Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
User stories applied ch4
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

User stories applied ch4

990

Published on

Gathering Stories

Gathering Stories

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
990
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. USER STORIES APPLIED:FOR AGILE SOFTWAREDEVELOPMENTCHAPTER 4 GATHERING STORIESDavid Ko
  • 2. Trawling: the process of gatheringrequirements Different-sized nets can be used to capture different-sized requirements The idea that requirements, like fish, mature and possibly die. You wont catch all of the fish in an area by trawling A skilled requirements trawler will know where to look for requirements
  • 3. The key difference betweenWaterfall and Agile Gathering Requirement process  Waterfall  emphasis on getting all the requirements right and written early in the project  Agile  acknowledge that it is impossible to get all of the user stories in one pass
  • 4. One of the advantages ofworking with stories is that it is very easy to write them at different levels of detail.
  • 5. Even though we acknowledge the impossibility of writing all of the stories for a project.
  • 6. We should still make an initialupfront attempt to write those that we can,even if many are written at a very high level
  • 7. We can then evolve that story intosmaller, more useful stories later.
  • 8. Techniques of gatheringrequirements User interviews Questionnaires Observation Story-writing workshops
  • 9. User interviews One of the keys to success with interviews is the selection of interviewees The best technique for getting to the essence of a users needs is through the questions you ask.
  • 10. Open-Ended and Context-FreeQuestions give no room for anything other than a simple yes or no do not include an implied answer or preference
  • 11. Questionnaires It is useful for a large user population. Questionnaires do not lend themselves to follow up questions
  • 12. Disadv If you give the user a list of choices, then you may miss hearing about the features youve never thought of. Alternatively, if the user is allowed to respond with free-form text it will be difficult to tabulate answers.
  • 13. Observation You can learn a lot from observing someone using my software Unfortunately, opportunities for user observation are rare  unless you are developing for in-house customers.
  • 14. Story-writing workshops We need different kinds of participants to attend this meeting Participants write as many stories as they can No priorities are associated with the stories at this point  the customer will have a chance to do that later
  • 15. A good story-writing workshop Combines the best elements of brainstorming with low-fidelity prototyping  paper, note cards, or a white board The prototype is built up iteratively Not to identify actual screens and fields Rather, the conceptual workflows are identified
  • 16. A low-fidelity prototype forBigMoneyJobs
  • 17. Process Identify one user role or persona first Draw the empty box and tell the participants that it’s the main screen Ask them what they can do here (action) For each action, draw a line to a new box, label that box, and write a story. Repeat the process using each role or persona so the order does not matter
  • 18. Throw It Away Be sure to throw away or erase the low-fidelity prototype within a few days of creating it. A prototype is not a long-term artifact of your development process You dont want to cause any confusion by keeping it around.
  • 19. During a story writing workshop the focusshould be on quantity rather than quality.
  • 20. Even if youll eventually keepyour stories electronically, during the story-writing workshop use cards.
  • 21. You do not want to get boggeddown in lengthy debate over each story. If a story is redundant with or becomes replaced by a betterstory later, then you can just rip up the story.

×