In2010 outsell
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

In2010 outsell

on

  • 693 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
693
Views on SlideShare
693
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

In2010 outsell In2010 outsell Document Transcript

  •           Coursepack      Created for the Society for Scholarly Publishing’s  IN 2010 Conference  September 21‐23, 2010    By Outsell, Inc.  www.outsellinc.com       Outsell is the only research and advisory firm focused on advancing  the publishing and information industries. Our international team  provides independent, fact‐based analysis and actionable advice  about competitors, markets, operational benchmarks, and best  practices, so our clients thrive and grow in todays fast‐changing  digital and global environment.    For information about the solutions we offer publishers in the  Education market, contact Tom Walsh at twalsh@outsellinc.com    © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • Promethean Puts Personalised Learning Back On The Agenda By Kate Worlock, September 2, 2010 Promethean, a developer of whiteboards and other interactive classroom technologies, has gone back to well‐established educational principles to develop a personalised real‐time interactive system for use in classrooms. Important Details: Promethean, which is headquartered in the UK but which delivers technology solutions to 500,000 K‐12 classrooms in 100 countries around the world, has been working on a solution to a common complaint.  The limitations of student response systems (individual clickers used by students to answer questions in a whole class scenario) have traditionally included an inability to allow students to proceed at their own pace, and a lag time which can damage the pace of the lesson. Promethean’s new software is based on what it calls “real‐time personalised intervention”, or RTPI. This means that each student is sent a question direct to their Promethean ActivExpression clicker device and immediately gets a new question once that has been answered, rather than having to wait for the rest of the class. Furthermore, the system includes an adaptive learning element so that each student can proceed at their own pace. The teacher can visually track the whole class’s progress through a laptop, where questions are colour‐coded by difficulty and incorrect responses indicated with a red X. Earlier this year Promethean formed an alliance with CTB‐McGraw‐Hill, the assessment division of McGraw‐Hill Education (see Insights 28 April 2010, CTB/McGraw‐Hill Launches Community for Acuity Customers), linking Promethean’s ActivExpression clickers to CTB’s Acuity Unwired InFormative Assessment solution. Acuity UnWired instantly displays student responses and percent correct scores, and uploads student performance data to Acuity for creating reports in the future. Implications: The theory behind this approach is not new. It was previously called “drill and practice”, and is effective because students receive immediate feedback and can quickly move on to other problems, which is highly motivational for learners. Undertaking this in a classroom environment also introduces a competitive element to the process. However, even as developments like this are launched, some educators have yet to be convinced of the benefits of any digital learning solutions. Educators and even some students have complained that using technology in the classroom is a distraction ‐ one of the benefits of the Kindle in an educational setting was that students could do nothing with it but read, so they were not tempted into checking e‐mail or Tweeting (see Thinking Out Loud Education blog post 20 April 2010, Kindle Unsuitable As A TextBook Replacement ‐ Few Surprises Here Then). Good teaching is in many ways an art rather than a science, where building a relationship between educator and student is vital. Where technology can aid that process and provide motivation to learn, then real benefits will arise; however, where technology serves to distract and deter then problems will occur which will continue to hold back the development of the digital education environment. © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • Digital Textbooks Underwhelm In Higher Education…So Far By Kate Worlock, August 25, 2010  Back to school fever does not yet seem to be sending users stampeding to buy digital textbooks in favour of their print counterparts. Important Details: As the Back to School season approaches, and amidst much hype around the burgeoning success of consumer fiction e‐books, publishers and textbook retailers are doing their best to highlight their digital textbook offerings to students with money to burn. Examples of these activities include CourseSmart’s promotion of its iPhone and iPad apps, Barnes & Noble’s launch of the NOOKstudy platform (see Insights 16 July 2010, E‐Textbooks: Back In The News Again), and new products from companies like Inkling, a start‐up that has worked with McGraw‐Hill to launch four digital textbook titles which are specifically designed to take advantage of the capabilities of the iPad. Inkling is also said to have deals in place with John Wiley and Cengage Learning. Usage of e‐books in higher education has so far however remained low, for a variety of reasons (see Outsell’s May 2010 report, The Future of the Textbook Marketplace). A recently released June 2010 survey of further and higher education institutions in the UK, undertaken by Eduserv, found that most respondents (67%) indicated that less than 10% of the course modules at their institutions recommended or mandated the use of an e‐textbook. Indeed, almost 14% said that no courses recommended the use of e‐textbooks. In the main, institutional budgets for e‐book purchases were held by the library, and drivers of purchasing included the need to serve distance learners, demand from students, cost savings, shelf space issues and demand from faculty. However, predicting how spending on e‐textbooks might increase was very difficult, with more than half of respondents answering “don’t know” to this question, although 20% saw budget increasing by more than 50% over the next two years. In more than 50% of cases, any increase in spending on e‐textbooks is likely to a similar level of reduction in spending on their print counterparts.  Often, spending on e‐books had been done at the end of the academic year, when leftover budget could be safely used for more experimental purchases. Implications: Print products in these markets still have strong legs, and unless a sudden and unforeseen transformation in teaching practices is seen, this is likely to remain so for some time to come. E‐readers have not yet been able to prove that they can fulfil the range of demands apparent from both students and faculty, as indicated by the Amazon Kindle trials, and a mixed marketplace economy where faculty, students and information providers can work together to learn how digital media can best support the learning process seems the most likely future outcome. A range of factors (such as falling prices of devices and content, and an increasingly wide range of content availability) in the consumer marketplace have kick‐started the e‐books revolution there, but these factors will not be enough in the higher education marketplace. Education demands a product which is not only cheaper (and the upfront costs of devices such as the iPad mean that this criteria has not yet been fulfilled) but also delivers a better learning experience. Problems with slowness of page‐turning, and the inability to use e‐reader devices to do anything other than read, plus the challenges around integrating content with back end systems such as learning management systems, mean that there is still a long way to go before we start to approach a mass market scenario.  © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • Nixty Launches With Lofty Visions By Kate Worlock, August 11, 2010  Making open educational resources easy to find and re‐use should be a strong selling point for this new start‐up. Important Details: Nixty, which launched on 13 July, has grand plans. It claims to be “revolutionising education”, and “empowering education for everyone”. The site provides services for a range of different user types. For college‐level institutions and educators, Nixty offers the ability to create online courses using open educational resources, and to use course management tools such as grade books, discussion boards and testing environments. It’s therefore essentially an online Learning Management System (LMS) as well as a place to locate or create online courses. For students, Nixty already offers more than 200 free courses from well regarded sources such as the Khan Academy and Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s OpenCourseWare project. Future Nixty plans include developing the offering to suit K‐12 and professional development audiences as well as the college market. Pricing for the service is low. Students can access all of the current courses free of charge, while paid‐for courses will become available once they have been prepared and launched by Nixty’s educator members. Costs for educators are low: public courses, which are free for students to take, are also free to create, and Nixty will charge teachers creating paid‐for courses $4.99 per month for three courses, or $9.99 per month for nine courses. In addition, Nixty will take a 20% commission fee. This payment system will roll out in the next month. Like many other social networking applications Nixty uses a reputation system, enabling users to “vote up” or “vote down” content, giving the providers of that content “karma points” when it is voted up. All users automatically get an ePortfolio which lists the courses taken and information about the individual including details of their karma points and comments they’ve made on the site’s resources. In addition to these features, Nixty is also rolling out what it calls “WikiCourses”. Anyone can add lessons to these courses, amend existing lessons, or change the sequence of the lessons. Implications: Nixty hopes, of course, that the simplicity and usability of its interface will make it the go‐to place for colleges to cheaply and easily set up and run online courses. The company has a strong global vision as well, and understands that offering free courses could attract a large global audience reasonably quickly, with the potential for helping institutions around the world serve international students at a price point they can afford.  It’s certainly a more cost effective option than setting up a local campus ‐ Michigan State University recently closed its Dubai campus, citing lower than hoped for student numbers. Perhaps the key difference between Nixty and other online course aggregators such as iTunes U and YouTube EDU is that it enables communication between the student and the instructor as well as amongst the students ‐ this brings the Nixty experience closer to that of a traditional student, rather than a learner who works through these materials without support. As yet there is no mention of linking to paid‐for content like digital textbooks, but if instructors are going to use a system of this sort then this is a likely next step. Until then, Nixty is providing a valuable case study to see what the level of take‐up and interest might be amongst students, educators and institutions, and to learn more about how courses are created, sold and used. Nixty has built it ‐ now will the users come? © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • E‐Textbooks: Back In The News Again By Kate Worlock, July 16, 2010 With a flurry of announcements, the digital textbook game has been moved up a notch. Important Details: The first announcement came on 12 July from CourseSmart, which unveiled its Faculty Instant Access Program, a solution which enables faculty access to a library of digital content through their institution’s Learning Management System (LMS) or Campus Portal. LMS which are supported by the system include Moodle, Sakai, Desire2Learn and Blackboard, while compatible Campus Portals include SunGard Luminis, Datatel Portal and uPortal. CourseSmart claims that it can provide access to more than 90% of the most popular textbooks, and its system has long been used by faculty as a one‐stop shop for identifying and then assessing new textbooks. Initially CourseSmart is rolling the implementation out in 10 institutions; it aims to deliver a customised, flexible and lightweight program which will serve the needs of faculty who already use CourseSmart in their workflow, and make it even easier to do this. For example, many faculty already use the service for textbook evaluation, and some use it in classroom situations to show a sample problem or a graphic from the course textbook. CourseSmart’s aim is to make this even easier, increase the instances of use, and thereby accelerate the acceptance of digital course materials, with the attendant benefits which this acceptance will bring. Blackboard was also on the case, with a raft of announcements at its annual BbWorld event which included partnerships with two major college bookstore players, Barnes & Noble (B&N) and Follett, and a key higher educational publisher, McGraw‐Hill. The McGraw‐Hill deal brings Blackboard’s web‐based teaching and learning platform Blackboard Learn into close harmony with McGraw‐Hill’s Connect platform as well as with its custom publishing systems. The integration, the first of its kind between Blackboard and a major publisher, will allow students and faculty to use their Blackboard login to access the full suite of McGraw‐Hill Connect content and tools. Additionally, scores for McGraw‐Hill Connect assignments, quizzes and tests will post directly to the Blackboard gradebook. The deal with Follett gives students the ability to purchase and use digital textbooks directly in Blackboard Learn, and streamlines the way that instructors assign texts and the ease with which students can access and use them. It also provides access to Follett’s CafeScribe, an e‐textbook and social networking platform that gives students and instructors the ability to read, highlight, annotate, share notes, and form campus and worldwide study groups. The B&N deal is similar, also allowing students to purchase books directly in Blackboard Learn, as well as connecting with B&N’s newly launched NOOKstudy platform. NOOKstudy will be available from August, and provides a downloadable application for PC and Mac which B&N hopes will act as a central localised starting point for students. Not only can they access paid‐for and free digital textbook content from the Nook e‐book store, Nookstudy can also be used to organise textbooks, lecture notes, handouts and other course information. The platform is also an e‐book reader for books purchased from B&N, with the ability to open multiple textbooks simultaneously, highlight text, zoom, searc, and take notes. Notably, no NOOK e‐reader device is needed to use NOOKstudy. Implications: These announcements are the first indicators of what students starting or going back to college in Fall 2010 can come to expect. The integrations of systems is a very welcome sign that accessing digital textbook content may soon be as easy for students as finding the material in print ‐ this is a significant psychological boundary to cross. If digital services can provide demonstrable value over and above print then we should see a tipping point come sooner rather than later (see 3 May 2010 Market Report, The Future of the Textbook Market). © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • However, there remains a weary sense in some of these services that duplication of the print offering is still something to boast about. The NOOKstudy platform, for example, allows students to make notes in their e‐textbooks and highlight sections ‐ revolutionary! And the system will open a book where the student left off ‐ unbelievable! Unless you’ve heard of an inexpensive device called a bookmark. The real excitement here lies in the connection of the backend systems which will make using digital textbooks a given. Connecting with an LMS provider like Blackboard provides a win‐win situation for all parties ‐ Blackboard further consolidates its position in the LMS market, while McGraw‐Hill boost usage of Connect, and Follett and B&N serve customers through a new channel. For CourseSmart, the benefits will lie in what happens as digital course material increasingly becomes the norm. This plays directly to the rule “take the service to the customers” ‐ if Blackboard is where the students and faculty are already located, then building a bridge to those customers makes perfect sense. © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • Blackboard Acquires Elluminate and Wimba to General Acclamation By Kate Worlock, July 12, 2010 As research indicates the benefits of online learning, Blackboard opens itself up to collaboration and integration with other technology systems. Important Details:  Elluminate and Wimba provide virtual classroom technology solutions that enable educational institutions to run live courses online using audio, video, whiteboard and social learning applications. Blackboard will combine the offerings of the two companies to form a new standalone platform called Blackboard Collaborate, which will not only supplement traditional courses, but will also help support fully online courses, and other collaborative activities such as managing virtual office hours sessions, team meetings, professional development, student projects and mentoring and tutoring opportunities. Elluminate’s offerings include Live!, an electronic learning, conferencing, and online collaboration tool with note taking features, two‐way interactive video, archiving and automatic indexing of e‐learning sessions, organizational tools for teachers (pop‐up announcements, sorting of participants by hand raising, timers, and other features), whiteboarding, and various other collaboration tools. This and other products are in use in more than 1,900 higher education and K‐12 institutions in 81 countries. Wimba provides interactive collaborative technologies for K‐12 schools and post‐secondary institutions, including the Collaboration Suite, which includes four of Wimba’s communications tools: Classroom (a virtual classroom environment); Pronto (an instant messaging and voice chat tool); Voice (a live audio tool); and Create (a utility for converting Word documents to LMS‐friendly formats). These tools are used by more than 700 K‐12 and post‐secondary institutions in 28 countries. Implications:  The acquisitions of Elluminate and Wimba will set Blackboard back around $116 million, so while not a big deal in terms of cash outlay, this signals an important development in Blackboard’s approach to the market. There is a perception that the learning management system (LMS) market has become somewhat commoditised, and that Blackboard may face a struggle to increase its market share, particularly under challenging economic conditions in which early adopters already have systems in place. It has done so before through acquisition (notably WebCT and ANGEL Learning ‐ see Insights 12 May 2009, Blackboard Chalks Up Another Win with Its Acquisition of Angel Learning and Research Brief 14 October 2005, Blackboard Acquires WebCT: Learning Management’s Big Deal), but declared a truce in its lawsuit against Desire2Learn  (see Insights 13 March 2008, Latest Score: Blackboard 1 ‐ Desire2Learn 0. Industry Impact ‐ Limited) and also faces competition from open source competitors such as Moodle, and from regional players like Pearson’s Fronter, which is strong in Europe. If you can’t increase market share in your core area, the next best thing is to identify neighbouring growth areas, and invest there. Synchronous tools represent one of the fastest growing technology segments in education, and arguably the one with the greatest prospects for future growth. What Blackboard’s announcement also indicates is a movement away from viewing the LMS as the be all and end all ‐ the key now is to be able to offer a package comprised of a range of elements all of which synchronise together smoothly. This is vital for educational IT buyers ‐ tools which won’t work with products which are already well established on campus won’t be successful. So this announcement ticks a number of important boxes. It brings in tools from a fast‐growing segment of the market and ensures that they will work seamlessly with other Blackboard offerings. Additionally, it expands Blackboard’s reach into institutions which are offering distance learning and blended learning models. A May 2009 US Department of Education meta‐analysis of effectiveness studies of online, face‐to‐face, and blended learning models found that online © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • learning produced better student outcomes than face‐to‐face classes, and that blended learning offered an even “larger advantage”. Improving educational outcomes is ultimately the name of the game, and tools from Elluminate and Wimba which can help support these online and blended learning packages are already well respected and well used in the market. These acquisitions should do far more than a law suit in helping Blackboard take market share from Desire2Learn. © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • 2010: the Year of the Digital Platform By Ned May, July 5, 2010 A series of recent industry moves suggests the end of publisher attempts to create a consumer reading device. These initiatives, so prominently announced in 2009, are now giving way to efforts around digital platforms instead. That’s good news for all involved. Important Details: On June 14, 2010 News Corp announced several moves to capitalize on digital content developments. The company acquired the Skiff digital reader platform ‐ but not the actual device ‐ from the Hearst initiative of the same name, and also announced an investment in Journalism Online, and the appointment of Jon Housman as the president of its Digital Journalism Initiatives. The following day, Next Issue Media — a joint venture of News Corp, Hearst, Conde Nast, Meredith and Time Inc that is tasked with, amongst other things, developing a digital reader platform — announced that it had hired a new CEO to replace the interim CEO John Squires who came to the venture directly from Time. The new CEO, Morgan Guenther, brings an outside‐of‐publishing background but one that centers around digital media and disruptive devices, including two years as the president of TiVo. Then, on June 29, LibreDigital acquired the e‐commerce platform Symtio from Harper Collins. The technology is described as “a multi‐channel digital media platform that enables customers to purchase and access digital media ‐ including eBooks, audiobooks, music, and video ‐ online or through an in‐store retail card program.” Said another way, it is an all inclusive digital media storefront that is agnostic to walls and containers. Implications: These announcements signal the end of those short lived efforts by many publishers to build a physical e‐reader device. The Skiff announcement says as much about Hearst as it does about News Corp. First, publishers should not be in the business of manufacturing (or sourcing) devices any more than they should be in the business of building printing presses. That’s not to say that, at the time, the investments by Hearst and others were not warranted nor wise. They were both made as Amazon’s Kindle was emerging as a dominant platform (see Insights 17 September 2007, Amazon’s Kindle Device Re‐Ignites e‐book Interest), tipping the balance of power away from the content producers and toward that retailer instead. But with more competition in the device marketplace, not the least of which is Apple’s iPad, Amazon’s power has diminished (see Insights 10 September 2008, iPod? Check. Laptop? Check. Kindle? Not So Fast) and the point of competition, and thus investment, has now re‐focused around the underlying platforms. Initial speculation around the News Corp announcement was that it might indicate a lack of commitment by them in the Next Issue Media joint venture, given its outright purchase of the competing platform from Skiff. But seen in the context of this LibreDigital announcement, the appointment of Guenther to head Next Issue seems as important and strategic as any of the announcements. LibreDigital is putting in place the pieces necessary to sell any media in any locale ‐ be it an online storefront, a big box retailer, or a coffee shop.  News Corp is merely hedging its digital initiative bets, given the persistent lack of visibility into future landscape of devices, platforms, and business models. How unclear is this future? The LibreDigital announcement and Next Issue Media’s appointment of Guenther to head a digital content initiative point to how truly meaningless yesterday’s media containers may become. Pick up an iPad and you have the option to watch a TV show, a movie, or even a live sports event. You also have the option to read news, a magazine or a book ‐ with or without videos ‐ and you can listen to countless audio feeds ‐ from a live stream from around the world to an archived item from years ago. Finally, you can also play thousands of games, from © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • digital versions of childhood classics to entirely new ones that incorporate the tactile advantages of the newest digital devices. That breadth of choice means content producers will need to either make their content so compelling that at times it trumps the other experiences available or they will need to make their content so devoid of boundaries that it can be delivered as an element of any other experience outlined above. The smart money is currently doing both ‐ building out proprietary delivery platforms while also engaging in efforts of cross media and cross company collaboration. We advise all participants in the industry to do the same. © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • iPads, Xboxes, and Coffee Shops All Begin to Compete By Ned May, June 16, 2010 New devices and delivery channels are enabling consumers to obtain content in a myriad of new ways. As competition heats up around control the end user, content owners may need to rethink where and how they play. Important Details: On Monday June 14th, Microsoft announced a deal with ESPN that will provide the sports network’s content over the Xbox gaming platform. The same day, Starbucks announced that it will be providing free unlimited WiFi access within all of its company‐owned stores in the US, and in partnership with Yahoo! it will bundle in free ‘one click’ access over this network to paid content from a range of providers such as the Wall Street Journal. These announcements were on the heels of reports highlighting data that indicated global web traffic had hit an all time peak over the weekend due to immense interest in the opening games of the World Cup. Only two weeks before all this, Apple had revealed it had sold over two million iPads in less than 60 days. Implications: What do all these seemingly disparate announcements tell us about the world of publishing? Starting with the last one first, the evidence seems to suggest that the hype around the iPad was justified. With its initial sales trajectory far surpassing other Apple product launches, including the iPod and iPhone, one need not work too hard to extrapolate the implications for the ultimate adoption rates of this device. In simplest terms there is a new form of container that has now entered our lexicon. Fortunately for publishers, user experiences on this new container share some familiarity with old forms, which is one reason publishers are putting so much attention to the iPad today. The implications of this new device are fairly understandable even if some new thinking needs to be applied. However, with the ever more complex ways with which we all interact with content and with each other, context is increasingly king. Therefore it is important to look at the opportunity for content providers on the iPad in the context of an individual user’s overall time. Doing so leads us to the reason we have gathered such a diverse group of announcements in the important details section above ‐ each speaks to the growing competition for an end user’s free time as collectively they highlight the breadth of devices capable of displaying all types of different media today. As an example, an iPhone streaming live soccer over a cellular network can trump the user experience of a 60″ television hardwired to a cable line if the game is being played while the viewer is riding a train to work. Said another way, form may matter when all else is equal but rarely today is such a level playing field found ‐ especially now that new devices and delivery channels allow anyone to consume content on their own terms regardless of whether that content is classified as an interactive game, a news story, a movie, or increasingly some hybrid product not easily tagged. As a result, we are seeing efforts emerge to rationalize these experiences such as IEEE’s attempt to create a standard for enabling end user control over content ownership rights. Fortunately for content creators, the perceived need for such a standard also reflects the challenges around realizing the dream of ubiquitous content consumption today. With all the divergent devices, channels, and business relationships, more often than not if a user wants to consume content across different devices the easiest, if not the only, way to do so is to pay for the same content again. That may be great news for content owners in the short term as the novelty of new experiences is generating additional revenue, but it is not a sustainable trend. Wired magazine may have sold over 100,000 copies of its first digital edition at $4.99, but the telling data will be the level of single issues sales a year from now. © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • In the interim, all content creators are advised to look for new ways to sell and distribute their content across all these platforms as they emerge. For example, what opportunities may exist within multiplayer games or on smartphones to supplement a sport event in between games? Yes the iPad seems all but certain to take its place in this continuum of media devices but it will be only one spot of many. There is a battle brewing over what will be tomorrow’s dominant platforms and who will ultimately control access to end users across each. For all but the very largest of publishers, that battle is likely out of reach and their efforts are better served by making sure their content is enabled and ready for distribution in the broadest of ways. © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • Pearson MyLabs: Serving Students and Educators By Kate Worlock, June 2, 2010 Pearson’s well‐established MyLabs series of products now serve 54 different subject disciplines and, unusually, have aspects which serve both students and their teachers. Important Details: Pearson’s MyLabs series of text‐specific online products accompanies Pearson Education textbooks for a variety of courses including mathematics, developmental psychology, social work, history, sociology, Spanish and biology. Each MyLabs product provides a set of course materials to accompany the textbook, along with course‐management tools (powered by CourseCompass) so that educators can customize their online courses. Pearson provides students with pre‐paid access when they purchase a new, participating textbook.  Take‐up is high, with Pearson having issued six million online access codes in 2009 alone. MyLabs is a tutorial and assessment product designed to help students when they need it. First launched for mathematics, MyLabs products are now available for 54 subjects and are sold globally. The original MyMathLab has been translated into Latin American Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese, and more local language translations for other subjects are in the pipeline. The products contain a great deal of targeted practice material within a study plan, so that students can take their own assessment which provides them with feedback and pointers to additional work which can be done before a re‐test is taken. Educators can use MyLabs to set homework (either using pre‐set questions, or their own) and track student progress. MyLab is sold in much the same manner as traditional textbooks, with lecturers in both the US and the UK adopting or recommending the product to their students. Students make up the bulk of the market, but the product is also sometimes bought by institutions on behalf of their students ‐ this is becoming increasingly popular at US for‐profit colleges. In the US more purchasing is taking place at the institutional level than in the UK, where purchasing by institutions tends to be done at departmental level. Implications: Essentially, MyLabs delivers the same content that the textbook has always offered, with the added benefit of an increased amount of audio and video supplementary material, and the ability for the student to identify where they need more support, and for the system to be able to deliver that targeted help.  Like McGraw‐Hill’s Connect product (see Insights 26 May 2010, McGraw‐Hill’s LearnSmart Delivers Adaptive Learning), MyLabs was developed because of the perceived need to help improve education for students in the face of rapidly increasing class sizes, particularly in the US market. Case studies available through the MyMathLab web site help to demonstrate the ways in which faculty are using the product to improve learning outcomes. For example, DeVry University implemented MyMathLab in the summer of 2005, and reported that in the trimester immediately preceding the implementation, the percentage of students achieving A/B grades (i.e. scoring over 80% on exams) was 39%. By the summer of 2007 the percentage of on‐site, full‐campus students achieving A/B grades increased to 68.4%; overall A/B rates were 65.%. Finding solid evidence of performance improvement remains rare, and Pearson’s case studies show not only how results have been affected, but also how many ways there are to implement the same product. Pearson’s next steps are to continue the extension into other languages, and also to integrate the products more closely with other Pearson services such as eCollege, bringing the MyLabs learning platform together with student information systems. Pearson’s range of service offerings, if they are integrated well, will make the MyLabs product set increasingly difficult to compete with.   © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • McGraw‐Hill’s LearnSmart Delivers Adaptive Learning By Kate Worlock, May 26, 2010 McGraw‐Hill’s range of higher education products delivers a range of possible solutions, including customisation options for professors and adaptive solutions for students. Important Details: Amidst McGraw‐Hill’s range of print and digital solutions for higher education sit two products which provide a valuable indication of how products in this area are developing and being built to complement one another. The first is Connect, an online learning assessment and assignment solution launched in September 2009 which now covers more than 100 different course areas.  Connect is intended to solve a major instructor pain point, namely the time it takes to manually mark and grade homework assignments. As student numbers have increased over the last few years, faculty members have found it increasingly difficult to grade all the homework they wanted to assign.  Evidence from McGraw‐Hill’s extensive faculty interviews suggested that many instructors actually graded only about one third of the homework that they assigned. Connect enables educators to set up a course and plot out a syllabus within modules that include readings, homework problems, practice quizzes, and self‐paced learning plans. The instructor can configure the system to provide students with hints and help while they are working, and it automatically grades the work upon submission. The assignment engine allows for a wide variety of problem types including multiple choice questions, dynamically‐generated algorithmic problems, accounting and finance worksheets, graphing problems, matching and labelling exercises, and interactive video scenarios as well as instructor‐created content. Instructors using Connect say that the system enables students to the work more efficiently and gives them a window into each student’s work performance (through the reporting tools) that they have never had before. This enables them to better work with each student individually and keep a pulse on where the overall class is in comprehending the topics. Connect can also come equipped with an integrated eBook in the form of Connect Plus so that the student does not need to purchase a printed edition. In Connect Plus, the student can either read the eBook normally or toggle back and forth while they are doing their homework. The problems are linked to the specific sections of the book covering the topic. McGraw‐Hill is continuing to develop Connect and extend it to other subjects; it is also being positioned as a major platform for launching other products. However, Connect is not adaptive, has no built‐in artificial intelligence, and no built‐in pedagogy. This is where LearnSmart comes into play. Designed for students to use on a self‐paced basis, LearnSmart assesses the student’s knowledge of a topic on an ongoing basis and adapts the questioning approach until the student becomes proficient in the subject. The system constantly tracks both the student’s knowledge and their confidence level in their knowledge. Using these two factors, the system guides them along the learning path specific to their individual needs. LearnSmart also has powerful reporting tools that give the instructor a window into individual student performance as well as the overall class.  The system is based on research into learning theory that prescribes linkages between topics and uses a taxonomy to map proficiency from simple recall to deeper comprehension, application, and analysis. LearnSmart has been sold as a standalone product for direct student purchase and is currently being incorporated into the Connect platform so that students have access to all the course resources in one place. Implications: For so many digital education products, including WileyPlus, CengageCourse and McGraw‐Hill’s Connect and LearnSmart, the concept of the textbook remains a central tenet because it is so reassuring and familiar to the user base, and this familiarity is still vital to making a sale. At this stage of market development, most digital products are still sold bundled with a print textbook. This comes down largely to the measured pace of change in teaching practice. Teachers © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • and learning institutions are confronted with a myriad of evolving technologies and are careful to evaluate new approaches on the basis of evidence of efficacy and practicality of implementation. The challenge for all of these digital innovations is to actually improve the learning process while maintaining a sustainable level of effort for the instructor and institution. The textbook has evolved over many years of deep engagement with the market place and still reflects the generally agreed upon organising construct for a given course. Digital technology offers a potentially much deeper interaction between student and content with the ability to analyze the individual student’s performance and provide help at the point of need. Digital will continue to replace print at the rate that it proves to be efficacious and practical. Building solutions which interconnect and yet which target different customer groups in the marketplace should serve McGraw‐Hill well. The challenge will come in adapting the products so that they suit different subjects, while still maintaining the product core. But at least these digital solutions put a degree of control back into the hands of the publisher ‐ pirating an adaptive product is a very different beast to simply copying PDFs of print textbooks. Also, since no used digital market is possible, publishers can earn 100% of the revenues generated from their digital product, rather than only making money on the first sale of a textbook and then watching others earn revenues in the used book market. © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • Horizon Report Makes Its Predictions for 2010 By Kate Worlock, May 7, 2010 This year’s Horizon Report suggests that mobile delivery of educational content and services will be a key near‐term trend to watch. Important Details: The 2010 Horizon Report is the seventh in an annual series produced by the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. The report is based on the work of the New Media Consortium’s Horizon Project, a qualitative research project established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry on college and university campuses within the next five years. Each report describes six emerging technologies or practices which are likely to enter mainstream use within this period. The emerging technologies or practices covered in this year’s report, and the timeframes in which they are expected to move into the mainstream, are:  • Mobile computing (near term ‐ within the next 12 months);  • Open content (near term ‐ within the next 12 months);  • E‐books (medium term ‐ two or three years away);  • Simple augmented reality (medium term ‐ two or three years away);  • Gesture‐based computing (longer term ‐ four or five years away);  • Visual data analysis (longer term ‐ four or five years away). Implications: Mobile computing was highlighted as a near‐term trend to watch in the 2009 Horizon report as well. The report, which outlines a handful of the hundreds of mobile computing projects at higher education institutions in the US, suggests that mobile devices are increasingly the platform of choice given that they are much cheaper than desktop or laptop computers. However, what the report does not mention is the challenge for educational service providers of developing offerings for a very broad range of mobile devices. Little change, other than an increase in the amount of experimentation with mobile services, seems to have taken place between the two Horizon reports, and it seems likely that until better mobile delivery standards are available, experimentation rather than mainstream take‐up will continue to be the name of the game. The Horizon report remains well worth watching, since some of its previous predictions have been very good. In the 2008 report mobile broadband was highlighted as a developing trend in the two‐three year timeframe, and this has certainly been the case. The report has also highlighted cloud computing in the past, and indeed the use of services like Google Docs in educational settings has been worth noting. In addition to the list above, Outsell would suggest that the following trends would also be worth considering: • Customisation: increasingly, faculty members are able to refine publishers’ offerings to suit  their own courses, and in rare cases such as Dynamic Books (see Insights 8 March 2010,  Macmillan Allows Users To Dissect The Textbook) can even amend textbooks at sentence level. • DIY services: faculty are starting to create their own content, which is not necessarily being  made available as open educational resources, but as revenue‐generating offerings. A recent  example here includes the 20 textbooks developed at Florida State College at Jacksonville. © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.  
  • • Whole service offerings: While the Horizon report predicts the emergence of e‐books into the  mainstream over the next two‐three years, it seems increasingly likely that this trend may be  overtaken by the development of whole course offerings such as WileyPlus or Pearson MyLab  which go far beyond what the textbook can deliver, whether in a print or electronic format.   Contact Outsell, Inc.  Call +1 650.342.6060 Fax +1 650.342.7135 330 Primrose Road, Suite 510 Burlingame, California 94010  Call +1 617.497.9443 Fax +1 617.497.5256      763 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139  Call +44 (0)20 8090 6590 Fax +44 (0)20 7031 8101 25 Floral Street,  London, WC2E 9DS  info@outsellinc.com  www.outsellinc.com   The information, analysis, and opinions (the “Content”) contained herein are based on the qualitative and quantitative research methods of Outsell, Inc. and its staff’s extensive professional expertise in the industry. Outsell has used its best efforts and judgment in the compilation and presentation of the Content and to ensure to the best of its ability that the Content is accurate as of the date published. However, the industry information covered by this report is subject to rapid change. Outsell makes no representations or warranties, express or implied, concerning or relating to the accuracy of the Content in this report and Outsell assumes no liability related to claims concerning the Content of this report.  © 2010 Outsell, Inc. Reproduction strictly prohibited.