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Exterior Portland Cement Plaster Assemblies
 

Exterior Portland Cement Plaster Assemblies

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    Exterior Portland Cement Plaster Assemblies Exterior Portland Cement Plaster Assemblies Presentation Transcript

    • TECHNICAL SERVICES INFORMATION BUREAU
    • Exterior Plaster Wall and Ceilings, Fire-Resistive & Drywall Assemblies: Presented by the Technical Services Information Bureau . . . Darin Coats Bryan Stanley M ichael M . Logue
    • WESTERN WALL & CEILING CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION TECHNICAL SERVICES INFORMATION BUREAU
    • •Administrative Functions •Multi Employer Bargaining Agent •Trustee of Pension, Health & Welfare •Apprenticeship Programs •Member Benefits •Union Contract Administrator •Technical Services •Trade Promotion •Trade Education •Industry Standards •Field Inspections and Reports •Code Development •Technical Committees and Councils •Detailing – Spec Review •Preconstruction – Mock Ups
    • Who we are … a little history  WWCCA / TSIB can be traced back to 1929, when we were called the Contracting Plasterers’ Association Southern California CPASC.
    • 1929 – 1988 … The original state association board members
    • Materials suppliers and manufacturers have long been an integral part of the Association
    • Back then plaster was applied over strips of wood called “wood lath”
    • Advancements in manufacturing brought new materials for lathing Early metal lath provided better keying for the plaster scratch coat
    • As the industry grew, so to did the need for technical services. Walt Pruter started the Plastering Information Bureau in 1952 Walt Pruter Clyde Bell Jim Rose Harold McKeller Walt Pruter, was a WWII carrier pilot, an architect from the Illinois Institute of Technology, and an architectural representative from United States Gypsum prior to his career with the Bureau
    • Twelve years later Walt turned over the Plastering Information Bureau to J.R. “Dick” Gorman Dick Gorman, was an Army Captain and an Architect from Rice University before he came to us from Kaiser Gypsum
    • Dick was instrumental in the development of the Data Guide and Reference Spec’s, and the original stucco textures and finishes brochure …
    • In the 50’s, southern California began a housing boom and ushered in the era of the tract home. Stucco (exterior) and Gypsum Plaster (interior) were used extensively.
    • The advent of the tract home in the 50’s put many Southern California plastering contractors on the map. Past Presidents Geo. M. Raymond C. B. Scott
    • Commercial and Residential markets continued to grow into the 1960’s and plaster was there to meet the growing demands of designers
    • As the complexity of structures increased, so to did the need for a reliable, accurate source of information. In 1977, Walt Pruter, Clay Johnson and Sam Jaffe published the Plaster/Metal Framing Systems/Lath Manual. First Edition Second Edition
    • In 1987, Dick Gorman, Walt Pruter, Jim Rose and Sam Jaffe published the 3rd edition of the manual, which now contained drywall technical information, and called it the Drywall and Plaster Systems Manual – AKA “The Manual”
    • TSIB Staff and Consultants  1952 - 2008 Walt Pruter  1964 J.R. “Dick” Gorman – Senior Consultant, field inspections from LA – to San Luis Obispo  2000 Michael Logue – Director - Oversees all Technical Services. ASTM/ICC/ACI/AIA/AWCI/FCA/DWFC/WCWCI  2002 Darin Coats – Technical Advisor – Specializes in Drywall and Drywall Finishing, and Ceramic Tile Bases DWFC/CTIOA/WCWCI  2005 Bryan Stanley – Technical Advisor – Specializes in Acrylic and EIFS – Runs the San Diego membership meetings – CSI/AIA/WCWCI
    • TSIB – What we do  Trade Promotion  Trade Education – AIA Accredited Continuing Education  Research and Development of Industry Standards  Third Party Field Inspections and Reports  Code Development  Technical Committees and Councils  Architectural Consulting - Details and Specifications  Preconstruction and Mock-up meetings  Contractor – Architect – Inspector Liaison
    • Trade Promotion 2002 Construction Specifications Institute Annual Trade Show – Las Vegas, NV
    • Education
    • Research and Development of Industry Standards  Application of lath  Lath trims and screeds  Suspended ceilings  Plaster mixes  Weather-Resistive Barriers  Plaster Over Masonry – Direct Applied  Metal Stud Framing  Gypsum Sheathing  Fire Rated Assemblies  Drywall Finishing
    • Third Party Field Inspections 100_2754.mov
    • Code Development  California Building Standards Commission  International Code Council  ASTM  ANSI
    • Technical Committees and Councils  ASTM C -11  American Concrete Institute –  Steel Stud Manufacturers Association  AWCI Technical Committees  Portland Cement Association  Drywall Finishing Council  Western Conference of Wall & Ceiling Institutes  Ceramic Tile Institute of America
    • Plans and Specifications Reviewing  Cedars Sinai – North Care Tower  White Memorial  Arcadia Methodist Tower  Hoag – Newport Beach, CA  Twin Cities – Templeton, CA  Santa Barbara Hospital  Kaiser Sand Canyon  Kaiser Panorama City  Orange County Performing Arts Center  Pierce College
    • PORTLAND CEMENT PLASTER
    • Plaster is an ancient material, durable, inexpensive and versatile material...
    • HISTORIC PLASTER OVER MASONRY –OLD MILL - SAN MARINO, CA
    • HISTORIC PLASTER OVER MASONRY –OLD MILL - SAN MARINO, CA
    • SIMULATION OF AFRICAN NATIVE MUD PLASTERING – SAN DIEGO WILD ANIMAL PARK
    • SIMULATED STONE CASTLE – MODIFIED PLASTER SYSTEM – LEGOLAND
    • SIMULATED STONE FIREPLACE – MODIFIED PLASTER SYSTEM – LEGOLAND
    • EXTERIOR PLASTER WALL AND CEILING SYSTEMS - PROGRAM OUTLINE •MASONRY SUBSTRATES •WOOD FRAMING •METAL STUD FRAMING •PLASTER CEILINGS •EXTERIOR GYP. SHEATHING •WEATHER-RESISTANT BARRIERS •FLASHING •LATH AND ACCESSORIES •SCRATCH & BROWN • FINISHES • CONTINUOUS INSULATION
    • MASONRY
    • Cast-in-Place Concrete / CMU
    • Cast-in-P lace Concrete  Cured 28 days – ACI 308R  Clean  ¼ in 10’
    • Cast-in-P lace Concret
    • Apply lath and 3 coat when matching fram ed and lathed w alls If Direct Applied, apply bonder evenly Document Point / Patch by others
    • Cast-in-Place Concrete Bond Breakers “A1.6.2 Form release compounds shall be compatible with plaster or be completely removed from surfaces to receive plaster.” - ASTM C 926 Sodium Silicate bond breaker will dissipate and can be direct applied with plaster. Petroleum based, oil / paraffin etc. cannot be direct applied over.
    • M EDI UM DENSI TY OVER LAY
    • Cast-in-place Concrete – DIRECT APPLY
    • Concrete Masonry Units Yorba Linda High School – Perlite Plastering 2009
    • CM U  Joints Cut Flush  90 % Loaded  Fully Cured  Clean  ¼ in. Alignment
    • CONCRETE MASONRY UNITS – DIRECT APPLY
    • WOOD
    • Wood
    • Wood •Locate CJ - Vertical backing
    • Wood •Sill Plate Offset
    • Wood •Plywood Gaped 1/8 in.
    • SPACER NAIL – NO 1/8” GAP
    • Wood •2 Layers grade “D”
    • ROLL FORMED METAL
    • Roll Formed Steel
    • Roll Formed Steel •16 Gage - .0549” •16” O.C. Vertical •13 ½” – 12” Ceilings •L/360 •ASTM C 1063 (NLB) – ¼ in. – 10’ •ASTM C 1007 (LB) – 1/8 in. – 10’
    • Steel Framing Construction Basics Member Nomenclature
    • A primer on Nomenclature  Steel framing industry moving away from using the term “gauge” to refer to thickness of material. •Thickness expressed in “mils”: •One mil = 1/1000 inch. •Basic information is on inside front cover of SSMA catalog.
    • Standardization 600 S 162 - 54 6” member Stud or Joist 1-5/8” Min. base metal depth with Lips Flange thickness in mils (1.625”) (0.054” = 54 mils) • Steel Members are Standardized Using a Universal Designation System
    • Member Depth:  Measured on studs: outside flanges.  Measured on tracks: inside flanges.
    • AT LEAST ONE CREATIVE MIND EVEN LOOKED BEYOND CONVENTIONIAL MATERIALS FOR THEIR PLASTER SUBSTRATE…
    • …CHAIN LINK FENCE !! !! ! CHAIN LINK FENCE !
    • 8 or 9 Gage Hanger Wire – 3 ½’ O. C. 1 ½” CRC Main Runners – 3 ½’ O.C. ¾” CRC Cross Furring – 13 ½” O.C. 3.4 lb/sy Exp. Metal Lath – tie wire Control Joints – 100 SF – Provide Backing Good plaster starts w ith good lathing
    • P laster Ceilings Suspended Iron / Lath / Tie Wire No Rib Lath No Sheathing / WRB DEFS – a good substitute
    • SUSPENDED CEILINGS SADDLE TIES
    • DON’T USE SHEATHING AND WEATHER-RESISTANT BARRIERS
    • PLASTER CEILINGS
    • EXTERIOR GYP. SHEATHING - METAL STUD FRAMING
    • WHY USE IT? •PROVIDES BACKING AND UNIFORM FLATNESS •ELIMINATES MOST VERTICAL LINES •PROVIDES ATTACHMENT FOR BUILDING PAPER •REQUIRED FOR RATED CONSTRUCTION
    • EXTERIOR SHEATHING - METAL STUD FRAMING WHY USE IT? •PROVIDES BACKING AND UNIFORM FLATNESS
    • EXTERIOR SHEATHING - METAL STUD FRAMING WHY USE IT? A: ELIMINATES MOST VERTICAL LINES
    • EXTERIOR SHEATHING - METAL STUD FRAMING WHY USE IT? A: MAKES DEEP COLORS MORE CONSISTENT
    • PROVIDES ATTACHMENT FOR BUILDING PAPER
    • EXTERIOR SHEATHING WHY USE SHEATHING? •PUTS GYPSUM IN THE PLASER SYSTEM FOR RATED SYSTEMS
    • WEATHER-RESISTING BARRIER The IBC & CBC use the term “W eather-Resisting Barrier“ in the definition of “Ex terior W all Covering “ (§1402) A Weather-Resisting Barrier is comprised of one or more Water-Resistive Barriers W RB The WRB’s work together to create a weather-resistant exterior wall envelope (§ 1403.2)
    • What does the WRB do?
    • In a plastered wall (a drainage system) the WRB is the primary means of waterproofing
    • BUILDING PAPERS TYPES OF COMMONLY USED BUILDING PAPERS  GRADE “B”  GRADE “D”  SYNTHETIC OR NON-PAPER
    • Paperback Lath
    • GRADE “B”  WATER PENETRATION RESISTANCE - RATED AT 16 HOURS  U.V. SENSATIVE - TENDS TO SHRINK AND WRINKLE  NOT VAP OR P ERM EABLE AND CANNOT BE USED W I TH W OOD-BASED SHEATHI NG
    • GRADE “B”
    • GRADE “B”
    • GRADE “D”  10 TO 60 MINUTE RATED  FOR USE OVER WOOD-BASED SHEATHING IN TWO LAYERS  ALLOWS VAPOR PERMABILITY  RESISTS U.V. DEGRADATION BETTER THAN GRADE “B”
    • GRADE “D”
    • GRADE “D”
    •  CLASSIFIED GRADE “D”  SUPERIOR PRODUCT IN AREA OF HIGH WINDS - RESISTS TEARING
    • FELT  Do not use #15 or 30# felt for a weather resistant barrier! Felt is a roofing product that is no longer used in wall and ceiling assemblies.
    • FLASHING AND SEALANTS
    • SEALANTS/CAULKING & BACKER
    • # 40 TWO-PIECE EXPANSION JOINT XJ 15 ONE-PIECE CONTROL JOINT
    • #40 TWO PIECE VERTICAL JOINT
    • LATHING ACCESSORIES Control Joint: XJ-15
    • LATHING ACCESSORIES Inside Corner Joint: No. 30
    • LATHING ACCESSORIES No. 5 Drip Mould
    • LATHING ACCESSORIES CASING BEADS - PLASTER GROUNDS Short Flange No. 66 Expanded Flange No. 66
    • LACK OF CASING BEAD: NO DEFINITIVE SEPARATION TO DISSIMILAR MATERIAL
    • LATHING ACCESSORIES CASING BEADS - PLASTER GROUNDS LACK OF CASING BEAD: RESULTANT CRACKING
    • LATHING ACCESSORIES CASING BEADS - PLASTER GROUNDS GOOD USE OF CASING BEAD
    • LATHING ACCESSORIES CASING BEADS - PLASTER GROUNDS
    • LATHING ACCESSORIES CASING BEADS - PLASTER GROUNDS
    • LATHING ACCESSORIES OUTSIDE CORNER REINFORCEMENT Corner Aid Corner Bead
    • CORNER AID OUTSIDE CORNER REINFORCEMENT
    • CORNER BEAD OUTSIDE CORNER REINFORCEMENT
    • LATHING ACCESSORIES Foundation Weep Screed PER ASTM C 1063 - 7.11.5
    • UBC Reference: 2506.5 Application of Metal Plaster Bases A minimum 0.019-inch (.48 mm) (No. 26 galvanized sheet gage) corrosion-resistant weep screed with a minimum vertical attachment flange of 3 1/2 inches (89 mm) shall be provided at or below the foundation plate line on all exterior stud walls. The screed shall be placed a minimum of 4 inches (102 mm) above the earth or 2 inches (51 mm) above paved areas and shall be of a type that will allow trapped water to drain to the exterior of the building. The weather-resistive barrier shall lap the attachment flange, and the exterior lath shall cover and terminate on the attachment flange of the screed.
    • PLASTER BASES – TYPES OF LATH
    • Expanded Metal ASTM C847
    • WOVEN WIRE ASTM C1032
    • WELDED WIRE - NO PAPER ASTM C933
    • WELDED WIRE WITH PAPER – ASTM C933
    • Scratch & Brown  Cement  Lime  Sand  Water
    • NEGATIVE characteristics of Portland Cement Based Plaster •Non-Structural •Brittle •Good Compressive Strength •Poor Tensile Strength •Shrinks During Hydration •Prone to Cracking
    • POSTIIVE characteristics of Portland Cement Based Plaster •Water Permeable (water management system) •Moisture saturates approximately 1/16” – 1/8” per hour during heavy precipitation •Water needs a pathway back out of the plaster systems •Walls breath instead of trapping water
    • PORTLAND CEMENT “SCRATCH”
    • PORTLAND CEMENT “SCRATCH” NOTCHED TROWEL
    • PORTLAND CEMENT “SCRATCH” SCARAFIER/COMB
    • Moist cure fresh scratch coat to achieve 48 hours of continuous cement hydration “8.1 Sufficient time between coats shall be allowed to permit each coat to cure or develop enough rigidity to resist cracking or other physical damage when the next coat is applied.” - ASTM C926
    • PORTLAND CEMENT “BROWN”
    • PORTLAND CEMENT “BROWN”
    • Moist cure fresh brown coat to achieve 48 hours of continuous cement hydration …
    • Allow brown to dry cure for an additional 5 days Summary, Average basecoat application: Apply scratch day 1 Moist cure days 2-3 Apply brown day 4 Moist cure days 5-6 Dry cure days 7-11 Total 11 days
    • FINISH OPTIONS  INTEGRALLY COLORED CEMENT & ACRYLIC – Float Finish – Dash Finish – Troweled Finish
    • FINISH OPTIONS  COMMERCIAL TEXTURES RECOM M ENDED CHOI CES
    • Fine Sand Float
    • Med. Sand Float
    • Heavy Sand Float
    • Light Dash
    • Med. Dash
    • Heavy Dash
    • Tunnel Dash
    • K.D. Dash
    • FINISH OPTIONS  COMMERCIAL TEXTURES ACCENT TEXTURES
    • MARBLE- CRETE
    • COMBED SCRAPED
    • FINISH OPTIONS  RESIDENTIAL TEXTURES
    • Light Lace Heavy Lace
    • SPANISH ARIZONA
    • ROCK-N-ROLL FRIEZE
    • FINISH OPTIONS  THEME FINISHES
    • SIMULATED TIMBER
    • SIMULATED BRICK
    • SIMULATED TRAVERTINE
    • FINISH OPTIONS  COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL TEXTURES P OOR CHOI CES
    • CAT FACES
    • CAT FACES IN CRITICAL LIGHT
    • SANTA BARBARA STD. SMOOTH
    • HIGHLY LIKELY TO CRACK EXCESSIVELY
    • •UNLIMITED COLORS 100% ACRYLIC FINISH •MAR & WEATHER RESISTANT ACRYLIC FINISH
    • DESIGNING W/ FOAM “PLANT-ON” SHAPES
    • DESIGNING W/ FOAM “PLANT-ON” SHAPES
    • RECOMMEDED USE OF FOAM … Off the Ground & Away from “Traffic
    • …POOR USE OF FOAM At Ground Level
    • Efflorescence Refers to deposits of soluble compounds (salts) carried by water onto the surface of porous masonry or hydraulic cementitious materials.
    • Efflorescence The process is very similar to your body sweating. During exercise, salts in your body are brought to the surface by the sweat your body produces to cool off. The sweat evaporates taking with it latent heat. The residual material is the white deposit you find on your gym clothes.
    • Efflorescence Efflorescence is not just limited to plaster …
    • Efflorescence .. it can appear on any porous, hydraulic, cementitious material …
    • Efflorescence Plaster is the most difficult surface to remove efflorescence from
    • Efflorescence It doesn’t always have to be white; it is often green, brown, or even black
    • EFFLORESCENCE Efflorescence can also flow unto the surface of non porous materials. It is often caused by precast elements with a horizontal top.
    • Efflorescence at cracks can give an indication of the amount of water flow reaching the drainage plane
    • EFFLORESCENCE Left untreated, it can accumulate into a quite a large amount of material
    • Efflorescence In nature, where time is measured in millions of years, efflorescence takes on a life form of its own …
    • EFFLORESCENCE
    • Efflorescence
    • Efflorescence Three (3) Conditions must exist simultaneously for efflorescence to develop: 1. Soluble salts must be present 2. Water must contact the salts to form a solution 3. The salt solution must have a path to migrate to a surface where the water can evaporate (precipitate out).
    • Efflorescence The most common type of efflorescence is calcium hydroxide, a soluble component of efflorescence. This is the type of efflorescence we refer to as “new bloom” and usually washes away with rain …
    • Efflorescence However, calcium hydroxide efflorescence reacts with air (absorbs carbon dioxide) and becomes calcium carbonate, which is not water soluble and does not was away with the rain.
    • Efflorescence HOW DO I GET THIS STUFF CLEANED UP?
    • www.tsib.org
    • Arizona California Nevada Oregon Washington Plastering Information Bureau San Francisco –San Mateo NortherN CaliforNia lath aNd Plaster Bureau
    • INTRODUCES
    • The following will change the way exterior walls are built
    • Energy Codes
    • JAN 1, 2010 • ONE YEAR DELAY •CA ENERGY ONLINE •ASHRAE 90.1
    • Thermal Shorts
    • Correction Factor, Effective RE ASHRAE Correction Factor 90.1 --- Effective R-value = R-value x Correction Factor The ASHRAE 90.1 correction factor considers the heat loss through the highly inefficient steel studs and is based on the R-value of the insulation used between the studs only.
    • California has 16 zones No relation to ASHRAE Zones Website in the Brochure
    • GOAL: Energy efficiency of 30% in the 2010 compared to the 2004 standard. net-zero energy buildings by 2030.
    • Rigid Foam - Why?
    • REMEMBER THE “R” VALUE LOST DUE TO THERMAL SHORTS? ASHRAE and the energy codes called and they w ant it back ! Cladding Neutral
    • The OBVIOUS CHOICE IS EIFS •CODE RECOGNIZED •PROVEN •READILY AVAILABLE
    • PROBLEM IS…MANY OWNERS WONT USE EIFS – WE NEED CODE COMPLIANT - 3-COAT CEMENT IN OUR MARKETS
    • HERE’S WHAT WE HAVE:
    • PWA 104 Cement plaster Over Foam  CODE – ASTM C-926 item 7.1.3 – “Portland Cement Plaster shall be applied on a metal base when the surface of solid backing consists of gypsum board, gypsum plaster, wood or rigid foam board type products”
    • General Design Recommendations ( All Stucco)  L/360 or stiffer  Vapor Permeable WRB  Plaster Mixes , ASTM C-926  16 inch OC framing - best perform ance
    • Mesh & Base “Lamina” OPTIONS 1. No Lamina - likely to crack more 2. Skim Coat only – Cracking similar to conventional 3. Skim and Mesh – highly crack resistant
    • PWA 105 This is not EIFS … EIFS is defined as the (Finish cladding “and” the Weather Barrier)
    • PWA 105 Inexpensive cement basecoat - no control joints required – drift joints will be required Brown coat need not be hard floated encapsulate the foam for fire rating
    • Installs like traditional cement plaster
    • THE FOAM IN THESE ASSEMBLIES DOES NOT CANCEL THE FIRE RATING - PROVIDED …
    • Fire ratings  Flame Spread less than 25  Smoke Develop not more than 450  Thickness, less than 4 inches  Thermal barrier 1/2 inch of Gypsum
    • USING THE BROCHURE
    • How Much CI?  Step one: Climate Zone and Building Type – Have a PWA in Mind *Assume a Commercial Building in Climate zone 8
    • Step Two Our Target U factor is .062 or less ( assume R-19 Cavity)
    • Assume using PWA 104- we need R 7.0 assume (XPS) we need - Minimum 1.5 density @ 1.5”= R 7.5
    •  With cavity Insulation @ R - 19  & CI @ R 7.5  We Exceed the assembly U-Factor .062
    • Can’t afford a LAMINA ? Another look - Our target is a U factor of .062 or better Space framing @ 24 oc, add two inches foam (XPS) for a U-Factor of ?
    • 24 inch framing – saves money to offset the cost of adding a lamina A factor of .048 , possible credits elsewhere? Highly Crack Resistant
    • TECHNICAL SERVICES INFORMATION BUREAU WWW.TSIB.ORG Updates Details
    •  The WCWCI will hold seminars for Architects, Designers, Inspectors, Building Departments and Contractors The use of the systems are recommended to be installed by contractors who have completed the Western Conference of Wall and Ceiling Institutes educational seminar on “ Insulated Cement Plaster Systems”
    • THE END