2011 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and AutomationShanghai International Conference CenterMay 9-13, 2011, Shang...
A. Representation in Monocular SLAM with GO                                           For generalized objects, the constan...
SLAM with GO. However, from a practical point of view,stationary objects could further improve the accuracy andconvergence...
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(a) Target 1 (static object marked with green circle). The true velocity of Target                       Fig. 8.    The NT...
(a) Frame 10.               (b) Frame 330. The person appeared (c) Frame 950. The person appeared (d) Frame 1350. The pers...
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Achieving undelayed initialization in monocular slam with generalized objects using velocity estimate based classification

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Achieving undelayed initialization in monocular slam with generalized objects using velocity estimate based classification

  1. 1. 2011 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and AutomationShanghai International Conference CenterMay 9-13, 2011, Shanghai, China Achieving Undelayed Initialization in Monocular SLAM with Generalized Objects Using Velocity Estimate-based Classification Chen-Han Hsiao and Chieh-Chih Wang Abstract— Based on the framework of simultaneous local- objects are available in which manual operations such asization and mapping (SLAM), SLAM with generalized objects deleting features on non-static objects are needed. Migliore et(GO) has an additional structure to allow motion mode learning al. [8] demonstrated a monocular simultaneous localization,of generalized objects, and calculates a joint posterior overthe robot, stationary objects and moving objects. While the mapping and moving object tracking (SLAMMOT) systemfeasibility of monocular SLAM has been demonstrated and where a SLAM filter and a moving object tracking filter areundelayed initialization has been achieved using the inverse used separately. The stationary and moving object classifica-depth parametrization, it is still challenging to achieve unde- tion is based on the uncertain projective geometry [9].layed initialization in monocular SLAM with GO because ofthe delay decision of static and moving object classification. In In our ongoing work following the SLAM with GOthis paper, we propose a simple yet effective static and moving framework [5], an augmented state SLAM with GO approachobject classification method using the velocity estimates directly using the existing inverse depth parametrization was pro-from SLAM with GO. Compared to the existing approach in posed to solve monocular SLAM and bearings-only trackingwhich the observations of a new/unclassified feature can not concurrently. A stereo-based SLAM with GO system hasbe used in state estimation, the proposed approach makes theuses of all observations without any delay to estimate the whole been demonstrated [10] in which the observability issue isstate vector of SLAM with GO. Both Monte Carlo simulations solved straightforwardly. In these monocular- and stereo-and real experimental results demonstrate the accuracy of based approaches, stationary or moving classification of athe proposed classification algorithm and the estimates of new detected feature is accomplished by comparing two localmonocular SLAM with GO. monocular SLAM results: one is local monocular SLAM without adding this new feature and the other is local I. INTRODUCTION monocular SLAM under the assumption that this new feature The feasibility of monocular simultaneous localization and is stationary. The difference of these two hypotheses ismapping (SLAM) has been demonstrated [1], [2] in which temporally integrated using a binary Bayes filter. A thresholdthe 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) camera pose and 3 DOF is determined for stationary or moving object classificationfeature locations are simultaneously estimated using a single after a fixed number of updates. Although the modifiedcamera following the extended Kalman filter (EKF) frame- inverse depth parametrization is used, initialization of thesework. An inverse depth parametrization [3], [4] was proposed monocular and stereo-based systems is still delayed as theto accomplish undelayed initialization in monocular SLAM. observations of new features during the classification stageIt is also shown that the inverse depth parametrization has are not used in the estimation.a better Gaussian property for EKF and has a capability for In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective staticestimating features at a potentially infinite distance. However, and moving object classification method using the velocitySLAM could fail in dynamic environments if moving entities estimates directly from SLAM with GO. A new feature isare not dealt with properly [5]. classified as stationary or moving using two thresholds which A few attempts have been made to solve the monocular or are determined intuitively. The number of the time stepsvisual SLAM problems in dynamic environments. Sola [6] for classification is not fixed in the proposed classificationmentioned the observability issue of bearings-only tracking method which avoids misclassification due to insufficientand pointed out the observability issues of monocular SLAM observation updates and reduces unnecessary computationalin dynamic environments. Accordingly, two cameras instead cost in the cases that new features can be easily classified.of single one were used to solve the monocular SLAM The proposed approach makes the uses of all observationsand moving object tracking problem with some heuristics without any delay to estimate the whole state vector offor detecting moving objects. In [7], moving object effects SLAM with GO. Both Monte Carlo simulations and realare removed given that the geometry of known 3D moving experimental results demonstrate the accuracy of the pro- posed classification algorithm and the estimates of monocular This work was partially supported by grants from Taiwan NSC (#99- SLAM with GO.2221-E-002-192) and Intel-NTU Connected Context Computing Center. C.-H. Hsiao was with the Department of Computer Science and In-formation Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. He iscurrently with MSI. II. T HEORETICAL F OUNDATION C.-C. Wang is with the Department of Computer Science andInformation Engineering and the Graduate Institute of Networkingand Multimedia, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan e-mail: In this section, the theoretical foundation of monocularbobwang@ntu.edu.tw SLAM with GO is described.978-1-61284-385-8/11/$26.00 ©2011 IEEE 4060
  2. 2. A. Representation in Monocular SLAM with GO For generalized objects, the constant velocity model is applied and the location of a generalized object at the next Following the EKF-based SLAM framework, a state vector frame can be calculated in a closed form:χ in SLAM with GO consists of the pose and velocity ofthe camera/robot and locations and velocities of generalizedobjects. oi k+1 = loc(oi ) + vk · ∆t k i (7) 1 i = ri + Gk + vk · ∆t ⊤ ⊤ χ = (x⊤ , o1 , o2 , . . . , on ⊤ )⊤ (1) ρk k k k k 1where xk composes of the camera position rW in the world = ri + Gk+1 ρk+1coordinate system, the quaternion defining the camera orien- where Gk and Gk+1 are the directional vectors.tation qW in the world coordinate system, and the camera In the observation update stage of EKF, generalized ob-velocity vW in the world coordinate system and the camera jects are transformed to the camera coordinate system andangular velocity ω C in the camera coordinate system.  W then projected on the camera image plane. Let Rc be the k r rotation matrix defined by the camera orientation qc . The k qW  points are transformed to the camera coordinate by: xk =  W  v  (2) hoi x ωC hoi = hoi = h(oi , xk ) (8) k y koi denotes the i-th generalized object which can be stationary hoi z kor moving in the framework of SLAM with GO. The existing 1 = Rc ri + k k Gk (θk , φk ) − rW k (9)parametrization for only stationary objects is insufficient ρkto represent generalized objects. In [10], the inverse depth The predicted measurements on the image plane are:parametrization is added with 3-axis speeds in the world ocoordinate system to represent generalized objects. Each f hxi u u0 − dx o ho igeneralized object is coded with the 9-dimension state vector. zoi k = = P roj(hoi ) k = z hyi (10) v v0 − f oi dy hz ⊤ ⊤ ⊤ where P roj is the project function, (u0 , v0 ) is the camera oi k = oi k i vk (3) center in pixels, f is the focal length, dx and dy represent the pixel size. The monocular SLAM with GO state vector ⊤ is updated by the EKF algorithm. ok = xk yk zk θk φk ρk (4) C. Undelayed Initializationwhere ok is the 3D location of a generalized object presented The location initialization of a new generalized object isusing the inverse depth parametrization. xk yk zk is the the same as the approach in [3]. To initialize the velocitycamera location when this object is first observed. of a generalized object, v0 is set to be 0 in this work. The covariance value of the velocity estimate σv is designed to vk = x vk y vk z vk ⊤ (5) cover its 95% acceptance region [−|v|max , |v|max ].where vk denotes the 3-axis velocities of the generalized |v|maxobject in the world coordinate system. σv = (11) 2 The 3D location of a generalized object w.r.t. to the worldcoordinate system can be computed as: |v|max is set to 3 m/sec in this work. A generalized   object is augmented to the state vector of SLAM with GO xk straightforwardly and the new covariance of the SLAM with 1 loc(oi ) =  yk  + k × G(θk , φk ) (6) GO state is updated accordingly. ρk zk By using the modified inverse depth parametrization, awhere the direction vector G(θ, φ) defines the direction of new generalized object is augmented to the state vector at thethe ray and ρ is the inverse depth between the feature and first observed frame. Through this undelayed initialization,camera optical center. the proposed monocular SLAM with GO system uses all measurements to estimate both the camera pose and theB. EKF-based SLAM with GO locations generalized objects. In the prediction stage of the EKF algorithm, the constant D. Classification in SLAM with GOvelocity and constant angular velocity motion model [3] is In SLAM with GO, generalized objects are represented in-applied for predicting the camera pose at the next time step stead of representing stationary and moving objects directly.as the camera is the only sensor used to accomplish SLAM From a theoretical point of view, it could be unnecessary towith GO in this work. have a stationary and moving object classification module in 4061
  3. 3. SLAM with GO. However, from a practical point of view,stationary objects could further improve the accuracy andconvergence of the state estimates under the static objectmodel. After classification, generalized objects can be easilysimplified to stationary objects for reducing the size of thestate vector or can be maintained as moving objects usingthe same parametrization of generalized objects. In addition,stationary objects could contribute to loop detection morethan moving objects in most cases. Stationary and moving (a) Target 1 (a static object marked with green circle). The true velocity of Target 1 is (0, 0, 0)object classification still plays a key role in SLAM with GO.III. S TATIONARY AND M OVING O BJECT C LASSIFICATIONUSING V ELOCITY E STIMATES FROM MONOCULAR SLAM WITH GO Stationary and moving object classification from a movingcamera is a daunting task. In this section, the proposed clas-sification approach using velocity estimates from monocularSLAM with GO is described in detail. (b) Target 2 (a moving object marked with green circle). The true velocity of Target 2 is (1, 0, 0)A. Velocity Convergency For using velocity estimates from SLAM with GO to clas-sify stationary and moving objects, it should be demonstratedthat velocity estimates can be converged and are sufficientto differentiate stationary and moving objects. A simulationusing the proposed monocular SLAM with GO is discussedto show the feasibility of the proposed classification algo-rithm. In this simulated scene, there were 40 static landmarksand 2 moving landmarks. 39 static landmarks were added (c) Target 3 (a moving object marked with green circle). The true velocity ofto the state vector using the inverse depth parametrization Target 3 is (0, 0, 0.5)as known features. One static landmark (Target 1) and two Fig. 1. Velocity convergency of 3 targets under an observable condition.moving landmarks (Target 2 and Target 3) were initialized The estimates using the modified inverse depth parametrization are con-as generalized objects at the first observed frame using the verged to the true values.modified inverse depth parametrization and were added tothe state vector. The camera trajectory was designed as ahelix. Fig. 1 shows the velocity estimates of Targets 1, 2 (0, 0, 0)⊤ . The score reveals the relative likelihood of theand 3 after 150 EKF updates. velocity variable to occur at (0, 0, 0)⊤ . In this simulation, the estimates using the modified inverse If a generalized object oi is static, its velocity vk is k i ⊤depth parametrization are converged to the true values in expected to converge closed to (0, 0, 0) . This score wouldterms of both locations and velocities whether the target thus increases and exceeds a threshold ts .is moving or stationary. The simulation result shows that 2) Score function for detecting moving objects: Givenmoving object classification using velocity estimates from a 3-dimension velocity distribution X = N (µ, Σ) of aSLAM with GO should be feasible. generalized object, the score function is defined as: 2B. Thresholding Classification Cm (X) = DX (0) = (0 − µ)⊤ Σ−1 (0 − µ) (13) As velocity estimates directly show the motion properties where DX is the Mahalanobis distance function under dis-of generalized objects, two simple score functions are defined tribution X. Mahalanobis distance is often used for data ihere for thresholding classification. association and outlier detection. For a moving feature ok , i ⊤ 1) Score function for detecting static objects: Given the its velocity vk is expected to converge away from (0, 0, 0) .3-dimension velocity distribution X = N (µ, Σ) of a gener- The score would thus increases and exceeds threshold tm ifalized object, the score function is defined as: the generalized object is moving. 1Cs (X) = fX (0) = 1 (12) C. Classification States in SLAM with GO (2π)3/2 |Σ|1/2e− 2 (0−µ)⊤ Σ−1 (0−µ) There are three classification states in SLAM with GO:where fX is the probability density function of Gaussian unknown, stationary and moving. Each new feature is initial-distribution X. This score function calculates the proba- ized at the first observed frame using the modified inversebility density function value of the velocity distribution at depth parametrization and the classification state is set to 4062
  4. 4. 25 25 1 1 20 misclassified ratio[moving object] misclassified ratio[moving object] 20 0.9 misclassified ratio[static object] 0.9 misclassified ratio[static object] 15 wrongly classified [static object] wrongly classified [static object] 15 0.8 0.8 Z[m] 10 Z[m] 10 5 0.7 0.7 5 0 0.6 0.6 error ratio error ratio 0 −5 0.5 0.5 5 −5 5 0.4 0.4 0 0 0.3 0.3 −5 −5 25 Y[m] 0.2 0.2 25 20 20 15 15 0.1 0.1 10 10 X[m] 5 X[m] 5 0 0 0 0 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 −5 −5 t t s s (a) Observable scenario (b) Unobservable scenario (a) Misclassified ratio in the observ- (b) Misclassified ratio in the unob- able scenario servable scenarioFig. 2. The simulation scenarios to evaluate the effects of differentthresholds on the classification results. Grey dots denote stationary objects Fig. 3. Effects of the different ts on the classification results. tm is fixedand black dots with lines denote moving objects and their trajectories. at 3.5830.unknown. In each of the following observed frames, the two error are accordingly defined:score functions are computed based on the estimated velocity Wrongly Classified Error: If a feature is classified asdistribution for determining if the feature is stationary or a different type as it should be, this feature is wronglymoving. classified. For instance, a static feature is classified as moving 1) From Unknown to Stationary: If the score value Cs (X) or a moving feature is classified as stationary.of a new feature exceeds the predetermined threshold ts at Misclassified Error: If a feature is wrongly classified ora certain frame, this new feature is immediately classified as not be classified as either static or moving, this feature isstationary. The velocity distribution of this feature is adjusted misclassified.to satisfy the property of a static object in which the velocity a) Effects of ts : Fig. 3(a) and Fig. 3(b) show the effectsis set to (0, 0, 0)⊤ and the corresponding covariance is also of ts under an observable and an unobservable condition,set to 0. There will be no motion prediction at the prediction respectively. In both scenarios, the misclassified ratio ofstage to ensure the velocity of this object fixed at (0, 0, 0)⊤ . stationary features increases when the threshold ts increases, 2) From Unknown to Moving: If the score value Cm (X) while the misclassified ratio of moving features decreases.of a new feature exceeds the predetermined threshold tmat a certain frame, this feature is immediately classified as The misclassified ratio of moving features is decreasingmoving. As the feature has been initialized with the modified when ts is increasing under the observable situation. Mean-inverse depth parametrization and both the position and the while, the misclassified ratio of moving features is decreasingvelocity are already being estimated, there is no need to when ts is increasing under the unobservable situation.adjust the state distribution and the motion model. These results satisfy the expectation that a larger threshold ts would result in less features classified as static. Thus,D. Simulation Results when a larger threshold ts is chosen, the misclassified ratio The proposed classification approach is first evaluated of static features would increase and misclassified ratio ofusing Monte Carlo simulations with the perfect ground truth moving features would decrease. The trade-off between thesein this section. The effects of different thresholds and moving two misclassified ratios could be considered according to theobject speeds on classification are shown and discussed. usage of the monocular SLAM with GO system. 1) Effect of Different Thresholds under Observable and Furthermore, the classification performance is better underUnobservable Conditions: While the observability issues observable situations than under unobservable conditions byof SLAM and bearings-only tracking are well understood, comparing Fig. 3(a) and Fig.3(b). The observable situationsSLAM with GO also inherits the observability issues of could be critical to achieve better classification performanceSLAM and bearings-only tracking. In other words, velocity based on the proposed approach.estimates of generalized or moving objects may not be b) Effects of tm : Fig. 4(a) and Fig. 4(b) show the effectsconverged in unobservable conditions. Two scenarios, one of tm . In both scenarios, the misclassified ratio of staticis under an observable condition and the other is under an features decreases when the threshold tm increases, while theunobservable condition, were designed as depicted in Fig. misclassified ratio of moving features increases. This finding2(a) and Fig. 2(b). In Fig. 2(a), the camera moved at a non- satisfies our expectation that a larger threshold tm wouldconstant speed on a circle to avoid unobservable situations. result in less features classified as moving. Accordingly,In Fig. 2(b), the camera moved at a constant speed on four when a larger threshold tm is chosen, the misclassified ratioconnected lines to test the classification performance under of static features would decrease and misclassified ratio ofan observable situation. 300 static landmarks and 288 moving moving features would increase. However, it should be notedlandmarks with different speed were randomly located in a that only a small portion of misclassified features are caused3D cube with a width of 30 meters in each scenario. Each by wrongly classification. This means that the proposedscenario has 50 Monte Carlo simulations. classification algorithm does not provide incorrect results. As there are three possible states (unknown, static and The situations should be more about insufficient data formoving), the wrongly classified error and the misclassified classification. 4063
  5. 5. 1 1 estimation error of the camera misclassified ratio[moving object] misclassified ratio[moving object] 2 0.9 misclassified ratio[static object] 0.9 misclassified ratio[static object] wrongly classified [static object] wrongly classified [static object] 0.8 0.8 1.8 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 1.6 error ratio error ratio 0.5 0.5 camera estimation error [m] 0.4 0.4 1.4 0.3 0.3 1.2 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.1 1 0 0 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 t t m m 0.8 (a) Misclassified ratio in the observ- (b) Misclassified ratio in the unob- 0.6 able scenario servable scenario 0.4Fig. 4. Effect of different tm on the classification results. ts is fixed at1.6. 0.2 0 1 30 60 120 180 240 300 360 420 480 540 600 0.9 misclassified ratio wrongly classified ratio frame 0.8 25 (a) The estimate errors of the camera pose. Exploring: Frame 0.7 1 to Frame 450), Revisiting: Frame 450 to Frame 600. classification steps 0.6 20 error ratio estimation error of the static objects estimation error of the moving objects 0.5 12 12 0.4 15 0.3 moving object estimation error [m] 10 10 static object estimation error [m] 0.2 10 8 8 0.1 0 5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 6 6 moving speed moving speed 4 4 (a) Classification performance on (b) Number of frame needed for moving objects with different speeds classification 2 2 0 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 Fig. 5. Effects of speed variation of moving objects on classification. frame frame (b) The estimate errors of the static (c) The estimate errors of the mov- objects ing objects 2) Effects of Speed Variation of Moving Objects: In this Fig. 6. Convergency of the proposed SLAM with GO algorithm shownsimulation, the effects of speed variation of moving objects with boxplot. The lower quartile, median, and upper quartile values of eachare evaluated. Fig. 5(a) shows that the classification error box shows the distribution of the estimate errors of all the objects in each observed frame.decreases when the speeds of moving objects increase underthe setting of ts = 1.6 and tm = 3.5830. Regardingstationary objects, the error ratio is near 0 which means that A. Unobservable Situationsalmost all stationary objects are correctly detected. Fig. 5(b) shows the number of frames needed for classi- As shown in the previous section, the proposed clas-fication. Recall that the number of frames for classification sification approach could be less reliable in unobservableis data-driven and not fixed in the proposed approach. The situations than in observable situations. A simulation wasresult shows that the number of frames needed decreases designed to analyze the effects of unobservable situations.when the speeds of moving objects increase. The scenario here is the same as the scenario in Fig. 1 except These two findings satisfy the expectation that moving that the camera moves at a constant velocity. Fig. 7 showsobjects at higher speed can be detected within fewer frames the velocity distribution of these 3 targets using the modifiedand the classification results are more accurate. inverse depth parametrization after 150 EKF steps. 3) Convergency of our SLAM algorithm: The conver- The results show that the estimate uncertainties of thesegency of the proposed monocular SLAM with GO algorithm targets could be too large to reliably determine if these targetsin the observable scenario is checked. The estimate errors of are static or moving. In addition, the observations of Targetthe camera, static features and moving features of 50 Monte 1 are the same as Target 3 under this camera trajectoryCarlo simulation results are shown in Fig. 6. The errors of the even though Target 1 is static and Target 3 is moving. Itcamera pose estimates increase when the robot is exploring is impossible to correctly classify Target 1 and Target 3the environment from Frame 1 to Frame 450. The camera using the observations from a camera moving at a constantstarts to close loop from Frame 450 and the errors decrease velocity. This means that we can find a correspondingwhich is depicted in Fig. 6(a). Fig. 6(b) and Fig. 6(c) show moving object whose observations are the same as a specificthat the estimate errors of static features and moving features stationary object in unobservable situations. Note that suchdecrease when the number of the frames increases. corresponding moving objects must moves parallelly to the camera and at some specific speeds. IV. C LASSIFICATION FAILURE IN U NOBSERVABLE However, the velocity distribution of Target 2 reveals S ITUATIONS another fact. The 95% confidence region of the velocity In this section, we discuss the failures of the proposed estimate of Target 2 does not cover the origin point (0, 0, 0)⊤ .stationary and moving object classification in unobservable This means that Target 2 can be correctly classified assituations. moving using the proposed approach even in unobservable 4064
  6. 6. (a) Target 1 (static object marked with green circle). The true velocity of Target Fig. 8. The NTU-PAL7 robot.1 is (0, 0, 0) all classified correctly as static, and 12 moving features are also classified correctly as moving. classification state static moving unknown Static 107 0 0 Moving 0 12 0(b) Target 2 (moving object marked with green circle). The true velocity of TABLE ITarget 2 is (1, 0, 0) T OTAL CLASSIFICATION RESULT OF REAL EXPERIMENT Fig. 9 shows some of the input images and corresponding SLAM with GO results. At the beginning of the experiment, the checkerboard with known sizes was used for estimating the scale. It is demonstrated that the camera poses are prop- erly estimated, the 3D feature-based map is constructed using the proposed monocular SLAM with GO algorithm, and(c) Target 3 (moving object marked with green circle). The true velocity of moving features are correctly detected using the proposedTarget 3 is (0, 0, 0.5) velocity estimate-based classification approach. Fig. 7. Velocity convergency of 3 targets in an unobservable condition. VI. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK We proposed a simple yet effective static and movingsituations. We argue that no static object would have the same object classification method using the velocity estimatesprojection as the non-parallelly moving objects. Therefore, directly from monocular SLAM with GO. The promisingit is feasible to determine thresholds to correctly classify results of Monte Carlo simulations and real experimentsnon-parallelly moving objects as moving under unobservable have demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed approach.situations. The modified inverse depth parametrization and the proposed classification method achieves undelayed initialization in monocular SLAM with GO. We also showed the interesting V. E XPERIMENTAL R ESULTS issues of classification in unobservable situations. Fig. 8 shows the robotic platform, NTU-PAL7, in which The constant acceleration model and other more advanceda Point Grey Dragonfly2 wide-angle camera was used to motion models should be applied for tracking moving objectscollect image data with 13 frames per second, and a SICK with high-degree motion patterns. Evaluating the trackingLMS-100 laser scanner was used for ground truthing. The performance of moving objects with more complicated mo-field of view of the camera is 79.48 degree. The resolution of tion pattern using SLAM with GO is of our interest. Inthe images is 640 × 480. The experiment was conducted in addition, solutions to move-stop-move maneuvers should bethe basement of our department. 1793 images were collected developed.for evaluating the overall performance of monocular SLAMwith GO such as loop closing, classification and tracking. In R EFERENCESthis data set, there is a person moving around and appearing [1] A. J. Davison, I. D. Reid, N. D. Molton, and O. Stasse, “Monoslam:3 times in front of the camera. Real-time single camera slam,” IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, vol. 29, no. 6, pp. 1052–1067, June 2007. There are 107 static features and 12 moving features. [2] T. Lemaire, C. Berger, I.-K. Jung, and S. Lacroix, “Vision-based slam:When the person appeared, 4 features on the person were Stereo and monocular approaches,” International Journal of Computergenerated and initialized. Table I shows the performance of Vision, vol. 74, no. 3, pp. 343–364, September 2007. [3] J. M. M. Montiel, J. Civera, and A. J. Davison, “Unified inversethe proposed classification algorithm. None of the feature is depth parametrization for monocular slam,” in Robotics: Science andwrongly classified. 107 static features in the environment are Systems, Philadelphia, USA, August 2006. 4065
  7. 7. (a) Frame 10. (b) Frame 330. The person appeared (c) Frame 950. The person appeared (d) Frame 1350. The person appeared at the first time. 4 feature are located at the second time. at the third time. and initialized in the state vector. (e) Top view: Frame 10. (f) Top view: Frame 330. (g) Top view: Frame 950. (h) Top view: Frame 1350.Fig. 9. (a)-(d) show the examples of input images and the results of feature extraction and data assoication. (e)-(f) are the top views of the correspondingSLAM with GO results. In (a)-(d), blue squares are static features, red dots are moving features, green dots are new initialized features with unknownstates, and cyan dots are non-associated features. Ellipses show the projected 2σ bounds of the features. In (e)-(f), black and grey triangles and linesindicate the camera poses and trajectories from monocular SLAM with GO and LIDAR-based SLAM with DATMO. Gray points show the occupancy gridmap from the SLAM part of LIDAR-based SLAM with DATMO. All the estimation of visual features are inside the reasonable cube. Squares indicate thestationary features and blue shadows indicates the 95% acceptance regions of the estimates. [4] J. Civera, A. J. Davison, and J. M. M. Montiel, “Inverse depth ference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Kobe, Japan, May 2009, parametrization for monocular SLAM,” IEEE Transactions on pp. 375–380. Robotics, vol. 24, no. 5, pp. 932–945, October 2008. [8] D. Migliore, R. Rigamonti, D. Marzorati, M. Matteucci, and D. G. [5] C.-C. Wang, C. Thorpe, S. Thrun, M. Hebert, and H. Durrant-Whyte, Sorrenti, “Use a single camera for simultaneous localization and map- “Simultaneous localization, mapping and moving object tracking,” The ping with mobile object tracking in dynamic environments,” in ICRA International Journal of Robotics Research, vol. 26, no. 9, pp. 889– Workshop on Safe navigation in open and dynamic environments: 916, September 2007. Application to autonomous vehicles, 2009. [6] J. Sola, “Towards visual localization, mapping and moving [9] R. Hartley and A. Zisserman, Multiple View Geometry in Computer objects tracking by a mobile robot: a geometric and Vision. Cambridge University Press, March 2004. probabilistic approach.” Ph.D. dissertation, Institut National [10] K.-H. Lin and C.-C. Wang, “Stereo-based simultaneous localization, Polytechnique de Toulouse, February 2007. [Online]. Available: mapping and moving object tracking,” in IEEE/RSJ International http://homepages.laas.fr/jsola/JoanSola/eng/JoanSola.html Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), Taipei, Taiwan, October 2010. [7] S. Wangsiripitak and D. W. Murray, “Avoiding moving outliers in visual slam by tracking moving objects,” in IEEE International Con- 4066

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