Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
30 cc 3_a_j-white
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

30 cc 3_a_j-white

65

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
65
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Tools and Strategies for Content Management – Publishers’ Perspective Jabin White, Executive Director, Electronic Production-Health Sciences Elsevier Presented by: Jabin White (jabin.white@elsevier.com) Title: Tools and Strategies for Content Management Presented at: SSP Annual Meeting; Baltimore, MD Date: April 30, 2003
  • 2. Agenda • Introductions • The Problem – simple Content Management is no longer enough • Brief history of workflow, reasons for improvement • Case Study • And now for the next trick… • Conclusions2 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 3. Who is Elsevier? • Publish more than 1,800 journals, more than 2 million pages per year • Publishing imprints include Mosby, Saunders, Churchill- Livingstone, BH, and more…3 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 4. Who am I? • Started as Editorial Assistant, then Developmental Editor • Learned SGML at Mosby • Moved to Williams & Wilkins in 1997, merged with L-R in 1998 -- responsible for “front-end” SGML initiative • Moved to Harcourt Health Sciences in October, 2000, acquisition by Elsevier completed in September, 20014 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 5. The Problem • “Traditional” content management, by definition, is no longer enough • More to the point, it is: – Managing content more efficiently ($$$) – Content enrichment – Setting up content for multiple delivery streams – Preparing content to be searched/indexed more intelligently • All of these have become part of the definition of Content Management, hence the confusion5 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 6. Traditional (Old) Workflow • Manuscript submitted on paper (sometimes with disk) to Editorial office • Paper accepted for publication • Paper keyed and coded • Article laid out (paginated) in proprietary typesetting system • Proofs sent to authors, proofreaders, etc.6 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 7. Traditional Workflow (cont’d) • Changes made to pages, author queries answered • Changes inserted into proprietary typesetting files • Final pages approved • Print pages published • Typesetting files converted to SGML • Electronic product produced7 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 8. XML front ends • rethinking content & markupTraditional Publishing Process… Manuscript Galleys Pages Electronic Product (repurposed from print)8 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 9. XML front ends • rethinking content & markupProblems inserted… Changes lost in Changes made on paper media-neutral format (version management issues) Manuscript Galleys Pages Paper submissions Electronic Product (repurposed from print) Changes made to proprietary typesetting files9 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 10. XML front ends • rethinking content & markup Traditional Publishing Process… Manuscript Galleys Pages Electronic Product (repurposed from print)10 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 11. XML front ends • rethinking content & markup Problem solved? Pages Manuscript Galleys Final, corrected Galleys articles in DB Electronic Product X, Y and Z11 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 12. XML front ends • rethinking content & markup Problem solved… Pages Manuscript Galleys Final, corrected Galleys articles in DB Electronic ProductPublishers can add value and “squeeze” profits by making X, Y and Zthis part more efficient – enter CONTENT MANAGEMENT And by diversifying the product suite it offers to the market12 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 13. Major activities of the E-workflow: Production Link editorial to suppliers Production system Network delivery Websites for Editorial Science Direct, Electronic Production offices MD Consult, etc. submission implement electronic Digital workflow submission in Production implement use of tracking systems and electronic peer review13 Copyright 2003, Elsevier Jabin White, SSP 2003
  • 14. Content Management for Efficiency • “Extend” benefits of digital workflow back in the process to author submission • Benefits: – Seamless movement of files in media neutral format – Enforcement of standards begins early – No surprises – Speed, speed, and more speed • Examples: ElSubmitElsevier Editorial System; Author Gateway14 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 15. Efficiency at the Front • Committed to a suite of web-based author services • A-Team (author support team) • Goals: – Better management of peer review process – Provide tools for authors to track status of their manuscript throughout publication process – Decrease transfer time from: • Author to Editor • Editor to Referee • Editor to Production15 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 16. Case StudySubmission and Peer Review Tools
  • 17. Author Gateway • “One-stop shop” for authors’ interactions with Elsevier • Dissemination of information (author guidelines, paper tracking, marketing materials, etc.) • Fantastic feedback from marketplace17 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 18. Author Gateway18 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 19. Author Gateway19 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 20. Author Gateway20 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 21. Author Gateway21 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 22. Major activities of the E-workflow: Production Link editorial to suppliers Production system Network delivery Websites for Editorial Science Direct, Electronic Production offices MD Consult, etc. submission implement electronic Digital workflow submission in Production implement use of tracking systems and electronic peer review22 Copyright 2003, Elsevier Jabin White, SSP 2003
  • 23. CAP Workflow (Computer-Aided Production) • Began in 1997 with SGML DTD, related tools • One common global workflow, many different local production offices • All use same tools, tracking systems, etc. • All copyediting is outsourced • Submission systems, peer-review systems occur before CAP23 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 24. PTSIII (Production Tracking System) • Completely integrated between production offices and suppliers • Provides “transparent” global workflow capabilities • Oracle database with lots of XML managing workflow triggers24 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 25. CAP Workflow AUTHOR ISSUE LOGIN CORRECT. COMP. MEDIA COPY ISSUE PRODUCTS: CORRECT. CONV. EDIT COMP. PRINT SCANNING ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS S100 S200 S300 ELECTRONIC WAREHOUSE S100-unedited manuscript; S200 – edited manuscript, issue independent; S300 – edited, folioed manuscript25 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 26. The EW (Electronic Warehouse) • Massive storage facility in Amsterdam • Oracle database with proprietary extensions • Millions of articles • Today handles just journal articles, in the future will handle books • Helps in production, assembly of products26 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 27. End-to-end process…simple ProductsEditorial process Production Electronic processes Warehouse27 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 28. Ideal Content Management28 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 29. And now for the next trick! • Doing for book workflow what Elsevier has done for journals workflow • CAP workflow for books? • Vast differences in content, authoring environments • Same principles of consistency, enforcement, etc., can be applied, but very carefully29 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 30. Re-using what we’ve learned • Common DTDs, enforced centrally • Content Management standards enforced globally • Authoring/editing tools that help with standardization and enforcement – Keeping in mind the different author environment • Recognizing *when* workflows must be flexible, and when they cannot30 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 31. Conclusions • Digitization of “end” of workflow is assumed • Business case has been made for having digital files at the end of the production cycle (this little thing called the web) • How far “back” in the workflow you go depends on many factors in your organization (size, “change environment,” content types, etc) • It’s a marathon, not a sprint!31 Copyright 2003, Elsevier
  • 32. Thank You

×