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The Learning Process
The Learning Process
The Learning Process
The Learning Process
The Learning Process
The Learning Process
The Learning Process
The Learning Process
The Learning Process
The Learning Process
The Learning Process
The Learning Process
The Learning Process
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The Learning Process

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It is important to realize there is not simply one way to learn. We can all benefit from understanding the learning process fully. Once you do, you'll be better equipped to study and learn using …

It is important to realize there is not simply one way to learn. We can all benefit from understanding the learning process fully. Once you do, you'll be better equipped to study and learn using methods that employ four primary areas:
Reflective Learning (Listen, Read, Observe, Take Notes, Collect Data and Review It All and Ask Yourself Questions)
Abstract Learning (Analyze and Understand the Information and Identify Trends or Theories That Exist Within the Information)
Active Learning (Discuss Ideas with Others, Apply Ideas, Hands-on Activities)
Concrete Learning (Step-by-Step Implementation and Evaluate the Results)

View the presentation for further explanations!

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  • Hello, there. Welcome to this webinar on the learning cycle from the Student Success and Tutoring Center. This webinar will cover the basics of learning, the learning cycle itself, the phases within the cycle, and the different modes within each phase. Let’s get started.
  • First off, what is learning? Well, learning is using what we know to modify how we live. We learn when we investigate, analyze, apply, and experiment. When we investigate, we collect data, review evidence, and use reflective learning. Investigation leads to analysis where we analyze data, develop a theory, and use abstract learning. Analysis then leads to application where we find a practical use, devise a process, and use active learning. Application then follows to experimentation where we execute a process, monitor the results, and use concrete learning. Once we finish with experimentation, we continue back to investigation.
  • These four modes of learning comprise the learning cycle. Together, they provide true learning. From birth, we utilize this cycle, making us all innate learners. The cycle works for all topics whether you’re trying to learn how to ride a bike, trying to get a date, or trying to ace a test. The cycle moves clockwise, but any phase is a suitable start, so once get familiar with one, start wherever you like and go from there. One thing to keep in mind, though, each mode offers distinct uses with its own learning mode. Let’s start with reflective learning.”
  • Reflective learning works by asking “What should I know?” This approach requires collecting all data possible both verbal and visual data. The more data we collect, the more we will know and the more we can learn. Lectures, instructions, and e3xposes are great sources of verbal data. Listen and read! Graphs, charts, and demonstrations are great visual data. Don’t just look, though. Observe!
    Take notes on all you hear, read, and see. These notes are very important when you’re collecting data.
  • As we collect data, we must also review the evidence to ensure we comprehend it. The better our comprehension of data, the better our analysis will be in the next phase. Now, this review is best suited to solitary study, meaning outside of class, away from peers and possible distractions. Reviewing notes is key. Read them aloud, rewrite them, and color-code any related points. Finally, ask yourself questions. If you lack answers, collect more data to find the answers. That is reflective learning.
  • Abstract learning works by asking “what does this mean.” To find meaning, we must first analyze any relevant knowledge we possess. Analysis reveals trends that lead to theories. Compare various bits of data, noting where you find similarities and differences. Analysis is often intuitive; focus on the relationships between facts, not the processes or details, and if you find a consistent similarity, difference, or relationship, you’ve found a trend.
  • As we notice trends, we must devise theories that explain the trends. Theories lead us to unconfirmed knowledge, and, possibly, a better way of doing things. Focus on the “larger picture” and how the trends relate to each other and the subject. When you have a conclusion, make sure you know how the evidence supports it. Above all, be patient. Theories take time to form. If you’re having trouble forming one, maybe step away from the project and come back to it later. Those are our tips for abstract learning.
  • Active learning works by asking what should I do. Armed with a general idea, the active learner must find a practical use for it. Knowledge is power (but only if we can use it), so compare the elements of the idea to your lifestyle, noting any possibly improvements. Discuss ideas with peers. Certain ideas will apply more readily to their lifestyles than your own. Problems often promote pragmatism, so when you face a challenge, see if the idea will help.
  • After knowing the application of an idea, we must then form a plan on applying it. Plans ensure we have the best chance of successfully applying the idea to our lifestyle. Your plan should be simple but not vague. That means don’t complicate things but still include the details. Discuss plans with peers; they may notice a problem or have a way to improve the plan. Once you have a plan, ensure you know how the plan will yield the desired result. Those are tips for active learning.
  • Concrete learning works by asking, well, “how does this work.” Such learning focuses on a specific task, immersing in the required techniques. By focusing on the process, we discover how something works in practice, not just theory. Go step-by-step, examining every detail. Skipping or rushing steps causes mistakes. Also, know how the process should work; it may help solve a problem you didn’t expect to encounter. Practice to improve your technique. When possible, practice on smaller obstacles or assignments before tackling the larger ones.
  • As we complete a task, we must note both the specifics of the process and the results. The more aware we are of the process and its results, the better our future reflection will be. As before, focus on the details of each step and the details of the results. Be specific! Also, consider any deviations in technique, deviations on what you were doing, but also consider outside factors that may have affected results, regardless of your technique. That is concrete learning.
  • These four modes of learning—reflective, abstract, active, and concrete—comprise the learning cycle. Together, they provide true learning, and true learning is more than simply knowing; it’s applying. As such, true learning often requires multiple cycles of each phase. By running the learning cycle multiple times, we ensure we don’t simply know something, we ensure we know what to do with what we know. Hopefully, some of this information has interested you. If it has, be sure to review Kolb’s Learning Cycle or Honey & Mumford’s Cycle.
  • Of course, you can always contact the SSTC. We’ll be happy to explain the learning cycle in further detail or help you with your academic coaching. Thanks for watching this SSTC presentation. We hope it serves you well.
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Learning Cycle An Introduction to Learning
    • 2.  Learning is using what we know to modify how we live.  To learn, we investigate, analyze, apply, and experiment. The Learning Cycle INVESTIGATION •We collect data. •We review evidence. •We use reflective learning. EXPERIMENTATION •We execute a process. •We monitor the results. •We use concrete learning. ANALYSIS •We analyze data. •We develop a theory. •We use abstract learning. APPLICATION •We find a practical use. •We devise a process. •We use active learning.
    • 3.  Learning is using what we know to modify how we live.  These four modes of learning comprise the learning cycle. Together, they provide true learning. The Learning Cycle INVESTIGATE •Reflective ANALYZE •Abstract APPLY •Active EXPERIMENT •Concrete  From birth, we utilize this cycle, making us all innate learners.  This cycle works for all topics: biking, dating, testing, etc.  The cycle moves clockwise, but any phase is a suitable start.  Each mode offers distinct uses.
    • 4.  Reflective learning works by asking “What should I know?” Learning Modes  This approach requires collecting all data possible—both verbal and visual data.  The more data we collect, the more we will know and the more we can learn.  Lectures, instructions, and exposés are great sources of verbal data. Listen and read!  Graphs, charts, and demonstrations are great visual data. Don’t just look. Observe!  Takes notes on all you hear, read, and see.
    • 5.  Reflective learning works by asking “What should I know?” Learning Modes  As we collect data, we must review the evidence to ensure we comprehend it.  The better our comprehension of data, the better our analysis will be in the next phase.  Review is best suited to solitary study.  Reviewing notes is key. Read them aloud, rewrite them, and color-code related points.  Ask yourself questions. If you lack answers, collect more data to find the answers.
    • 6.  Abstract learning works by asking “What does this mean?” Learning Modes  To find meaning, we must first analyze any relevant knowledge we possess.  Analysis reveals trends that lead to theories.  Compare various bits of data, noting where you find similarities and differences.  Analysis is often intuitive; focus on the relationships between facts, not processes.  If you find a consistent similarity, difference, or relationship, you’ve found a trend.
    • 7.  Abstract learning works by asking “What does this mean?” Learning Modes  As we notice trends, we must devise theories that explain the trends.  Theories lead us to unconfirmed knowledge and, possibly, a better way of doing things.  Focus on the “larger picture” and how the trends relate to each other and the subject.  When you have a conclusion, make sure you know how the evidence supports it.  Be patient. Theories take time to form.
    • 8.  Active learning works by asking “What should I do?” Learning Modes  Armed with a general idea, the active learner must find a practical use for it.  Knowledge is power (only if we can use it).  Compare the elements of the idea to your lifestyle, noting any possible improvements.  Discuss ideas with peers. Certain ideas will apply more readily to their lifestyles.  Problems often promote pragmatism; when you face a challenge, see if the idea will help.
    • 9.  Active learning works by asking “What should I do?” Learning Modes  After knowing the application of an idea, we must then form a plan on applying it.  Plans ensure we have the best chance of successfully applying the idea to our lifestyle.  Plans should be simple but not vague.  Discuss plans with peers; they may notice a problem or have a way to improve the plan.  Once you have a plan, ensure you know how the plan will yield the desired result.
    • 10.  Concrete learning works by asking “How does this work?” Learning Modes  Such learning focuses on a specific task, immersing in the required techniques.  By focusing on the process, we discover how something works in practice, not just theory.  Go step-by-step, examining every detail. Skipping/rushing steps causes mistakes.  Know how the process should work; it may help solve a problem you didn’t expect.  Practice to improve your technique.
    • 11.  Concrete learning works by asking “How does this work?” Learning Modes  As we complete a task, we must note both the specifics of the process and the results.  The more aware we are of the process and its results, the better our future reflection.  As before, focus on the details of each step and the details of the results. Be specific!  Consider any deviations in technique.  Consider outside factors that may have affected results, regardless of technique.
    • 12.  Learning is using what we know to modify how we live.  These four modes of learning comprise the learning cycle. Together, they provide true learning. The Learning Cycle  True learning is more than simply knowing; it’s applying.  True learning often requires multiple cycles of each phase.  Interested in your ideal mode?  Review Kolb’s Learning Cycle!  Review Honey & Mumford’s Cycle! REFLECTIVE •Investigate ABSTRACT •Analyze ACTIVE •Apply CONCRETE •Experiment
    • 13. Please Contact Us Conway 349-7872 Grand Strand 477-2113 Georgetown 520-1455 Email: sstc@hgtc.edu Website: http://www.hgtc.edu/sstc

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