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Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final
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Ccsr cps leadership summit 2013 final

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The Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR) conducted a recent analysis on the extent to which students in CPS are using technology for school and whether factors such as school culture and the …

The Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR) conducted a recent analysis on the extent to which students in CPS are using technology for school and whether factors such as school culture and the use of technology by their teachers and principals contribute to this. CCSR has identified a number of key factors that influence students’ in-school technology use. In this CPS and CCSR joint session, we will explore the key findings from this study and provide concrete suggestions on how you, as a leader, can support and increase student’s in-school use of technology within your building.

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  • 1. ccsr.uchicago.edu
  • 2. ©CCSR Findings from the CCSR Technology Report: Leadership’s Role in Increasing Student In-school Technology Use Stacy B. Ehrlich, University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research John Mellios, Director, CPS Educational Tools & Technology CPS Leadership Technology Summit July 16, 2013
  • 3. ©CCSR 3 Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR) Who we are  Mission: To provide high quality research to inform policy and practice in CPS  Independent of the school system, but regularly meet with stakeholders  Work with administrators and educators to search for solutions to problems of urban schools Prior work on technology in CPS  Detailed look at trends of educational technology use  What encourages use in schools
  • 4. ©CCSR 4 CPS Educational Technology and Tools Department  Educational Technology - Vision for learning through technology - Initiatives: ipads, Technology Magnet Cluster - Programs: Safari Montage, Adobe Youth Voices, Virtual Learning  Instructional Materials and Resources - Manage the RFP process for all district materials - Manage the distribution of district materials  Libraries and Information Services - Develop new libraries - Support librarians - Technology integration
  • 5. ©CCSR 5 Current study explores how the use of technology may have changed in CPS in recent years  Technology use is now ubiquitous among youth  But, students do not leave high school feeling prepared - Nationally, 36% believe schools are preparing them to use technology for post-secondary education or workforce - Students in lower-resourced schools have least technology support, despite likely needing it the most (Goode, 2010)
  • 6. ©CCSR 6 This study: What does technology use look like in CPS now?  What do use, support, and expectations for technology use look like in CPS? - How much are students and teachers using technology? - How much do teachers and principals expect technology to be used for teaching and learning?  Do these differ across schools?  How much are student, teacher, and principal experiences related to each other?
  • 7. ©CCSR 7 Data: CCSR/CPS My Voice, My School survey  Data collection - Online survey administration across CPS - Spring 2011 and 2012  2011 Sample (responding to technology questions) - Students, grades 6-12 (74%; n = 123,657) - Teachers, all grades (49%; n = 10,362) - Principals (61%; n = 366)  Focus here will be on high schools, but most findings were similar in elementary schools
  • 8. ©CCSR 8 Preview of main findings  Levels of technology use in CPS are lower than might be expected, given wide access  Across all school types, teachers’ expectations of use are lower than students’ actual use  Student use of technology is related to: - Teachers’ levels of technology use - Levels of expectations for use (by teachers and principals) - Barriers to use within the school
  • 9. ©CCSR 9 Where CPS students stand: Access and preferences  Over 90% 6th-12th graders have access to the internet at home  Students prefer to use technology to find information 10% 29% 61% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% I prefer finding information online Agree/ Strongly agree Neutral Disagree/ Strongly disagree
  • 10. ©CCSR 10 While roughly half of CPS students use technology weekly for school, 20-30% rarely or never do 19% 27% 50% 20% 24% 18% 61% 49% 32% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Internet Computer programs To create something new At least weekly Montly Less than monthly Note: HLM analyses reveal that overall student technology use does not differ significantly between white and African American students, or by neighborhood social status.
  • 11. ©CCSR 11 Most teachers use internet weekly for preparation, but fewer incorporate computers into their delivery of lessons or expect students to use technology 15% 24% 27% 15% 21% 25% 69% 51% 44% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Use internet for lesson prep Use software for instruction Expect students to use technology At least weekly Monthly Less than monthly No access
  • 12. ©CCSR 12 Across all school types, teachers’ expectations for student use are lower than students’ own description of use 6% 21% 18% 12% 21% 20% 81% 57% 62% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Selective Enrollment Neighborhood Charter School Type Students’ use of internet Teachers’ expectations of student use 15% 28% 36% 19% 25% 28% 64% 43% 32% Selective Enrollment Neighborhood Charter School Type At least weekly Monthly Less than monthly No access
  • 13. ©CCSR 13 Though most principals expect integration of technology, far fewer believe teachers are using technology to have students interact 6% 40%31% 37% 63% 23% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Expect teachers to integrate technology Teachers use tech to have students interact A great deal Somewhat A little / Not at all
  • 14. ©CCSR 14 Most barriers have declined slightly in recent years, but lack of computers and appropriate PD continue to be largest barriers 22% 29% 25% 17% 23% 15% 23% 25% 47% 43% 36% 44% 34% 41% 60% 55% 32% 27% 39% 40% 43% 44% 17% 20% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 2005 2011 2005 2011 2005 2011 2005 2011 Not enough computers Infrastructure Internet issues Lack of apprpriate PD Great barrier Small/moderate barrier Not a barrier
  • 15. ©CCSR 15 Student, teacher, and principal experiences are related to each other  Some differences in student use are explained by teachers’ use, expectations, and school culture  In turn, teachers’ experiences partially explained by principals’ expectations, and schools’ barriers to technology use
  • 16. ©CCSR Conclusions, Recommendations, and Existing CPS Supports
  • 17. ©CCSR 17 This study found that the following factors are related to student technology use  School type and composition  How much their teachers use and expect technology use by their students  Whether school culture supports technology for instruction and learning  Existing barriers to the use of technology  Leadership: higher expectations of technology use
  • 18. ©CCSR 18 Leadership Recommendations Reflect on the vision of learning within your school  Does it include technology?  What kind of integration? - Computer practice programs - Creation of learning artifacts
  • 19. ©CCSR 19 Leadership Recommendations Leverage already existing resources in CPS  Safari Montage – online digital media repository and video conferencing  SOAR Library Systems  District E-Book collection  Online Information Databases  Gooru  Edmodo  RTI programs  Adobe Youth Voices
  • 20. ©CCSR 20 Leadership Recommendations Develop a culture within your faculty around integrating technology into the everyday of learning - Adopt Google collaborative structures (share lessons plans on a shared google drive space) - Ask teachers to collaboratively write something together using google docs - Survey teachers using google forms - Go paperless - Develop an culture of sharing by making everything open source (open and accessible for viewing)
  • 21. ©CCSR 21 Leadership Recommendations Develop teacher capacity to integrate technology into their own practice  Do a tech “book read” by exploring an app or tool together  Support teachers by giving them time to learn new things and space to try things out - Try out an app for one quarter and reflect how it goes - Think through one lesson that focuses on students are using technology - Provide teachers time to reflect on the “piloting” of ideas - Provide reachable tech goals for the school. (i.e. we are all going to use google to communicate with each other).
  • 22. ©CCSR 22 Leadership Recommendations Attend to tech infrastructure  Keep an up to date inventory  Maintain equipment in your building (10-15% of budget set aside for repair and upkeep)  Remove the barriers that get in the way of the use of technology (i.e. fix the access point)  Think about unintended barriers that are inadvertently put into place - Carts locked in one closet reduces the likely use of the cart - Checking out one cart for the whole school – results in students only using it once a month  Develop school level policies for technology equipment and use
  • 23. Many thanks to our funder, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation For more information, please contact Stacy Ehrlich at sehrlich@uchicago.edu Full research report available at ccsr.uchicago.edu Thank you!

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