Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Stamford School Plan
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Stamford School Plan

306
views

Published on

Published in: Sports, Business

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
306
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. A Better School Plan for Stamford August 2008
  • 2. A Better School Plan In 1896, the first traffic accident happened in the United States when a Duryea motor wagon collided with a bicycle in New York City. The man on the bicycle was sent to the hospital. The driver of the car was sent to jail. It must not have been easy to adjust to the changes brought on by the auto. Britain initially struggled. In 1895, the country passed a law that all autos must be accompanied by a person walking in front of the vehicle, blowing a horn and carrying a red flag. The nascent British auto industry suffered for years as a result, falling behind their German (Benz, Daimler) and American (Oldsmobile, Ford) competitors. America did adjust, however. Today we have an elaborate transportation system that handles an incredibly complex set of problems for drivers with very different needs. While NYC commuters might still complain, no one would argue that the traditional model would better handle today’s traffic (nor would anyone want to walk along I-95 with a flag and a horn). But that’s exactly what we’re doing with Stamford’s public schools. Stamford, the city, has changed greatly over the years. Today we reside in one of the most affluent small cities, but also one with a large number of families needing financial assistance, and a growing number who speak a different language at home. Our school system simply hasn’t changed enough to serve both constituencies: Families who need additional English language instruction and those who want their children to learn Mandarin. Why We Need A Change
  • 3. A Better School Plan The evidence of our problems is overwhelming. Thirteen of our seventeen elementary and middle schools are classified as “failing.” This designation comes despite spending 21% more money per student than the state average. Stamford spends more per student than Darien, our neighbor. Yet we get much poorer results. Middle-class families have fled the public schools in large numbers. Our student population is falling, and we’re being forced to close schools. The achievement gap between the economically disadvantaged children and their middle-class peers remains stubbornly high. Yet, despite evidence that the economically-disadvantaged students perform much better at the magnet schools, we’re closing one magnet (Rogers) and considering redistricting plans that would take seats away from the others. I would argue that it’s time to rethink our entire approach to how we educate our children. In the following pages, I advocate that Stamford adopt a system where all schools are K-8, and all are magnets. I believe that such a move would lift the achievement level of our students, particularly those coming from economically disadvantaged homes. Furthermore, the higher test scores and the popular parental choice feature would attract middle-class families back into the system. Thus bringing an end to the vicious cycle of sagging achievement levels, middle-class flight and declining enrollment. Why We Need A Change
  • 4. A Better School Plan I am not an expert on this matter. I have tried to take into account all of the variables I could think of, and to base my proposal on the available facts. My goal here is not to push an agenda, but to open a dialogue with other parents concerned about the direction of our schools. I would welcome any thoughts or comments, and would be thrilled to see alternative proposals. Some day soon, I would like to see many of our collective ideas become reality. Why We Need A Change
  • 5. A Better School Plan I A Better School Plan II How it Would Work III How to Transition IV How to Achieve Balance V Students with Special Needs VI A Word About… VII Appendix Table of Contents
  • 6. A Better School Plan
  • 7. A Better School Plan
    • 16 or 17 K-8 Magnet Schools.
      • (I don’t know if a middle school is slated for closing)
    Main Features
    • Schools Grouped into 4 Zones.
      • Zones determined by geography.
    • Each Zone has 4-5 Schools, each with a different Curriculum.
    • Families Choose Among Schools Within their Zone Via a Lottery.
  • 8. A Better School Plan Raise the level of achievement for all students. Goals Close the achievement gap for economically disadvantaged students. Foster closer neighborhoods by bringing families back to the public school system.
  • 9. A Better School Plan
    • Students at magnet schools score higher in the CMT across all categories and grades.
    • Economically disadvantaged students perform much better at the magnets.
    Advantages
    • More equitable. Families would have an equal chance at their preferred school. Money spent per student would be similar.
    • Parental choice has proven popular in Stamford and nationally. This feature could attract families back to the public schools.
    • School balance could be achieved gradually via a lottery. No more massive redistricting.
  • 10. A Better School Plan
    • Magnets perform better across all categories, school years.
    CMT Scores, General Population (‘07) % 3rd Reading 4th 5th Avg 3rd Writing 4th 5th Avg 3rd Math 4th 5th Avg ES Magnets 74 69 79 74 88 86 91 88 81 83 86 83 ES District Schools 61 58 68 62 76 78 86 80 73 70 78 74 Difference 13 11 11 11 12 8 6 8 8 13 7 10 Scofield 86 78 87 84 94 86 92 91 88 84 84 85 MS District Schools 66 70 68 68 81 76 76 78 75 69 71 72 Difference 21 8 19 16 13 10 16 13 13 15 13 14
  • 11. A Better School Plan
    • Magnets make a bigger difference for economically disadvantaged students.
    CMT Scores, Economically Disadvantaged Students (‘07) % 3rd Reading 4th 5th Avg 3rd Writing 4th 5th Avg 3rd Math 4th 5th Avg ES Magnets 59 51 58 56 80 80 79 80 78 77 77 77 ES District Schools 42 35 49 42 65 66 76 69 60 53 64 59 Difference 17 16 8 14 15 14 3 11 18 25 13 18 Scofield 74 58 68 67 88 75 82 82 79 71 68 73 MS District Schools 48 49 49 49 72 60 59 64 61 50 54 55 Difference 26 9 19 18 17 15 23 18 19 22 14 18
  • 12. A Better School Plan
    • A large transition.
    • Expenses such as teacher training and facility renovations.
    • Busing would be more complicated, and potentially more expensive.
    Disadvantages
  • 13. How it Would Work
  • 14. How it Would Work
    • Zones would be organized geographically.
    • Each school in a zone would be K-8, and teach a different curriculum.
    • Families would choose among the schools in their zone via a lottery.
    North Zone ( 4 Schools ) Possible schools: Northeast, Scofield, Davenport, Roxbury Central Zone ( 4 Schools ) Possible schools: Springdale, Rippowam, Newfield, Turn of River, Dolan Southwest Zone ( 4 Schools ) Possible schools: Stillmeadow, Hart, Cloonan, Westover Southeast Zone ( 4-5 Schools ) Possible schools: KT Murphy, EMS, Stark, Toquam, Dolan
  • 15. How it Would Work
    • Each of the curriculum has proven successful in Stamford.
    • The BOE would ultimately be responsible for choosing the best options.
    • The programs are popular. Approx. 4 families typically apply for every magnet seat.
    Four Suggested Curricula
  • 16. How it Would Work
    • Through the lottery, families would choose among schools within their zone.
    • Some capacity to select a school in a neighboring zone.
    • The lottery would balance schools for enrollment/demographics.
    The Lottery Lottery Criteria
    • Family preference.
    • Proximity (especially the ability to walk).
    • Demographics.
  • 17. How it Would Work –An Example
    • Families would initially be districted to a school within their zone.
    • Families would swap, via the lottery, spots in their respective schools according to their preference (subject to availability).
    Scenario: A family districted for Roxbury would rather attend another school. Options in the North zone (proposed): Northeast – “Westover” program Scofield – Math & Science Roxbury – Bank Street Davenport – IB
  • 18. How it Would Work – An Example
    • Rules: Families should only apply to schools that they would attend.
    • Rules: 2/3 choices should be within the districted zone.
    • Goal would be to get everyone into one of their top two choices.
    Sample Lottery Card Districted School: Roxbury Districted Zone: North Secondary Zone: Central Choice 1: Davenport Choice 2: Scofield Choice 3: Northeast Any other siblings in the Stamford public schools? If so, where ________? Do you qualify for a lunch program/ELL/assisted housing? Y __ N__ Does your child have any special needs? Yes ____ No_____
  • 19. How it Would Work – An Example
    • 30 economically disadvantaged families would switch between schools.
    • 20 middle-class families would switch.
    Example (simplified) Economically Disadvantaged Seats Available 40 Disadvantaged Seats 30 Roxbury Davenport Middle-Class Seats Available 20 Middle-Class Seats 30
  • 20. How to Transition
  • 21. How to Transition
    • Little disruption. Current middle school children not impacted.
    • Elementary students were going to switch anyways.
    • Disadvantage: Busing would be complicated. Especially during the transition.
    The Plan
    • Transition over three years.
    • Open only a few grades to the lottery per year.
    • Wait for the current middle school children to graduate before switching entirely.
    • Keep school sizes the same.
    The Advantages/Disadvantages
  • 22. How to Transition
    • Year 1: Lottery for 6 th , 5 th and K.
    • Year 2: Lottery for 5 th , 4 th and K.
    • Year 3: Lottery for 4 th , 3 rd and K.
    • Ensuing years, only K.
    3 Year Transition – Elementary School
    • The least disruptive.
    • Elementary students were going to switch for middle school anyways.
    • Busing during the transition could be complicated.
    Enrollment Generic Elementary School Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 8 th -- -- -- 67 7th -- -- 67 67 6th -- 67 67 66 5th 100 67 66 67 4th 100 100 67 66 3 rd 100 100 100 67 2 nd 100 100 100 66 1st 100 100 66 67 K 100 66 67 67 Total 600 600 600 600
  • 23. How to Transition
    • Existing middle school students are not impacted.
    • School sizes remain the same.
    • Busing, again, would be complicated.
    3 Year Transition – Middle School
    • Year 1: Lottery for 6 th , 5 th and K.
    • Year 2: Lottery for 5 th , 4 th and K.
    • Year 3: Lottery for 4 th , 3 rd and K.
    • Ensuing years, only K.
    Enrollment Generic Middle School Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 8 th 200 200 200 67 7th 200 200 67 67 6th 200 67 67 66 5th -- 67 66 67 4th -- -- 67 67 3 rd -- -- -- 66 2 nd -- -- -- 66 1st -- -- 66 67 K -- 66 67 67 Total 600 600 600 600
  • 24. How to Transition
    • Not politically feasible. Too many families would be disrupted.
    • Middle school students would be forced to switch schools, but with little benefit.
    • A gradual transition means more time for teacher training, facility upgrades.
    Why Not All at Once?
  • 25. How to Achieve Balance
  • 26. How to Achieve Balance
    • Achieves balance with reasonable bus rides.
    • Keeps middle class families in the public schools.
    • Gives more families a second chance at the curriculum of their choice.
    • Disadvantages: Busing would be complicated.
    Use the Central Zone as a Conduit between the North and South zones.
    • Bus economically disadvantaged children to the Central zone from the South.
    • Return middle-class children to the South from the Central zone.
    • Bus economically disadvantaged students to the North from the Central zone.
    • Return middle-class children to the Central zone from the North.
    Advantages/Disadvantages
  • 27. How to Achieve Balance
    • Balance entails moving disadvantaged SE students northward. And vice-versa.
    • Southwest and Central need limited balancing, if at all.
    • (for ‘estimates w/out busing’, see Appendix)
    The district average is 46.5%. Acceptable range is 36.5% – 56.5%. North Zone Economically Disadvantaged %: 41.7 Estimated w/out busing: 36 % Central Zone Economically Disadvantaged %: 43.6 Estimated w/out busing: 38 % Southwest Zone Economically Disadvantaged %: 43.6 Estimated w/out busing: 49% Southeast Zone Economically Disadvantaged %: 56.1 Estimated w/out busing: 61%
  • 28. How to Achieve Balance
    • Achieve balance by busing less than 9% of the students between zones (see appendix).
    • Families in the N, C & SE zones would have a 2 nd chance at a curriculum.
    • Shorter bus rides. Fewer families leaving the public schools.
    • If we attract non-district, middle-class students to the EMS (SE Zone), our busing needs fall.
    Bus 274 disadvantaged students from the Southeast to Central. Return 274 non-disadvantaged students from Central to the Southeast. Bus 163 disadvantaged students from Central to the North. Return 163 non-disadvantaged students to Central. (see appendix) North Zone Estimated economically disadvantaged %: 36 New target %: 42 Central Zone Estimated economically disadvantaged %: 38 New target %: 42 Southwest Zone Estimated economically disadvantaged %: 49 New target %: 49 Southeast Zone Estimated economically disadvantaged %: 61 New target %: 51
  • 29. How to Achieve Balance
    • The bus rides would be long.
    • Middle class, Northern families would likely not tolerate the long bus rides into an unfamiliar school zone.
    Why Not Bus Directly Between the North and South?
  • 30. Students with Special Needs
  • 31. Students With Special Needs
    • Each zone would have one school that would specialize in treating students with special needs.
    • Each of these schools would offer a different curriculum.
    • Families would help choose which school is right for their child.
    The Plan
  • 32. A Word About….
  • 33. A Word about…
    • We already bus a significant portion of our students across zones to achieve balance (have you seen our district map?), attend middle school, or go to the magnets.
    • Better balance within the zones lessens the need to bus between them. Springdale has 52% of its population economically disadvantaged, while Newfield only has 31%. The schools are just 1.1 miles apart.
    A Word about Busing
    • My numbers show that balance between the zones can be achieved with limited busing.
    • Longer bus rides, if need be, would be worth it. Especially if it was only temporary because of a transition period.
    • The need for busing declines as we bring in out-of-district students.
  • 34. A Word about…
    • We could lessen the impact by gradually training teachers, spreading out the facility alterations.
    • Couldn’t outside money help? For example, could GE’s math & sciences grant help pay to train our ‘Math & Sciences’ teachers?
    A Word about Expenses
    • Thinking outside the box, converting our system to magnet schools opens up the possibility of more out-of-district students.
      • More out-of-district students means more state money.
      • More out-of-district students would offset our declining enrollment.
      • If we opened up our Southeast zone to outside students, it would reduce the need for busing.
      • If we opened up our Southeast zone, we could ask the state to help pay to refurbish the facility at Rogers.
  • 35. Appendix
  • 36. Appendix 07 CMT Results Entire Student Body, ‘07 CMT Reading Writing Math 3rd 4th 5th Avg 3rd 4th 5th Avg 3rd 4th 5th Avg Hart 66 41 62 56 78 61 83 74 80 63 80 74 Toquam 75 86 84 82 85 92 89 89 70 81 76 76 Westover 90 81 88 86 100 98 97 98 93 96 95 95 Rogers 65 67 82 71 87 91 96 91 82 91 91 88 Magnet Avg. 74 69 79 74 88 86 91 88 81 83 86 83 Newfield 63 72 65 67 90 82 87 86 79 74 65 73 NorthEast 75 66 76 72 88 89 91 89 86 80 81 82 Roxbury 68 61 73 67 81 83 81 82 69 68 74 70 Springdale 58 55 68 60 77 78 81 79 72 67 82 74 Stillmeadow 58 60 74 64 80 81 92 84 69 71 86 75 Davenport 74 54 70 66 87 72 87 82 86 76 79 80 Stark 45 58 62 55 53 74 87 71 49 65 83 66 KT Murphy 49 38 57 48 51 62 79 64 77 55 75 69 District Avg. 61 58 68 62 76 78 86 80 73 70 78 74 Difference 13 11 11 11 12 8 6 8 8 13 7 10 Source : CMT, greatschools.net
  • 37. Appendix 07 CMT Results Entire Student Body, ‘07 CMT Reading Writing Math 6th 7th 8th Avg 6th 7th 8th Avg 6th 7th 8th Avg Scofield 86 78 87 84 94 86 92 91 88 84 84 85 Cloonan 65 67 70 67 77 75 79 77 74 68 69 70 Dolan 63 73 73 70 81 74 82 79 78 69 75 74 Rippowam 65 77 66 69 81 77 72 77 71 72 71 71 Turn of River 69 63 63 65 86 77 70 78 76 68 70 71 District Avg. 66 70 68 68 81 76 76 78 75 69 71 72 Difference 21 8 19 16 13 10 16 13 13 15 13 14 Source : CMT, greatschools.net
  • 38. Appendix 07 CMT Results Economically Disadvantaged Students, ‘07 CMT Reading Writing Math 3rd 4th 5th Avg 3rd 4th 5th Avg 3rd 4th 5th Avg Hart 49 33 45 42 64 49 68 60 73 55 74 67 Toquam 62 65 44 57 74 85 62 74 77 75 56 69 Westover 74 42 68 61 100 96 92 96 87 88 87 87 Rogers 50 63 73 62 82 89 95 89 75 91 89 85 Magnet Avg. 59 51 58 56 80 80 79 80 78 77 77 77 Newfield 29 43 22 31 77 68 70 72 58 55 37 50 Northeast 54 37 60 50 77 79 85 80 73 60 63 65 Roxbury 43 21 41 35 67 70 57 65 43 33 49 42 Springdale 30 34 44 36 60 64 67 64 54 58 67 60 Stillmeadow 40 38 66 48 72 71 90 78 58 48 71 59 Davenport 58 30 56 48 76 54 79 70 78 61 67 69 Stark 39 45 57 47 41 64 86 64 46 52 78 59 KT Murphy 43 31 48 41 49 59 73 60 73 53 76 67 District Avg. 42 35 49 42 65 66 76 69 60 53 64 59 Difference 17 16 8 14 15 14 3 11 18 25 13 18 Source : CMT, greatschools.net
  • 39. Appendix 07 CMT Results Economically Disadvantaged Students Reading Writing Math 6th 7th 8th Avg 6th 7th 8th Avg 6th 7th 8th Avg Scofield 74 58 68 67 88 75 82 82 79 71 68 73 Cloonan 54 47 52 51 66 54 65 62 66 45 49 53 Dolan 47 52 59 53 73 61 64 66 65 52 58 58 Rippowam 45 56 44 48 70 63 54 62 55 51 55 54 Turn of River 45 41 41 42 77 63 54 65 56 50 55 54 District Avg. 48 49 49 49 72 60 59 64 61 50 54 55 Difference 26 9 19 18 17 15 23 18 19 22 14 18 Source : CMT, greatschools.net
  • 40. Appendix Busing for Balance My guess. School regions without current busing Original Data from Stamford BOE. My guess is my own. (cont. on next pg.) My Guess (ex- busing) New New New DisAd MC DisAd MC Net Chg Actual Actual Guess Guess Tgt Tgt Students Students Students Students Students +/- North Enrollmt DisAd DisAd DisAd DisAd DisAd Moved +/- +/- +/- +/- +/- Scofield 604 34.3% 207 Northeast 814 40.7% 331 Davenport 514 52.5% 270 Roxbury 651 41.2% 268 2583 41.7% 1077 36.0% 930 42.3% 1093 163 -- -- 163 -163 163 Central Springdale 567 51.8% 294 Newfield 630 31.4% 198 Rippowam 811 47.0% 381 Turn of River 612 44.2% 271 2620 43.6% 1143 38.0% 996 42.3% 1108 113 274 -274 -163 163 111
  • 41. Appendix Busing for Balance My guess for the school regions without current busing, cont… Original Data: Stamford BOE. My guess is my own. Guess ex-busng New New New DisAd MC DisAd MC Net Chg Actual Actual Guess Guess Tgt Tgt Students Students Students Students Students +/- Enrollmt DisAd DisAd DisAd DisAd DisAd Moved +/- +/- +/- +/- +/- Southeast Toquam 453 38.2% 173 Stark 591 59.9% 354 KT Murphy 545 68.8% 375 Rogers/EMS 527 64.8% 341 Dolan 624 47.2% 295 2740 56.1% 1538 61.0% 1671 51.0% 1397 -274 -274 274 -- -- -274 Southwest Hart 417 61.8% 258 Cloonan 594 43.3% 257 Westover 633 32.0% 203 Stillmeadow 586 43.4% 254 2230 43.6% 972 49.0% 1093 49.0% 1093 0 -- -- -- -- 0 10173 46.5% 4730 Students Moved 874 % 8.6%