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119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
119 sem 5_p-bluh
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119 sem 5_p-bluh

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  • 1. Content Management ofElectronic Resources: the Library Perspective Pamela Bluh Thurgood Marshall Law Library University of Maryland Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 2. “Content management is the catch phrase of the moment and its kin – WCM, EDM, and FCM – the darlings of technology acronyms. Its predecessors, document management and knowledge management along with relative newcomer, digital asset management, nip at its heels as it leads the pack as the end-all and do- all for managing today’s information imperative and accompanying overload.But while content management may purport to be all things to all people, its true power may actually lie in its flexibility to change shape to fit each new business problem set before it” (Econtent, v. 26, no. 5, May 2003, p. 26.) Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 3. •Bibliographic Accuracy • Evaluate products and minimize overlap between competing products • Be aware of publication embargoes, scope and dates of coverage • Deal with issues of licensing and copyright • Track usage statistics • Be familiar with standards • Maintain linkages • Provide security • Provide hardware and software support • Juggle budgets • Supply user support • Do it all 24/7/365 Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 4. How do librarians manage content in the digital age?• As Providers: • As Customers: – We work with – We work with our patrons to publishers, offer them the agents and resources aggregators to they require obtain the resources our patrons require Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 5. We create alphabetical lists of titles Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 6. • We create subject approaches to e-resources Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 7. • We include e-resources in our online catalogs Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 8. Alternative solutions: • Management services • Third-party management systems • Subscription agent applications • ILS vendor options Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 9. Management services: “Readers can benefit from in-depth analyses and comparative descriptions regarding pricing models available, database/journal coverage, potential inclusion of local library’s traditional journal holdings, server/file loading, update frequency, e-journal holdings changes, searching capabilities, workflow issues, usage reports, and various options.” (Michelle Sikto et al., “E- journal Management Systems: Trends, Trials, and Trade-offs.” Serials Review, v. 28, no. 3, 2002, p. 176.) Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 10. Management Systems Web Hub for Developing Administrative Metadata for Electronic Resource Management – www..library.cornell.edu/cts/elicensestudy/home/htmlGoldRush HERMES Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 11. Subscription Agents:• Experience • Using an Agent – Managing subscriptions – Convenient – Dealing with publishers – Cost Effective – Working with libraries – Consolidate subscription details• Substantial resources – Provides technical support – Offers a “one-stop-shop” – Fiscal – Human – Technical Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 12. Vendors of Integrated Library Systems• As a module of an integrated system or as a stand-alone product Electronic Resources Management Module• In partnership with an existing third party service Serials Solutions Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 13. Factors to consider:• Size of the library’s collection and number of electronic titles offered• Complexity of the library’s collection & number of aggregator packages it maintains• Need for full bibliographic records for every title• Integration of e-content management with other library functionality• Degree of control the library plans to exercise over the management process• Expertise of the library staff to deal with technology Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 14. More factors to consider:• Usage statistics• Robust security• User-friendly• Handles administrative data• Viability• Portability• Standards-compliant• Cost Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 15. The Tools are here:• Standards• Statistics• Services• Systems Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2
  • 16. The Challenge for Libraries:• To find a way to afford the resources• To manage them in a way that is consistent with the desires of our users and• within the library’s budget Society for Scholarly Publishing, Baltimore, MD, May 28, 2

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