334 seminar2 johnatkins

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  • 1000 are outsourceable 90% in XML-first workflow
  • WileyML is very detailed, so we haven’t been able to distribute work to our regular base of composition houses.
  • Checking the XML can be a very detailed and time-consuming process, especially for complex books with lots of math, art, tables, etc., because it truly is like a new book. We don’t have the resources to run two production cycles, so we needed to find ways to streamline the process and make it parallel with book production.
  • Point 1: Need business leadership as well as production. Need to make business-wide decisions upfront about how you’ll use tags and what will be the ultimate benefit.
  • 334 seminar2 johnatkins

    1. 1. Implementing XML Workflow:The Road Taken John Atkins Professional & Trade Group John Wiley & Sons, Inc. June 2, 2010 1
    2. 2. About John Wiley & Sons Professional and Trade Group Annual Books: 1500 titles; ~600,000 pages Annual Journals: 65 titles; 527 issues; ~23,000 pages Subjects:  Business, Technology, Travel, Cooking, Architecture, Psychology, Education 2
    3. 3. Our Goals To have structured content available  Immediate customer use  For future retrieval and reuse To integrate XML into the editorial and production process  XML is as much a priority as the printed content John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 3
    4. 4. Our Strategy Get organized! Began with multiple DTDs  Books, journals, online books, articles We spent several years developing one solution for everything: Schema John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 4
    5. 5. Considerations for DevelopingBusiness Requirements What does the customer want? What would I want to be able to search, retrieve, and reuse? Am I taking into account all variant content structure (books, MRWs, journals, etc.) Can I standardize like elements across publications to create custom publications? How granular do I need to get? (rights, pedagogy, marketing) John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 5
    6. 6. How to Get XML? Up or down stream?  Write manuscripts in XML?  Pro – you have valid XML through entire publishing cycle  Con – infrastructure/resources/training - $$$$  Convert content to XML later?  Pro – leaves more of editorial process intact; experts handle the XML  Con - Separating editorial processes from XML requires reinterpretation. John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 6
    7. 7. Word Up-stream! Most authors comfortable with Word Developed templates to help structure manuscripts in production  Word is ubiquitous  Styling manuscripts more similar to traditional typemarking Style names describe semantic function  Formatting provides visual cues but does not reflect book design  Editorial focus on content, not designing in Word John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 7
    8. 8. WordMss John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 8
    9. 9. Design John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 9
    10. 10. Where’s the XML? Created by suppliers who specialize in XML preparation  Expertise doesn’t have to be in-house Use style names in our template to automate/facilitate conversion process John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 10
    11. 11. XML John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 11
    12. 12. John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc.Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 12
    13. 13. Two books in one? Processing full-text XML can be nearly equivalent to another book production cycle How do you streamline the process so that book and XML are updated in parallel? John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 13
    14. 14. Our XML Solution All titles go into XML workflow Template provides skeletal structure to facilitate XML creation  Weconvey special XML considerations separately Compositors create XML file first, and use it to drive book layout XML is ready at/near publication John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 14
    15. 15. Advantages XML is on-hand when needed most  Post-processing on request takes several weeks longer Process is predictable and manageable  And less expensive We’re building an extensive XML library John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 15
    16. 16. Trade-offs Word is flat, XML is multi-dimensional  Conversion requires some decision-making for the compositors (interpretation!). Quality control must be considered Not everything is used John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 16
    17. 17. Where We Are Now >90% of our content is converted to XML for future use Editors are trying alternative publishing formats  Custom publications  Premium Web content  Whatever comes next… John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 17
    18. 18. Words of advice… Try to get the most accurate business requirements from the start  What do you need? How much detail? How will you get it?  Updates are complicated and time-consuming to implement Capture semantics – not design Be flexible: There will be changes, so allow for them Build relationships with suppliers with expertise - we didn’t get here on our own John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 18
    19. 19. Above all… Get organized  It will save you lots of time downstream John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 19
    20. 20. <slide position=“last”> <p> THANK YOU </p> <p> And good luck!</p></slide> John Atkins/John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Society for Scholarly Publishing, June 2, 2010 20

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