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193 ssp seminar01_odoherty

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  • 1. “Quasi-Open” Access : the bepress Experience Sean O’Doherty Vice President The Berkeley Electronic Press SSP 2006 Annual Conference
  • 2. Session Overview• How and Why New Publishers Have Emerged• Examples of Scholar-Driven Publishing Efforts• The bepress Case Study – Founding Principles – Software Development – “Quasi-Open” Access – Why do Libraries Subscribe? – Reaction within the Academy – Results to Date – Lessons Learned
  • 3. How and Why New Publishers Have Emerged• Response to scholarly communication crisis• Growing availability of web-based publishing tools – Low-cost solution at a time of high budget stress – Ease of use reduces barriers to entry
  • 4. Examples of Scholar-Driven Publishing Efforts• Wealth of grassroots publishing activity coming from the academy – Institutional repositories – Noncommercial startups – Commercial startups
  • 5. The bepress Case Study• Software Developer
  • 6. The bepress Case Study• Publisher of Scholarly Journals
  • 7. The bepress Case StudyFounding PrincipleImplement business policies that impact the scholarly communicationcrisis in a positive way • For authors, efficient and timely review and publishing – Average time to publication - almost 3 years (economics, 2002) – Bepress average time to decision: 10 weeks (publication immediately after acceptance) • For libraries, low subscription pricing and no annual price increases – Average cost per journal, business & economics: $702 – Bepress average cost per journal, business & economics: $282
  • 8. The bepress Case StudySoftware Development – Editorial management software • EdiKit – Institutional repository software • DigitalCommons – Subject matter repositories • Bepress legal repository • COBRA (biostatistics)
  • 9. The bepress Case StudySoftware Development – EdiKitEdiKit is a perl-based editorial management system with the following‘must have’ features • Easy to use • Easy to customize to the workflows and policies of the individual journals, e.g. submission fees, number of reviews required • Automatically converts manuscripts from Word to PDF • Automatically tracks referee activity and emails appropriate reminders • Provides a mechanism for anonymous correspondence between reviewer and author
  • 10. The bepress Case Study• EdiKit Revision History report
  • 11. “Quasi-Open” Access• Offers middle ground between free Open Access and fee-based subscription access• Balances the need for cost recovery against authors’ and editors’ desire for maximum readership and distribution – Those without subscriptions can access any article by filling out a short form (that allows us to inform their library of their interest) – When libraries are convinced of sufficient interest in the journal, they subscribe
  • 12. The bepress Case Study
  • 13. The bepress Case Study
  • 14. “Quasi-Open” Access• Why Do Libraries Subscribe? – Moral obligation (if one’s community uses the journal, buying a subscription is the right thing to do) – (To use and not subscribe is to free ride) – By subscribing, a library will provide its community with 4 to 10 times the usage-value that it would have from quasi-open access alone – Subscribing guarantees perpetual access (to content published during period of subscription) – One model among many: strikes a balance between maximizing distribution and finding an equitable way to recover costs among those who benefit
  • 15. The bepress Case Study• Reactions within the Academy – Increased submissions to existing journals – Increased proposals for new journals• Why? – Rapid decision upon submission; quick availability (EdiKit) – Good exposure (“Quasi-Open” Access)
  • 16. The bepress Case Study• Results to Date – Profitable and self-supporting: revenue increased 55% in 2005 – 114 of 123 ARL libraries subscribing to at least one journal – Acceptance of ResearchNow Full Access to date: • 163 subscribers • OhioLink, CDL, FCLA, OCUL, and selective institutions in GWLA, COPPUL, NERL • University of Bergen, University of Paris I – Success of The Economists’ Voice (1000 subscribers in 10 months)• Why? – High quality content – Fast turnaround & high visibility attracts high quality authors, reviewers, editors
  • 17. Lessons Learned, Part I• Web-based publishing tools – Lower financial and other costs of new initiatives – Give the academy the chance to experiment – Create new opportunities for alternative business models – Push commercial publishers to rethink their ways of doing business (open access experimentation, postprints, etc.)
  • 18. Lessons Learned, Part II• Certain conventions remain true – Content must be compelling – Publishers must add value (peer review, collection of like materials, etc.) – Price is always a sensitivity
  • 19. Sean O’Doherty Vice PresidentThe Berkeley Electronic Press sean@bepress.com

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