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Quarter 2 prompts, presentation

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  • 1. Independent Reading Quarter 2 Essay Prompts
  • 2. Essay Prompt #1 In the beginning of a novel, the author maypresent a certain character one way. By the endof the novel, this character may be presentedcompletely different. This is often what happenswith dynamic characterization. In your work, picka character which is transformed in this way.Describe the differences in how the character isdescribed in the beginning from how he/she isdescribed by the end of the novel. Use specificexamples from your text.
  • 3. Essay Prompt #2Morally ambiguous characters -- characters whose behavior discourages readers from identifying them as purely evil or purely good -- are at the heart of many works of literature. Choose a novel or play in which a morally ambiguous character plays a pivotal role. Then write an essay in which you explain how the character can be viewed as morally ambiguous and why his or her moral ambiguity is significant to the work as a whole. Avoid mere plot summary.
  • 4. Three ways to answer prompt 1:• First: 4 paragraph essay – – Use when the character has one very dominant change to a specific aspect (e.g. perspective of racism)• Second: 5 paragraph essay – – Use when the character’s change is the result of a very specific, single incident (e.g. main character goes from optimistic to pessimistic as the result of the death of his loved one)• Second: 5+ paragraph essay – – Use for a character whose change is the result of many minor events in conjunction (e.g. a main character who starts as a child, goes through a long journey with many perspective-changing events, becomes an adult at the end; the ‘coming of age’ story)
  • 5. Prompt #1: Way of Answering v.1• For a 4 paragraph essay: – Pick a dynamic character. – Pick one thing about them that has changed dramatically from beginning to end of the book. (this aspect should be a huge part of the character and should be able to be discussed in-depth) – In body paragraph 1: describe the character in summative detail (who they are, what they do, what their problem is, etc – give enough background about the book’s plot and action); describe how they are in terms of that aspect you’ve chosen. **include 2 quotes – In body paragraph 2: describe and analyze what the character goes through in the novel that changes that aspect about them, and what it means for them and the meaning of the book as a whole. **include 2 quotes – Conclusion: what can we learn about people from this kind of change, universally?
  • 6. Prompt #1: Way of Answering v.2• For a 5 paragraph essay: – Pick a dynamic character. – Find the single event in the book that contributes to the way in which the character changes the most. (this aspect should be a huge part of plot and should be able to be discussed in-depth) – In body paragraph 1: describe the character in summative detail (who they are, what they do, what their problem is, etc – give enough background about the book’s plot and action); describe how they are before the event you’ve chosen. **include 1 quote – In body paragraph 2: describe, in-depth, the single most major event that happens that changes the character **include 1 quote – In body paragraph 3: describe and analyze why and how that event impacts/changes the character, and what it means for the meaning of the book as a whole. **include 2 quotes – Conclusion: what can we learn about people from this kind of change, universally?
  • 7. Prompt #1: Way of Answering v.3• For a 5+ paragraph essay: – Pick a dynamic character. – Find several minor events/instances that contribute to the way in which the character changes – In body paragraph 1: describe the character in summative detail (who they are, what they do, what their problem is, etc – give enough background about the book’s plot and action); describe how they are before any of the events you’ve chosen. **include 1 quote – In body paragraphs 2+: in each paragraph, describe each minor event (summarize the actions), and analyze the way in which that event has changed the individual in a particular way **include 1 quote for each. – In final body paragraph:: describe and analyze who the character is in the end as a result, and what it means for the meaning of the book as a whole. **include 1 quote – Conclusion: what can we learn about people from this kind of change, universally?
  • 8. Sample Prompt 1 Response: Huck Finn• Using the outline on the back of your own outline, let’s do a sample• Pick a version of responses – which works best?• Thesis?• Topic sentences?• Examples?
  • 9. Essay Style: Words/Phrases to Avoid• basically/essentially/totally -These words seldom add anything useful to a sentence. Try the sentence without them and, almost always, you will see the sentence improve• Really, truly – both terms ‘real’ and ‘true’ have very specific meanings that we have lost over time in our over-usage of ‘really’ and ‘truly.’ Avoid unless you mean the actual definitions.• Being that… these words are a non-standard substitute for because• Due to the fact that… Using this phrase is a sure sign that your sentence is in trouble. Did you mean because? Due to is acceptable after a linking verb (The teams failure was due to illness among the stars.); otherwise, avoid it.
  • 10. Essay Style: Words/Phrases to Avoid• Firstly, Secondly, Thirdly, etc. - Number things with first, second, third, etc. and not with these adverbial forms.• Got - Many writers regard got as an ugly word, and they have a point. If you can avoid it in writing, do so.• Interesting - One of the least interesting words in English, the word you use to describe an ugly baby. If you show us why something is interesting, youre doing your job.• Kind of/Sort of - these are OK in informal situations, but in formal academic prose, substitute somewhat, rather or slightly. We were kind of rather pleased with the results.
  • 11. Essay Style: Words/Phrases to Avoid• Just - Like ‘true’ and ‘real,’ ‘just’ has a very specific meaning – avoid using in the following way “he just didn’t understand.”• Nice – there are so many more descriptive and accurate words than ‘nice’; think about it this way – when someone goes on a date with you and they tell their friends you were ‘nice,’ is that actually all that good? Be more descriptive than ‘nice.’ Same goes for ‘bad.’• Very – also includes ‘quite,’ again with ‘really’; these are intensifiers. These words seldom add anything useful. Try the sentence without them and see if it improves.• Quantifiers, such as ‘always,’ ‘never,’ ‘everyone,’ ‘all,’ etc. - These words are hard to defend, because your readers tend to be good at finding exceptions.