those into goals RA asks them what they need to do to achieve the stated goals (and helps make goals more measurable, realistic, identify resources, etc.) RA asks about areas not mentioned (personal goals, involvement, etc.) RA shifts back to more informal topics and ends conversation RA notes the goals and follows up regularly (the follow ups are highly regarded)
  • Any questions?
  • Reflective Engagement Model.Unlv

    1. 1. - Residential Life<br />Slide<br />Content Box<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    2. 2. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Stan Dura<br />Residential Life Coordinator<br />Doctoral Student, Educational Psychology<br />UNLV<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    3. 3. - Residential Life<br />Overview<br />Engaging residents in cognitive activity that better supports academic success<br /><ul><li> Examine related Residential Education literature
    4. 4. Evaluate traditional programming in light of related literature
    5. 5. Consider related Theory on Learning and Pedagogy
    6. 6. Examine traditional programming in light of theory
    7. 7. Look at the current model, including RLC role, challenges, and training
    8. 8. Identify needs/opportunities for optimization for Fall
    9. 9. Wrap up</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    10. 10. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />Current models essentially based on:<br /><ul><li>Astin’s research on peer’s influence on learning and involvementoutcomes
    11. 11. Schroeder and Mable’s call for integration of learning experiences and themed experiences within the residence halls
    12. 12. These foundations of our philosophy and approach to Residential Education are essentially educational services</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    13. 13. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />Astin:<br /><ul><li> Peers exert tremendous influence on each other’s learning
    14. 14. Inputs > Environment > Outcomes</li></ul>Astin, A.W. (1984). Student Involvement: A developmental theory for higher education. Journal of College Student Personnel, 25, 297-308.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    15. 15. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />Schroeder and Mable:<br /><ul><li> Yale Stories
    16. 16. extended peer interaction is their education
    17. 17. first year and structure of experiences vital
    18. 18. students learn standards of behavior from each other
    19. 19. student initiated activities are preferred over institutional ones</li></ul>Schroeder, C. C. & Mable, P. (1994). Realizing the educational potential of residence halls. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    20. 20. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />Schroeder and Mable:<br /><ul><li>Called to integrate residential experiences with academic experiences
    21. 21. Two tiers of residential responsibilities
    22. 22. Management
    23. 23. Educational</li></ul>Schroeder, C. C. & Mable, P. (1994). Realizing the educational potential of residence halls. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    24. 24. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />Schroeder and Mable:<br /><ul><li> 6 Conditions that foster student learning</li></ul> Clear and coherent educational purposes <br /><ul><li>With complimentary policies and practices</li></ul> Holistic approach to development and learning<br /> High expectations for student performance<br /> Ample opportunities for student involvement <br /><ul><li>Sufficient number for majority of students, not just the few</li></ul> Scaled communities of meaning with ethics of caring and belonging<br /> Use of effective instructional approaches<br />Schroeder, C. C. & Mable, P. (1994). Realizing the educational potential of residence halls. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    25. 25. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />There’s a philosophical gap:<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    26. 26. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />Astin, Schroeder and Mable:<br /><ul><li> Struggled to fully bridge the philosophical gap between residential services and true residential education.</li></ul> The educational purposes were geared toward providing educational opportunities and environments, not specifically educating<br /> Called for effective instructional practices but failed to recognize inherent instructional flaws of traditional programming<br /> Emphasized larger scale involvement but couldn’t translate that effectively to suggest how residential programs could involve a majority of their residents<br /> Focused attention on fostering learning, not facilitating learning<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    27. 27. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />Key differences of the facilitating learning approach:<br /><ul><li>Experts design experiences
    28. 28. Experts and Peers facilitate learning
    29. 29. Process of learning is critical in designing experiences
    30. 30. Knowledge of learning theory and the process of learning
    31. 31. Crucial to design of experiences
    32. 32. Curricula and learning outcomes are the norm
    33. 33. Attempt to assess learning in and above maturation.</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    34. 34. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />Frameworks:<br /><ul><li> Frameworks for understanding student behavior and developmental trajectories
    35. 35. Chickering & Reisser
    36. 36. Multiple Identity Dev. models
    37. 37. Piaget
    38. 38. Kohlberg and Gilligan
    39. 39. Bandura
    40. 40. Kegan
    41. 41. Sanford
    42. 42. Perry
    43. 43. Baxter-Magolda
    44. 44. Kolb, Myers & Briggs
    45. 45. None of these address the cognitive processes involved in the learning that undergird our foundational models</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    46. 46. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />Frameworks:<br />These frameworks provide us a solid understanding how students change over time, and we consider the long term change as learning<br />We have done a good job of creating environments in which learning may occur<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    47. 47. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />Frameworks:<br />However, in the context of increasing accountability and competition for human and fiscal resources, environments that mayfacilitate learning will not suffice<br />We will be expected to apply effective instructional practices and design learning experiences that will facilitate learning.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    48. 48. - Residential Life<br />Residential Education<br />Frameworks:<br />In order to do that, we must have and master frameworks for learning processes and effective pedagogy. <br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    49. 49. - Residential Life<br />What does learning involve?<br />Assimilation & Integration<br />Schema<br />Attention<br />Associationism<br />Active Construction<br />Episodic memory<br />Metacognition<br />Immediate Memory<br />Dual Coding<br />Expertise reversal<br />Working memory<br />Dual processing<br />Transfer<br />Goal Orientation<br />Parallel Processing<br />Motivation<br />Sensory Register<br />Self-efficacy<br />Visual/Spatial sketchpad<br />Cognitive Belief System<br />Cognitive Load<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    50. 50. - Residential Life<br />What does learning involve?<br />Cognitive Belief System<br />“Cold Cognition” & “Hot Cognition”<br />Motivation<br />Identity<br />Emotions<br />Self-efficacy<br />Critical Thinking<br />Values<br />Creativity<br />Morals/Ethics<br />Problem Solving and reasoning <br />Metacognition and Reflection<br />And of course, reading, encoding, etc.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    51. 51. - Residential Life<br />What does learning involve?<br /><ul><li>If we don’t understand the cognitive processes involved, then we are unable to effectively account for them in our efforts to educate.
    52. 52. Result: Successes are inconsistent and washed out by failures</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    53. 53. - Residential Life<br />Research<br />Research on outcomes of Residential Education<br /><ul><li>Blimling
    54. 54. meta-analysis of residential education on academic performance</li></ul>No impact, positive or negative<br />Blimling, G. S. (1989). “A meta-analysis of the influence of college residence halls on academic performance.” Journal of College Student Development, 40, 610-623.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    55. 55. - Residential Life<br />Research<br />Research on outcomes of Residential Education<br /><ul><li>Pascarella & Terenzini
    56. 56. meta-analysis of residential experience’s impact on learning</li></ul>No consistent evidence of impact<br />Pascarella, E.T. & Terenzini, P.T. (2005). How college affects students: A third decade of research. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    57. 57. - Residential Life<br />Research<br />Research on outcomes of Residential Education<br /><ul><li> Salisbury & Goodman
    58. 58. analysis of Wabash National Study data on instructional practices that positively impact student learning and success</li></ul>characteristics of the practice not the activity.<br />Salisbury, M. & Goodman, K. (2009). “Educational practices that foster intercultural competence. Diversity & Democracy. 112(2), 12-13.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    59. 59. - Residential Life<br />Research<br />Research on outcomes of Residential Education<br /><ul><li> Wabash National Study
    60. 60. 2 essential characteristics of good practice shown to positively impact learning.</li></ul>Wrestling with different perspectives<br />Quality interactions and instructional design<br />Salisbury, M. & Goodman, K. (2009). “Educational practices that foster intercultural competence. Diversity & Democracy. 112(2), 12-13.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    61. 61. - Residential Life<br />Research<br />These results suggest:<br />Residential Education has essentially been<br />irrelevant<br />in the education of residential students.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    62. 62. - Residential Life<br />Research<br />There are many reasons for this:<br /><ul><li> Insufficient knowledge of theories on learning and pedagogy
    63. 63. Diversity of learners and contexts
    64. 64. affordances and constraints are different
    65. 65. Content lacks coherent structure
    66. 66. Current models engage only a minority</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    67. 67. - Residential Life<br />Research<br />An Analogy:<br />Developmental experts facilitating learning<br />is akin to<br />expert drivers designingan engine.<br />Our expertise has not been in facilitating learning but rather in understanding developmental patterns and supporting environments<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    68. 68. - Residential Life<br />Why we struggle to show impact?<br />≠<br />Expertise in Student Development<br />Expertise in Learning and Teaching<br />Both are necessary to educate well<br />(perhaps especially so outside the classroom)<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    69. 69. - Residential Life<br />Why we struggle to show impact?<br />To successfully educate students<br />(particularly in our unique and complex context)<br />we need to be more<br />attuned to learning and pedagogy.<br /><ul><li> We need corresponding theories and frameworks to help us understand how learning occurs
    70. 70. We need to find ways to integrate this knowledge and apply it to our unique contexts.</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    71. 71. - Residential Life<br />A Framework for learning<br />"If the brain were simple enough for us to understand it, we would be too simple to understand it."<br />~Ken Hill <br />Much is still a mystery, but here are the basic cognitive aspects of learning…<br />Information Processing Model – A Framework<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    72. 72. - Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />Sensory information either external or internal<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    73. 73. - Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />The Sensory Register<br /><ul><li>Gatekeeper of information that our brain and mind attend to
    74. 74. It evaluates incoming data based on prior experience, immediate goals, and prioritizes
    75. 75. Little if any conscious awareness</li></ul>Sensory information either external or internal<br />Sensory Register<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    76. 76. - Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />Immediate Memory <br />Provides a mechanism to attend to information in the short term without expending much energy<br />Active for just a few seconds<br />Sensory information either external or internal<br />Sensory Register<br />Immediate Memory<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    77. 77. - Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />Working Memory <br />Provides a mechanism for extended concentration on a limited amount of information<br />5-9 bits/chunks<br />Up to 30 Seconds, extended with attention up to ~20 minutes<br />Sensory information either external or internal<br />Sensory Register<br />Immediate Memory<br />Working Memory<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    78. 78. - Residential Life<br />Information Processing Model<br />Long Term Storage /<br />Cognitive Belief System<br /><ul><li>What makes sense and what we find meaningful is committed to long term storage (LTS).
    79. 79. Information stored in LTS becomes integrated with our Cognitive Belief System, including our various identities or senses of self.</li></ul>Long Term Storage & Cognitive Belief System<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    80. 80. - Residential Life<br />Putting it all together<br />Sense and Meaning<br />Past Experience & Goals<br />Sensory information either external or internal<br />Sensory Register<br />Immediate Memory<br />Working Memory<br />Long Term Storage & Cognitive Belief System<br />Information discarded or lost<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    81. 81. - Residential Life<br />Teaching and Learning<br />Three approaches to Teaching<br /> Transmission Approach (Knowledge Centered)<br /> Acquisition Approach (Student Centered)<br /> Deeper Learning Approach (Conceptual Change)<br />Light, G., Calkins, S., and Cox, R. (2009). Learning and teaching in Higher Education: The reflective professional. London: Sage Publications, Ltd.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    82. 82. - Residential Life<br />Teaching and Learning<br />Transmission Approach<br /><ul><li>Intention is to distribute content (hope it is learned)
    83. 83. Teaching is distinctly separate from learning
    84. 84. Learning deficit lies with learner</li></ul>Light, G., Calkins, S., and Cox, R. (2009). Learning and teaching in Higher Education: The reflective professional. London: Sage Publications, Ltd.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    85. 85. - Residential Life<br />Teaching and Learning<br />Acquisition or Student Centered Approach<br /><ul><li>Intent is to help students acquire content
    86. 86. Teaching automatically causes learning
    87. 87. Learning deficit lies in communication between teacher-student</li></ul>Light, G., Calkins, S., and Cox, R. (2009). Learning and teaching in Higher Education: The reflective professional. London: Sage Publications, Ltd.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    88. 88. - Residential Life<br />Teaching and Learning<br />Deeper Learning Approach<br /><ul><li> Intent is to engage students in reconstructing content themselves.
    89. 89. Teaching is by-product of learning
    90. 90. If learning does not occur, did teaching?
    91. 91. Learning deficit lies within shared roles within learning environment</li></ul>Light, G., Calkins, S., and Cox, R. (2009). Learning and teaching in Higher Education: The reflective professional. London: Sage Publications, Ltd.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    92. 92. - Residential Life<br />Teaching and Learning<br />Three approaches to Learning<br /> Surface Approach<br /> Strategic Approach<br /> Deeper Learning Approach<br />Entwistle, N. J. and Ramsden, P. (1983). Understanding student learning. London: Croom Helm.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    93. 93. - Residential Life<br />Teaching and Learning<br />Surface Approach<br /><ul><li>Intention is to just get by; get it over with
    94. 94. no consideration of purpose or strategy
    95. 95. i.e. no metacognition
    96. 96. Unrelated bits of information
    97. 97. Difficult to make sense of new ideas</li></ul>Entwistle, N. J. and Ramsden, P. (1983). Understanding student learning. London: Croom Helm.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    98. 98. - Residential Life<br />Teaching and Learning<br />Strategic Approach<br /><ul><li>Intention is to please the instructor and achieve highest possible grade
    99. 99. Some metacognition to organize content for reproduction (not necessarily understanding)
    100. 100. Effective time management, consistent effort
    101. 101. New ideas are easy if they fit the current structure</li></ul>Entwistle, N. J. and Ramsden, P. (1983). Understanding student learning. London: Croom Helm.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    102. 102. - Residential Life<br />Teaching and Learning<br />Deeper Learning Approach<br /><ul><li>Intention is to understand ideas for themselves
    103. 103. Emphasis on metacognition and critical thinking
    104. 104. Relating ideas, looking for patterns
    105. 105. examining arguments, checking assumptions, etc.
    106. 106. Active interest and participation
    107. 107. Readily integrates new ideas, regardless of fit</li></ul>Entwistle, N. J. and Ramsden, P. (1983). Understanding student learning. London: Croom Helm.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    108. 108. - Residential Life<br />Teaching and Learning<br />The goal is to move<br />both ourselves and residents<br />to more of a<br />deeper learning approach<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    109. 109. - Residential Life<br />Bloom’s Taxonomy:<br />A framework for learning<br />activity and pedagogy<br />Evaluation<br />Synthesis<br />Analysis<br />Application<br />Comprehension<br />Knowledge<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    110. 110. - Residential Life<br />Bloom’s Taxonomy:<br />Adapted framework for<br />learning activity and<br />pedagogy<br />Create<br />Integrate<br />Meaningful Learning<br />(Transform information)<br />Analyze<br />Apply<br />Reproduce<br />Rote Learning<br />(Reproduce info)<br />Remember<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    111. 111. - Residential Life<br />Learning Activity<br />Rote learning or lower level activity:<br /><ul><li>Information is much less likely to be remembered
    112. 112. Information is even less likely to be integrated
    113. 113. Relationships and meaning are often ignored
    114. 114. Bread and butter of the “Transmission Approach” </li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    115. 115. - Residential Life<br />Learning Activity<br />Meaningful learning or higher order activity:<br /><ul><li>Information is much more likely to be remembered
    116. 116. Information is more likely to be integrated
    117. 117. Relationships and meaning are emphasized
    118. 118. Bread and butter of the “Deeper Learning Approach” </li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    119. 119. - Residential Life<br />Where do we fit?<br />Create<br />Integrate<br />Meaningful Learning<br />(Transform information)<br />REM Model<br />Analyze<br />Apply<br />Some Specialized Programming<br />Reproduce<br />Rote Learning<br />(Reproduce info)<br />Traditional Programming<br />Remember<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    120. 120. - Residential Life<br />What do we address directly?<br />(with a majority of our residents?)<br />Cognitive Belief System<br />“Cold Cognition” & “Hot Cognition”<br />Motivation<br />Identity<br />Emotions<br />Self-efficacy<br />Critical Thinking<br />Values<br />Creativity<br />Morals/Ethics<br />Problem Solving<br />Metacognition and Reflection<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    121. 121. - Residential Life<br />What do we address directly?<br />(with a majority of our residents?)<br />None of the above<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    122. 122. - Residential Life<br />What do we address directly?<br />(with a majority of our residents?)<br />Even with our mission: “…self directed individuals…”<br /><ul><li> We cannot say that we directly attend to any specific aspects of being self directed with a majority our residents…</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    123. 123. - Residential Life<br />What can we attend to directly?<br />(with a majority of our residents?)<br />The REM model originated from three questions<br />How can we better engage every resident in our educational efforts<br />How can we make those efforts more meaningful and effective learning experiences?<br />How would we best deliver it?<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    124. 124. - Residential Life<br />Juxtaposition<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    125. 125. - Residential Life<br />Juxtaposition<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    126. 126. - Residential Life<br />Juxtaposition<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    127. 127. - Residential Life<br />Juxtaposition<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    128. 128. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model <br />Foundations<br />Metacognitive in nature – engaging them repeatedly in “thinking about their thinking” and constructing and re-constructing meaning around individual experiences.<br /><ul><li>Focus is on processinstead of content.</li></ul>Based on 3 related theories<br />Metacognition – reflective analysis of their thinking<br />Schema – construction/reconstruction of conceptualizations<br />Vygotsky – “Zone of Proximal Development” – peer mentoring within social context to extend learner’s capabilities<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    129. 129. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model <br />Metacognition - awareness of and conscious control over one’s thinking and processing of information<br /><ul><li> “Executive Control” – allows for conscious control
    130. 130. Planning
    131. 131. Monitoring
    132. 132. Evaluating
    133. 133. (recreating/reconstructing)
    134. 134. REM focuses on Evaluating and Reconstructing for the most part</li></ul>Flavell, J. H. (1979). Metacognition and cognitive monitoring: A new area of cognitive-developmental inquiry. American Psychologist, 34, 906 - 911. <br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    135. 135. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model <br />Executive Control<br />Metacognition<br />Flavell, J. H. (1979). Metacognition and cognitive monitoring: A new area of cognitive-developmental inquiry. American Psychologist, 34, 906 - 911. <br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    136. 136. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model <br />Schema - conceptual structure for understanding related information and/or procedures<br />Take a quick look at this next slide…<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    137. 137. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model <br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    138. 138. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model <br />Schema - conceptual structure for understanding related information and/or procedures<br />What kind of animal do you think it is?<br />Why?<br />Let’s take a closer look…<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    139. 139. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model <br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    140. 140. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model <br />Schema - conceptual structure for understanding related information and/or procedures<br />Use a sheet of paper and draw a pirate ship<br />Compare drawings… What was different? Why?<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    141. 141. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model <br />Schema - conceptual structure for understanding related information and/or procedures<br />That structure influences what sensory information we attend to, how we process and integrate that information, and even fills in gaps when we cannot recall the original information<br />Anderson, R. C. (1977). The notion of schemata and the educational enterprise. In R. C Anderson, R.J. Spiro, & W. E. Montague (Eds.), Schooling and the acquisition of knowledge. Hillsdale, N.J.: Erlbaum.<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    142. 142. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model <br />Zone of Proximal Development - That area just beyond the learner’s capabilities such that, with assistance, the learner is able to extend his/her capabilities.<br />Not capable<br />With Help<br />Zone of Proximal Development<br />Alone<br />Designing learning within this area is more effective<br />Vygotsky, L.S. (1978). Mind and society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    143. 143. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model <br />The REM model engages residents in structured experiences that:<br /><ul><li> are grounded in relevant theory
    144. 144. mimic interactions with staff and faculty
    145. 145. utilize higher order thinking skills
    146. 146. assist residents in evaluating their conceptualizations</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    147. 147. - Residential Life<br />Application at UNLV<br />The Housing and Residential Life mission is centered on developing <br />“self-directed individuals.”<br /><ul><li> What is essential to being “self-directed”?</li></ul>Looking at:<br /><ul><li> UNLV General Education Outcomes
    148. 148. Co-Curricular Agenda</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    149. 149. - Residential Life<br />Behavioral Learning Outcomes<br />Cognitive Complexity – the ability to think critically and problem solve<br />Self Management and Relationship with Others – the ability to:<br /><ul><li> manage one’s behavior and performance
    150. 150. establish and evaluate one’s relationships</li></ul>Aesthetic Sensitivity and Cultural Competence – the ability to recognize and appreciate cultural practices and differences<br />(see handout)<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    151. 151. - Residential Life<br />Timeline and Progression<br />Aug.-Sept. – Goal setting<br />October – Problem Solving<br />Nov.-Dec. – Relationships and Goal Review<br />Jan.-Feb. – Goal Review, Goal Setting<br />March – Multiple Perspective Taking<br />April-May – Goal Evaluation<br />(see handouts)<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    152. 152. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />What’s the process?<br /><ul><li>Semi-specialized Training – facilitating conversations, goal setting, etc.
    153. 153. Each month, RA’s engage a minimum of 60% of their residents in 1 on 1 conversations:
    154. 154. Goal setting (Aug./Sept.),
    155. 155. Problem solving (Oct.),
    156. 156. Relationships and a review of their goals (Nov. / Dec.)
    157. 157. Evaluation of goals and new goal setting (Jan. / Feb.)
    158. 158. Perspective Taking and review of their goals (March)
    159. 159. Goal evaluation (April / May)
    160. 160. Staff report monthly on #’s/names, trends, outliers, and what they have gained </li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    161. 161. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Sample “121”<br /><ul><li>RA asks resident to have lunch with them
    162. 162. RA asks how they did in school last year, are they happy with their grades, etc.
    163. 163. RA asks what they want to improve on this year – turns those into goals
    164. 164. RA asks them what they need to do to achieve the stated goals (and helps make goals more measurable, realistic, identify resources, etc.)
    165. 165. RA asks about areas not mentioned (personal goals, involvement, etc.)
    166. 166. RA shifts back to more informal topics and ends conversation
    167. 167. RA notes the goals and follows up regularly (the follow ups are highly regarded)</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    168. 168. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />RLC – RA 1 on 1’s<br /><ul><li>RLC Models the process of social dialogue and guiding the discussion towards goals
    169. 169. Solicits perspectives
    170. 170. Respects, and overtly welcomes, opposite perspectives
    171. 171. Offers different perspectives (devils advocate, deeper contexts, etc.)
    172. 172. including how to improve technique, strategy, etc. with 121s
    173. 173. Challenges assumptions and argument logic
    174. 174. in both RA and RLC’s given perspectives
    175. 175. Facilitates and praises critical reflection
    176. 176. Attempts to articulate thought processes to make “metacognition” overt</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    177. 177. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />What is required of RLCs for model to be successful<br /><ul><li>Modeling and making explicit metacognitive processes
    178. 178. Understand the concepts and theory that undergirds the model and LO’s
    179. 179. Helping staff learn how to guide conversations more intentionally around LO’s
    180. 180. Helping staff learn how to recognize and set good goals and counsel residents on the same
    181. 181. Modeling openness to different ideas, even those the RLC disregards
    182. 182. Recognize where staff are struggling and develop ways to scaffold learning
    183. 183. Being overt and explicit in following up
    184. 184. asking residents about conversations with staff
    185. 185. ensure appropriate topics are being covered (staff can get too off topic)</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    186. 186. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Struggles for staff<br /><ul><li>Making the formal seem informal
    187. 187. Being metacognitively aware of conversations and intentionally guiding them
    188. 188. Knowing how to articulate their thought processes and make them explicit for residents to “see” and learn from
    189. 189. Time management
    190. 190. It can take much more time for staff to track down residents
    191. 191. It requires more precise time management to accommodate residents’ time
    192. 192. Procrastination still difficult to overcome
    193. 193. Overcoming resistance or disinterest on part of residents during interactions
    194. 194. Note taking, record keeping
    195. 195. Recognizing opportunities to follow up and connect residents</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    196. 196. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />What is required of Staff for model to be successful<br /><ul><li> “Mentor to many” perspective vs. “policy enforcer” or “programmer”
    197. 197. Capacity for intimacy, listening, and metacognition
    198. 198. Competence in being able to strategize and intentionally guide conversations
    199. 199. Flexible time-management and interpersonal skills
    200. 200. Understanding of the learning outcomes and goals month to month
    201. 201. Openness to different ideas, even those the staff disregards
    202. 202. Ability to recognize patterns and opportunities
    203. 203. Resources related to goals, interests, problems, needs, etc.
    204. 204. Patterns of behavior and possible consequences
    205. 205. Similarities and differences between residents</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    206. 206. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Things we’ve changed<br /><ul><li>Structure of 121’s
    207. 207. allowed for greater flexibility (i.e. partial small groups, less formal, etc.)
    208. 208. Removed the Cultural Identity learning outcome
    209. 209. Combined Nov. and December leaving 6 total, resulting in:
    210. 210. combining of Relationship reflection with Fall academic goal review
    211. 211. Declined to introduce the rubric
    212. 212. Relaxed scripts
    213. 213. Provided scaffolding materials (i.e. sample introductory, probing and challenging questions, etc.)</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    214. 214. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Opportunities for enhancement<br /><ul><li> Learning Outcomes and Assessment
    215. 215. Tie in with Floor Meeting content
    216. 216. Training
    217. 217. Curricula development
    218. 218. Academic At Risk Intervention
    219. 219. Branding</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    220. 220. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Learning Outcomes<br /><ul><li> We can adapt the learning outcomes
    221. 221. Specific focuses (First Year, Academic Skills, Hotel Major, etc.)
    222. 222. SUGGEST: Focus more specifically on Critical Thinking
    223. 223. Provides direct leverage to academic performance and problem solving (+ more)
    224. 224. Flexible entry points (current events, contemporary issues, problem solving, etc.)
    225. 225. Simplifies model and activities for staff
    226. 226. Can simplify training, too. (lots of structure, texts, resources for training)
    227. 227. Provide a clearer topic to assess (many assessments of Critical Thinking)</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    228. 228. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Assessment (currently weakest aspect)<br /><ul><li>Assessment and Evaluation
    229. 229. Evaluation of individual 121’s
    230. 230. SUGGEST: Randomly select 1 staff each week to complete 5 evals
    231. 231. Develop short corresponding eval around quality, outcomes, etc.
    232. 232. SUGGEST: Require goals to be written down, 1 for staff, 1 for resident
    233. 233. Direct assessment of student learning
    234. 234. SUGGEST: Simplify matrix and use each time (ZPD and strategy).
    235. 235. SUGGEST: Use/create instrument for pre and post (or other methodology)
    236. 236. We use that data to track growth from year to year
    237. 237. Develop matrix, either Student Voice matrix, Google Spreadsheet, etc.
    238. 238. Tie in with overall departmental plan
    239. 239. Need to determine what data needed and get systems in place</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    240. 240. - Residential Life<br />Example of Simplified Matrix Eval<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    241. 241. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Learning Outcomes and Assessment <br /><ul><li>4 Questions </li></ul>What do we really want students to achieve? (1-5 LO’s no more)<br />How will their residential experience help them achieve it?<br />How will we know if they achieved it?<br />How will we know if our effort contributed to their achieving it?<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    242. 242. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Tie in with Floor Meeting Content<br /><ul><li>Opportunity to structure floor meetings to provide for
    243. 243. Tie-in with 121 topics
    244. 244. Multicultural dialogues
    245. 245. Ongoing Standards
    246. 246. Intentional community building activities
    247. 247. Allows for evaluation of floor meetings
    248. 248. Further corrals our efforts in a more cohesive and intentional direction</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    249. 249. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Training<br /><ul><li>Conceptual Development
    250. 250. Educators/Mentors vs. Policy Enforcers, Programmers, etc.
    251. 251. Learning Outcomes
    252. 252. Dualism vs. Relativism (i.e. Dualistic staff have more difficulty)
    253. 253. Skill Development
    254. 254. Metacognition (maybe Critical Thinking)
    255. 255. Strategic facilitation of conversations
    256. 256. Ties with Helping Skills
    257. 257. Evaluation
    258. 258. Application
    259. 259. Application of Helping Skills within 121 context
    260. 260. Application of strategic facilitation of conversations
    261. 261. Problem based applications (i.e. cases studies, comprehensive application)</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    262. 262. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Curricula Development<br /><ul><li>Opportunity to develop a curricula for our Residential Education to help focus efforts
    263. 263. Flexible
    264. 264. Same across halls/floors
    265. 265. Complexes can develop individual curricula based on complex/floor
    266. 266. Provides better communication
    267. 267. with administration (clear purpose, goals, etc.)
    268. 268. with academic units (speaking shared language)
    269. 269. Curricula would drive learning outcomes and 121 questions </li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    270. 270. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Academic At Risk Intervention<br /><ul><li>Opportunity to intervene with identified at risk students
    271. 271. Can develop Fall assessment
    272. 272. Can use LASSI
    273. 273. Others…</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    274. 274. - Residential Life<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />Branding<br /><ul><li>Opportunity to develop a unique and effective brand
    275. 275. can help communicate its purpose and/or methods
    276. 276. can help create a sense of connection between complexes
    277. 277. can help establish an identity for the residential experience
    278. 278. can help with marketing</li></ul>Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    279. 279. - Residential Life<br />?<br />Got Questions?<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />
    280. 280. - Residential Life<br />Title<br />Content Box<br />Reflective Engagement Model<br />UNLV HRL Presentation<br />June 1, 2011<br />Stan Dura<br />© 2011<br />

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