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XML Workflows:Bill KasdorfPresident, Impressions Book and Journal ServicesMadison, Wisconsin and Ann Arbor, Michigan© Copy...
XML Workflows:XML Works!Bill KasdorfPresident, Impressions Book and Journal ServicesMadison, Wisconsin and Ann Arbor, Mich...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤ XML is no longer “cutting edge”—  It’s a core technology of the digital era
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤ XML is no longer “cutting edge”—  It’s a core technology of the digital era • Liberates content...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤ XML is no longer “cutting edge”—  It’s a core technology of the digital era • Liberates content...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤ XML is no longer “cutting edge”—  It’s a core technology of the digital era • Liberates content...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Publishers need both XML and PDF • PDF is for Electronic Page Images   —Describes appearance of ...
XML Workflows: XML Works!PDF: thinkPages
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤When do we want electronic PAGES? • Local and remote proofs during comp   —Can view, print, anno...
XML Workflows: XML Works!XML:  thinkFlexibility
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤When do we need to change the pages? • Viewing in a Web browser   —Limited fonts, lines reflow t...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility?
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future.
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future. • Publishing technol...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future. • Publishing technol...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future. • Publishing technol...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future. • Publishing technol...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future. • Publishing technol...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future. • Publishing technol...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it!
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it! • Broad agreement on basic standards
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it! • Broad agreement on basic standards • XML and PDF are a...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it! • Broad agreement on basic standards • XML and PDF are a...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it! • Broad agreement on basic standards • XML and PDF are a...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it! • Broad agreement on basic standards • XML and PDF are a...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it! • Broad agreement on basic standards • XML and PDF are a...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Here are six real-life case studies, and the different workflows they use • Converting XML from ...
Workflow #1“I’ll think about XML later,just set the damn pages.”
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Getting XML out of [any old] Quark • The sad truth: this is a common situation • Pubs haven’t an...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Case Study: Converting from Quark • History reference publisher • 50–75,000 pages set by Quark f...
3                DEITIES, THEMES, AND CONCEPTSÆGIRThe sea personified; a famous host to the gods but listed among the jötn...
<publication pub-id="NORSE" class="encyclopedia"><part type="body"><div id="NORSE.27" type="part"><label><page number="47"...
of the æsir except Thor, who was away to the east bashing trolls), theauthor reports that bright gold was used there in pl...
<!DOCTYPE html SYSTEM oebdoc101.dtd><html><head><title>Handbook of Norse Mythology</title><link rel="stylesheet" type="tex...
and will need a huge cauldron in which to brew the beer that will be consumed.The poem tells how Thor acquires the cauldro...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 1: Getting XML out of Quark   QuarkXpress                                Well Formed   ...
XML Workflows: XML book:             300-pg Works!             7–10 hrs work➤Workflow 1: Getting XML out of Quark         ...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 1: Getting XML out of Quark   QuarkXpress                                Well Formed   ...
Workflow #2“Maybe if we get organized   this will be easier.”
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Optimizing Quark for XML extraction • Start with consistent set of elements/DTD • Use STYLES, av...
XML Workflows: XML book:             300-pg Works!                                            2–3 hrs work➤Workflow 2: XML...
Workflow #3“Isn’t there some way  to automate this?”
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Using Autopage & XMLxt with Quark • Requires special software—& knowledge • The work is in the s...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Case Study: Using XML in Quark • Textbook publisher wants XML archive • Custom designed XML/Quar...
42   Web Collaboration Using Office XP and NetMeeting Project 1           Microsoft Word and Web Collaboration     To Crea...
Text in this color is Xtags/Autopage tagging.Text in this color is XML.@EXR_TTL:<$>[{<<>EXR>}][{<<>TTL>}]To Create a Hyper...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 3: Quark w/ Autopage, XMLxt Word files w/                     Quark files w/ Style Name...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 3: Quark w/ Autopage, XMLxt Word files w/                       Quark files w/ Style Na...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 3: Quark w/ Autopage, XMLxt Word files w/                           Quark files w/ Styl...
Workflow #4“Aren’t there any systems designed to use XML?”
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Composing in native XML • XML is the comp coding (no conversion) • Some systems integrate XML ed...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Case Study: Composing in native XML • Journal publisher wants to control files • Edits in Word, ...
Clinical Outcomes Following a Trial of Sertraline                            in Rheumatoid Arthritis                      ...
HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ALL ISSUES SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTSSara Gryske || Change Password || View/Change User Inf...
risks for psychosis Trials of antipsychotics in those withPD typically focus on drug-induced psychosis and exclude patient...
Statistical AnalysisWith SPSS software, we used Wilcoxons signed rank tests to test the change in rating scalesfrom baseli...
FIGURE 1. Individual effects of olanzapine on psychotic                           symptoms, motor function, and Activities...
significant, the sample size is small and fluctuating motor signs in patients with PD (as shownin Figure 1) further confou...
METHOD      43:2227-2229[Abstract]                                                        RESULTS 2.   Aarsland D, Larsen ...
Olanzapine (Zyprexa): A Novel Antipsychotic, edited by Tran PV, et al. Philadelphia, PA,      Lippincott Williams and Wilk...
<!doctype article system "appij1.dtd" [<!ENTITY S72866T1 SYSTEM"S72866T1.TIF" NDATA TIFF><!ENTITY S72866T2 SYSTEM "S72866T...
<AUTHORNAME><FIRST-NAME>James</FIRST-NAME> <MIDDLE-NAME>E.</MIDDLE-NAME> <LAST-NAME>Hewett</LAST-NAME><SUFFIX>M.A.</SUFFIX...
placebo and baseline, but the authors did not report the effect of treatment ondepression. However, they reported that ami...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 4a: Composing in native XML   Word files w/                                          PD...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 4a: Composing in native XML   Word files w/                                         PDF...
XML Workflows: XML Works!    ➤Workflow 4a: Composing in native XML       Word files w/                                    ...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Case Study: 3 products from same XML • Medical reference needed in 3 formats:   —Manual (8.5 x 1...
3                                            Lip and Oral Cavity                             (Nonepithelial tumors such as...
3                                  Lip and Oral Cavity   (Nonepithelial tumors such as those of lymphoid tissue, soft tiss...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 4b: 3 products from same XML   Word files w/                               Corrected   ...
XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Case Study: Working with XML created for a purpose other than publishing • Major scientific refe...
GENUS VIII. THERMOSPHAERA                                                            191                                  ...
<cultural-characteristics><para><species>T. aggregans</species> grows optimally under anaerobicconditions at 85&deg;C, pH ...
<differentiation><title><genus>Thermosphaera</genus></title><para>Based on 16S rDNA sequence data, <species>T. aggregans</...
<publisher>Cambridge University Press</publisher><pub-city>Cambridge</pub-city><pages>in press</pages></chapter></bibcite>...
<etymology><phonetic>Pyr.o.dic&prime;ti.a.ce.ae. </phonetic><morpheme><lang>M.L.</lang><grammar>neut. n. </grammar><source...
Stackebrandt</authoringgroup><date>1983, </date><desc-page>549</desc-page></def-pub-cite>).</def-pub></type-taxon></defini...
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  1. 1. XML Workflows:Bill KasdorfPresident, Impressions Book and Journal ServicesMadison, Wisconsin and Ann Arbor, Michigan© Copyright 2003, Impressions Book and Journal Services, Inc.
  2. 2. XML Workflows:XML Works!Bill KasdorfPresident, Impressions Book and Journal ServicesMadison, Wisconsin and Ann Arbor, Michigan© Copyright 2003, Impressions Book and Journal Services, Inc.
  3. 3. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤ XML is no longer “cutting edge”— It’s a core technology of the digital era
  4. 4. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤ XML is no longer “cutting edge”— It’s a core technology of the digital era • Liberates content from a particular presentation of that content
  5. 5. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤ XML is no longer “cutting edge”— It’s a core technology of the digital era • Liberates content from a particular presentation of that content • Enables interchange with unrelated parties allowing reformatting, manipulation
  6. 6. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤ XML is no longer “cutting edge”— It’s a core technology of the digital era • Liberates content from a particular presentation of that content • Enables interchange with unrelated parties allowing reformatting, manipulation • Most valuable archive to enable reuse, revision, adaptation to future options
  7. 7. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Publishers need both XML and PDF • PDF is for Electronic Page Images —Describes appearance of typeset page —Main virtue: Inflexibility (=stability) • XML is for Structured Information —Describes what elements are and do —Main virtue: Flexibility (=adaptability)
  8. 8. XML Workflows: XML Works!PDF: thinkPages
  9. 9. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤When do we want electronic PAGES? • Local and remote proofs during comp —Can view, print, annotate PDFs • Reliable files for film, platesetting • Same files for digital printing —Short run, on demand, course packs • Delivering pages to users over the Web • Some eBooks: e.g., ebrary, Adobe eBooks➤The best technology for these is PDF
  10. 10. XML Workflows: XML Works!XML: thinkFlexibility
  11. 11. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤When do we need to change the pages? • Viewing in a Web browser —Limited fonts, lines reflow to fit screen • Adapting to different devices, formats —Print, PC screen, PDAs, most eBooks • Using parts in new contexts • Rearranging, changing, updating • Adapting to options not invented yet➤The best technology for these is XML
  12. 12. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility?
  13. 13. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future.
  14. 14. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future. • Publishing technology’s evolving rapidly
  15. 15. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future. • Publishing technology’s evolving rapidly • Constant demand for new formats
  16. 16. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future. • Publishing technology’s evolving rapidly • Constant demand for new formats • Take advantage of new production options
  17. 17. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future. • Publishing technology’s evolving rapidly • Constant demand for new formats • Take advantage of new production options • Opportunities to license & acquire content
  18. 18. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future. • Publishing technology’s evolving rapidly • Constant demand for new formats • Take advantage of new production options • Opportunities to license & acquire content • Need to relate to non-publishing systems
  19. 19. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Think you don’t need flexibility? If you don’t now, you will in the future. • Publishing technology’s evolving rapidly • Constant demand for new formats • Take advantage of new production options • Opportunities to license & acquire content • Need to relate to non-publishing systems • Pouring money & time into conversion gets old real fast—do it right up front!
  20. 20. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it!
  21. 21. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it! • Broad agreement on basic standards
  22. 22. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it! • Broad agreement on basic standards • XML and PDF are a stable foundation
  23. 23. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it! • Broad agreement on basic standards • XML and PDF are a stable foundation • Tools & techniques are rapidly evolving
  24. 24. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it! • Broad agreement on basic standards • XML and PDF are a stable foundation • Tools & techniques are rapidly evolving • XML lets them work well together
  25. 25. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it! • Broad agreement on basic standards • XML and PDF are a stable foundation • Tools & techniques are rapidly evolving • XML lets them work well together • Experience & knowledge advancing too
  26. 26. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤The good news: it works, you can do it! • Broad agreement on basic standards • XML and PDF are a stable foundation • Tools & techniques are rapidly evolving • XML lets them work well together • Experience & knowledge advancing too➤Many possible workflows • There is no “one best way” • Remember, XML is for FLEXIBILITY!
  27. 27. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Here are six real-life case studies, and the different workflows they use • Converting XML from normal Quark files • Using XML in Quark (Autopage, XMLxt) • Composing with native XML files • Working with XML created for a purpose other than publishing • Producing 3 products from the same XML • Using an XML-based Content Mgmt. Syst.
  28. 28. Workflow #1“I’ll think about XML later,just set the damn pages.”
  29. 29. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Getting XML out of [any old] Quark • The sad truth: this is a common situation • Pubs haven’t anticipated XML (or HTML!) • Files are inconsistently coded & styled —Done by various people at various times —Focus is on visual result, not structure —“Flows” not always clear or connected • Need to get uniformly tagged XML • Here’s how we do it . . .
  30. 30. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Case Study: Converting from Quark • History reference publisher • 50–75,000 pages set by Quark freelancers • Has extensive in-house database • Needs to publish in various elec. contexts —Their own Web site, CD-ROMs —netLibrary (now OCLC) flavor of OeB —Adapt to new options (Baker & Taylor) • Linked, enriched content very valuable
  31. 31. 3 DEITIES, THEMES, AND CONCEPTSÆGIRThe sea personified; a famous host to the gods but listed among the jötnar.The name appears to be identical to a noun for “sea” in skaldic poetry, and thatnoun, or the name of the figure under discussion here, is the base word in manykennings. For example, “Ægir’s horse” is a ship, and “daughters of Ægir” arewaves. In Skáldskaparmál, Snorri says that Rán is the wife of Ægir and that theyhave nine daughters, most of whom bear names meaning “wave.” Since Rán islisted among the goddesses in the thulur and Ægir has a peaceful relationshipwith the gods, his inclusion in the thulur as a giant seems questionable. The eddic poems often show Ægir as host to the gods. Hymiskvida is set inmotion because the gods expect to visit Ægir and will need a huge cauldron inwhich to brew the beer that will be consumed. The poem tells how Thoracquires the cauldron from the giant Hymir. The next poem in Codex Regius ofthe Poetic Edda is Lokasenna, Loki’s flyting (that is, verbal duel) with the gods,and it is set at a feast hosted by Ægir. Indeed, paper manuscripts call the poemÆgisdrekka (Ægir’s Drinking Party). According to the prose header to the poem,“Ægir, who was also called Gymir, had prepared beer for the æsir.” After enu-merating the guest list (most of the æsir except Thor, who was away to the eastbashing trolls), the author reports that bright gold was used there in place of fire-light, and the beer served itself. It was a great place of sanctuary, but Loki killsÆgir’s servant Fimafeng, and Eldir, Ægir’s other servant, is the first with whomLoki exchanges words in the series of flytings that make up the poem. Loki’s lastwords are reserved for Ægir: You made the beer, Ægir, and you never more will Have a feast again; All your possessions, which are here inside, May fire play over, And may it burn your back. 47
  32. 32. <publication pub-id="NORSE" class="encyclopedia"><part type="body"><div id="NORSE.27" type="part"><label><page number="47"/>3</label><head>Deities, themes, and concepts</head></div><entry id="NORSE.28"><title>ÆGIR</title><div0 id="NORSE.29"><opener>The sea personified; a famous host to the gods but listed among thejötnar.</opener><p indent="no">The name appears to be identical to a noun for“sea” in skaldic poetry, and that noun, or the name of the figureunder discussion here, is the base word in many kennings. For example,“Ægir’s horse” is a ship, and “daughters ofÆgir” are waves. In <i>Skáldskaparmál,</i> Snorrisays that Rán is the wife of Ægir and that they have nine daughters,most of whom bear names meaning “wave.” Since Rán islisted among the goddesses in the thulur and Ægir has a peacefulrelationship with the gods, his inclusion in the thulur as a giant seemsquestionable.</p><p>The eddic poems often show Ægir as host to the gods.<i>Hymiskvida</i> is set in motion because the gods expect to visit Ægirand will need a huge cauldron in which to brew the beer that will be consumed.The poem tells how Thor acquires the cauldron from the giant Hymir. The nextpoem in <i>Codex Regius</i> of the <i>Poetic Edda</i> is <i>Lokasenna,</i>Loki’s flyting (that is, verbal duel) with the gods, and it is set at a feasthosted by Ægir. Indeed, paper manuscripts call the poem<i>Ægisdrekka</i> (Ægir’s Drinking Party). According to theprose header to the poem, “Ægir, who was also called Gymir, hadprepared beer for the æsir.” After enumerating the guest list (most
  33. 33. of the æsir except Thor, who was away to the east bashing trolls), theauthor reports that bright gold was used there in place of firelight, and the beerserved itself. It was a great place of sanctuary, but Loki kills Ægir’sservant Fimafeng, and Eldir, Ægir’s other servant, is the first withwhom Loki exchanges words in the series of flytings that make up the poem.Loki’s last words are reserved for Ægir:</p><poem><poemline>You made the beer, Ægir, and you never more will</poemline><poemline>Have a feast again;</poemline><poemline>All your possessions, which are here inside,</poemline><poemline>May fire play over,</poemline><poemline>And may it burn your back.</poemline></poem></div0></entry></part></publication>
  34. 34. <!DOCTYPE html SYSTEM oebdoc101.dtd><html><head><title>Handbook of Norse Mythology</title><link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="abc_oeb.css" title="Default" /></head><body><a id="NORSE.27"></a><h3 class="chtitle"><a id="page_47"></a>3<br/>Deities, themes, and concepts</h3><a id="NORSE.28"></a><h5 class="H1">ÆGIR</h5><a id="NORSE.29"></a><p class="opener">The sea personified; a famous host to the gods but listedamong the jötnar.</p><p class="noindent">The name appears to be identical to a noun for“sea” in skaldic poetry, and that noun, or the name of the figureunder discussion here, is the base word in many kennings. For example,“Ægir’s horse” is a ship, and “daughters ofÆgir” are waves. In <i>Skáldskaparmál,</i> Snorrisays that Rán is the wife of Ægir and that they have nine daughters,most of whom bear names meaning “wave.” Since Rán islisted among the goddesses in the thulur and Ægir has a peacefulrelationship with the gods, his inclusion in the thulur as a giant seemsquestionable.</p><p>The eddic poems often show Ægir as host to the gods.<i>Hymiskvida</i> is set in motion because the gods expect to visit Ægir
  35. 35. and will need a huge cauldron in which to brew the beer that will be consumed.The poem tells how Thor acquires the cauldron from the giant Hymir. The nextpoem in <i>Codex Regius</i> of the <i>Poetic Edda</i> is <i>Lokasenna,</i>Loki’s flyting (that is, verbal duel) with the gods, and it is set at a feasthosted by Ægir. Indeed, paper manuscripts call the poem<i>Ægisdrekka</i> (Ægir’s Drinking Party). According to theprose header to the poem, “Ægir, who was also called Gymir, hadprepared beer for the æsir.” After enumerating the guest list (mostof the æsir except Thor, who was away to the east bashing trolls), theauthor reports that bright gold was used there in place of firelight, and the beerserved itself. It was a great place of sanctuary, but Loki kills Ægir’sservant Fimafeng, and Eldir, Ægir’s other servant, is the first withwhom Loki exchanges words in the series of flytings that make up the poem.Loki’s last words are reserved for Ægir:</p><ul class="poem"><li>You made the beer, Ægir, and you never more will</li><li>Have a feast again;</li><li>All your possessions, which are here inside,</li><li>May fire play over,</li><li>And may it burn your back.</li></ul></body></html>
  36. 36. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 1: Getting XML out of Quark QuarkXpress Well Formed Valid, correct files XML files XML files Scripts + Roustabout Scripts Handwork Name HTML files Mapping Font DTD or OeB PS files Encoding DTDs Other files© Copyright 2003, Impressions Book and Journal Services, Inc.
  37. 37. XML Workflows: XML book: 300-pg Works! 7–10 hrs work➤Workflow 1: Getting XML out of Quark M QuarkXpress Well Formed Valid, correct files XML files XML files Scripts + Roustabout Scripts Handwork Name HTML files Mapping Font DTD or OeB PS files Encoding DTDs Other files© Copyright 2003, Impressions Book and Journal Services, Inc.
  38. 38. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 1: Getting XML out of Quark QuarkXpress Well Formed Valid, correct files XML files XML files Scripts + M Roustabout Scripts M M Handwork SOME TOOLS: SOME TOOLS: Name • Perl & Python HTML files • Roustabout •Mapping Xtend-Xport • Omnimark • EasyPress Atomik Font DTD orXSLT • OeB PS files & Roundtrip Encoding DTDs Other files© Copyright 2003, Impressions Book and Journal Services, Inc.
  39. 39. Workflow #2“Maybe if we get organized this will be easier.”
  40. 40. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Optimizing Quark for XML extraction • Start with consistent set of elements/DTD • Use STYLES, avoid “local formatting” —Word styles ឈ XML ឈ Xpress Tags/Xtags —Starting & ending w/ same XML helps • Link text boxes in Quark to specify flow • Use standard fonts & keep them w/ job • Limited to flat structures, no “nesting” • Extracting XML takes < half as much time
  41. 41. XML Workflows: XML book: 300-pg Works! 2–3 hrs work➤Workflow 2: XML from Optimized Quark M QuarkXpress Well Formed Valid, correct files XML files XML files Scripts + Roustabout Scripts Handwork Name HTML files Mapping Font DTD or OeB PS files Encoding DTDs Other files© Copyright 2003, Impressions Book and Journal Services, Inc.
  42. 42. Workflow #3“Isn’t there some way to automate this?”
  43. 43. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Using Autopage & XMLxt with Quark • Requires special software—& knowledge • The work is in the setup (can be extensive) • XML tags are hidden with XMLxt • XML tags are converted to Xtags • Paging is automated with Autopage • After comp, XML can be extracted • Must USE the codes: don’t subvert them! • Be careful not to interfere w/ hidden XML
  44. 44. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Case Study: Using XML in Quark • Textbook publisher wants XML archive • Custom designed XML/Quark workflow • Well-evolved coding scheme but no DTD • Uses Xtags, Autopage, and XMLxt • First use: computer manuals (print+elec.) • Starting to use for all textbook production • Totally electronic workflow (no paper) • Makes composition faster & cheaper!
  45. 45. 42 Web Collaboration Using Office XP and NetMeeting Project 1 Microsoft Word and Web Collaboration To Create a Hyperlink to an E-mail Address A In the table of contents document, select the text Contact the Authors. This text represents the hyperlink. B Click the Insert Hyperlink button on the Standard toolbar, or choose Insert, Hyperlink to open the Insert Hyperlink dialog box. C Click E-mail Address in the Link to area. This opens the dialog box shown in Figure 1.39. Enter e-mail address Figure 1.39 D Type in an E-mail address, or select one from the Recently used e-mail addresses list. As you type in an e-mail address, the prefix mailto: is automatically inserted before the address. Use the e-mail address of someone who does not mind receiving a test message from you. E Enter a Subject and ScreenTip, and click OK. When you click the hyperlink, your e-mail program opens with the e-mail address popped in the To box and the subject popped in the Subject box. F Send a test message. G Save and close the table of contents document. There are many more things that can be done with hyperlinks. But two are worth mentioning before wrapping up the topic. You can change attributes of an existing hyperlink by right-clicking the hyper- link and selecting Edit Hyperlink. At this point, you can change the displayed text that represents the hyperlink, the ScreenTip, the target frame, and the destination address. If you want to remove a hyperlink from a document, you can completely remove the hyperlink, or remove the hyperlink and leave the existing text or image. To completely remove the hyperlink, select the hyperlink and click ∂. To remove the hyperlink but leave the text or image, right-click the hyperlink and select Remove Hyperlink from the shortcut menu. To extend your knowledge… Creating Hyperlinks to Other Applications To create a hyperlink to a location in an Excel workbook, open the workbook and select a range of cells you want to jump to. Click Insert, point to Name, and click Define. Enter a name, and click OK. Go to your Word document, select the text or object that is to represent the hyperlink; then
  46. 46. Text in this color is Xtags/Autopage tagging.Text in this color is XML.@EXR_TTL:<$>[{<<>EXR>}][{<<>TTL>}]To Create a Hyperlink to an E<#45>mail Address[{<<>/TTL>}]@EXR_NL_ITEM:<$>[{<<>NL>}][{<<>ITEM>}]<@EXR_NL_NUM><#009>A<#009><@$p>In the<@TERM>[{<<>TERM>}]table of contents[{<<>/TERM>}]<@$p> document, select the text<@TERM>[{<<>TERM>}]Contact the Authors[{<<>/TERM>}]<@$p>.@EXR:<$>This text represents the hyperlink.[{<<>/ITEM>}]@EXR_NL_ITEM:<$>[{<<>XREFID="xIc031"/>}][{<<>ITEM>}]<@EXR_NL_NUM><#009>B<#009><@$p>[[SR 031V=1]]<&pbu2(,,(120,S,1,),(36,S,1,),,,,n,,,,,K,15,,,,,,,,,"Maxtor 38 GBHD:Essentials:EssentialsCollabicons:xIc031.tif",,"")><&tbu2((0,TL,1),2,20,20,,,,n,,,,,n,,,1,,,,,t,,"")>@SRLABEL:<z7>[[S 031 C=I V=1]]<&te><&g(2,1)>Click the Insert Hyperlink button on the Standard toolbar, or choose[{<<>STK>}]<U>I[{<<>/STK>}]<U>nsert, Hyperl[{<<>STK>}]<U>i[{<<>/STK>}]<U>nk to open the InsertHyperlink dialog box.[{<<>/ITEM>}]@EXR_NL_ITEM:<$>[{<<>ITEM>}]<@EXR_NL_NUM><#009>C<#009><@$p>ClickE<#45>[{<<>STK>}]<U>m[{<<>/STK>}]<U>ail Address in the <@TERM>[{<<>TERM>}]Linkto[{<<>/TERM>}]<@$p> area.@EXR:<$>This opens the dialog box shown in Figure[{<<>FIGIND NUM="39"ID="01FIG39"/>}]<&pbu2(,,(40p,S,2,),(40p,S,1,),0,0,,n,,,,,N,,,m,100,100,1,1,0,0,":WebCollP01Figs:01fig39.ps",,"")><&tbu2((2,BL,1),3,20p,1p6,,,,N,,,,,N,,,1,,,,,t,,)>[[A 01FIG39 I=Y]]<&te><&g(2,1)><!s>1.39[[AR01FIG39 T=E]].@EXR_NL_ITEM:<$>[{<<>INDEXTERM><<>PRIMARY>formatting<<>/PRIMARY><<>SECONDARY>hyperlinks<<>/SECONDARY><<>TERTIARY>e<#45>mailaddresses<<>/TERTIARY>}][{<<>/INDEXTERM>}]<<>$I~formatting;hyperlinks;e<#45>mailaddresses>[{<<>INDEXTERM><<>PRIMARY>hyperlinks<<>/PRIMARY><<>SECONDARY>e<#45>mailaddresses<<>/SECONDARY>}][{<<>/INDEXTERM>}]<<>$I~hyperlinks;e<#45>mailaddresses>[{<<>INDEXTERM><<>PRIMARY>applying<<>/PRIMARY><<>SECONDARY>hyperlinks<<>/SECONDARY><<>TERTIARY>e<#45>mailaddresses<<>/TERTIARY>}][{<<>/INDEXTERM>}]<<>$I~applying;hyperlinks;e<#45>mailaddresses>[{<<>INDEXTERM><<>PRIMARY>documents<<>/PRIMARY><<>SECONDARY>hyperlinks<
  47. 47. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 3: Quark w/ Autopage, XMLxt Word files w/ Quark files w/ Style Names embedded XML Quark w/ Scripts or Xtags Autopage & Template Conversion XMLxt Well Formed XML PDF XML files files files © Copyright 2003, Impressions Book and Journal Services, Inc.
  48. 48. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 3: Quark w/ Autopage, XMLxt Word files w/ Quark files w/ Style Names embedded XML Quark w/ Scripts or Xtags Autopage & Template Conversion XMLxt Well Formed 300-pg book: XML PDF M XML files 1 hr work files files © Copyright 2002, Impressions Book and Journal Services, Inc. (Plus the composition is WAY faster!)
  49. 49. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 3: Quark w/ Autopage, XMLxt Word files w/ Quark files w/ Style Names embedded XML Quark w/ Scripts or Xtags Autopage & M Template M Conversion XMLxt NOTE: NOTE: Not needed with Not available for Adobe InDesign Adobe InDesign Well Formed XML PDF XML files files files © Copyright 2003, Impressions Book and Journal Services, Inc.
  50. 50. Workflow #4“Aren’t there any systems designed to use XML?”
  51. 51. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Composing in native XML • XML is the comp coding (no conversion) • Some systems integrate XML editing • Can handle deep, hierarchical structures • Can do context-sensitive formatting • Maps XML structure to stylesheet • “PIs” permit “futzing” for pretty pages • Operators need to “think in XML” more • Post-comp extraction of XML can be trivial
  52. 52. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Case Study: Composing in native XML • Journal publisher wants to control files • Edits in Word, scripts/macros make XML • Buys pagination on high-end system that automates comp from fully-coded XML • Makes own corrs, submits new XML • Comp “proofs” XML, creates graphics • Uses same data for print and online pubs • Saves time and money on alts, conversion
  53. 53. Clinical Outcomes Following a Trial of Sertraline in Rheumatoid Arthritis JAMES R. SLAUGHTER, M.D., JERRY C. PARKER, PH.D. MATTHEW P. MARTENS, M.A., KAREN L. SMARR, M.A. JAMES E. HEWETT, M.A. We report an open-label trial of sertraline in the treatment of major depression in 54 consecutive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder. We initially surveyed 628 RA outpatients with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and invited those with depression to be evaluated further and treated. Eighty-four RA patients reporting depressive symptoms agreed to participate in person, and 56 met the criteria for major depressive disorder. Of these 56 patients, 54 agreed to medication treatment and were enrolled in the study. Patients were also randomized to one of three psychological treatment con- ditions, but for this study, conditions were collapsed because previous research on this sample indicated no significant between-group differences in depression after treatment. Patients were assessed with the CES-D and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression after the intervention, at 6-month follow-up, and at 15-month follow-up. At the last follow-up, 41 patients remained for assessment. In this study, sertraline was found to be a safe and efficacious treatment of depres- sion complicating RA. (Psychosomatics 2002; 43:36–41)I ndividuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience more psychological distress than healthy individualswithout RA,1,2 and research indicates that RA patients are triptyline led to significant improvement relative to baseline on several mood measures, including life dissatisfaction, self-esteem, down mood, social isolation, negative affect,especially susceptible to depression.3–9 Although several chronic fatigue, and self-blame. Although these mood mea-studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological sures may be related to major depression, they do not assessinterventions in treating depression in RA,10–12 the effec- depression per se. Sarzi Puttini et al.14 reported that de-tiveness of pharmacologic interventions is not well estab- pressed RA patients taking dothiepin (a tricyclic antidepres-lished. In a 32-week, double-blind, crossover trial of ami- sant available in Europe) experienced significant improve-triptyline, desipramine, trazodone, and placebo, Frank et ment on Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (Ham-D)15al.13 found that treatment with amitriptyline led to signifi- scores, while also improving significantly on pain scores,cant reductions in pain measures relative to both placebo when compared with placebo. These two studies, however,and baseline, but the authors did not report the effect of are the only ones identified by MEDLINE that addressedtreatment on depression. However, they reported that ami- pharmacologic treatment of depression in RA, and treatment was not the major focus of the research in these studies.Received November 2, 2000; revised October 10, 2001; accepted October In a recent study, Smarr et al.16 reported on a combined18, 2001. From the Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, University psychological-pharmacologic intervention. In this study,of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri. Address correspondence and reprint 54 subjects diagnosed with classic or definite RA were ran-requests to Dr. Slaughter, Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, Uni-versity of Missouri, One Hospital Dr, Columbia, Missouri 65212. domly divided into three groups: a group that received both Copyright ᭧ 2002 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. cognitive-behavioral therapy and an antidepressant medi-36 Psychosomatics 43:1, January-February 2002
  54. 54. HOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ALL ISSUES SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTSSara Gryske || Change Password || View/Change User Information || CiteTrack Personal Alerts ||Subscription HELP || Sign OutPsychosomatics 42:477-481, December 2001© 2001 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine Abstract of this Article Reprint (PDF) Version of this Article Similar articles found in:Olanzapine for the Treatment Psychosomatics Online PubMedof Psychosis in Patients With PubMed CitationParkinsons Disease and Search Medline for articles by: Marsh, L. || Reich, S. G.Dementia Alert me when: new articles cite this articleLaura Marsh, M.D., Constantine Lyketsos, M.D. Download to Citation Managerand Stephen G. Reich, M.D. Collections under which this article appears: Neuropsychiatric Disorders:Received February 27, 2001; revised June 28, 2001; Alzheimers Diseaseaccepted July 19, 2001. From the Morris K. UdallParkinsons Disease Research Center of Excellence atJohns Hopkins, the Neuropsychiatry Service, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and theMovement Disorders Center, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine,Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD. Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. Marsh,Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 NWolfe St. Baltimore, MD 21287. ABSTRACT TOPPsychotic symptoms are a common complication in Parkinsons disease ABSTRACTwith dementia. The authors conducted an open-label 6-week trial of INTRODUCTION METHODolanzapine preceded by a placebo lead-in in five subjects with Parkinsons RESULTSdisease, mild to moderately severe dementia, and psychosis. Four of the DISCUSSION REFERENCESsubjects terminated the trial early because of worsening motor function,sedation, or paranoia. There was no improvement in psychoticsymptoms, and functional abilities declined significantly. Olanzapine appears tobe poorly tolerated in patients with Parkinsons disease, psychotic symptoms, and dementia.Key Words: Dementia • Psychosis • Parkinsons Disease INTRODUCTION TOPPsychosis develops in up to 40% of patients with Parkinsons disease ABSTRACT(PD) and is the most common cause of nursing home INTRODUCTION METHODplacement.1 Although antiparkinsonian therapies are often implicated, RESULTSadvanced disease and cognitive impairment are additional specific DISCUSSION 2 REFERENCES
  55. 55. risks for psychosis Trials of antipsychotics in those withPD typically focus on drug-induced psychosis and exclude patients withdementia, whose response to antipsychotic medications may differ from PD patients without Ddementia. Because PD patients with dementia and psychosis are a significant source of antmorbidity, caregiver burden, and complex management issues, 3 treatment guidelines are tneeded.This study examined the efficacy and safety of olanzapine for the treatment of psychosis in ntPD patients with dementia. Olanzapine is an atypical neuroleptic with a low affinity forstriatal D2 receptors and a reduced propensity for causing extrapyramidal symptoms.4 Itsclinical qualities are similar to clozapine, an atypical neuroleptic that is generally effective and rally 5 ttolerated for psychosis in patients with PD. However, olanzapine does not have hematologicalside effects that require weekly blood monitoring. METHOD TOPSubjects ABSTRACTSubjects were recruited from the Johns Hopkins Movement INTRODUCTIONDisorders Clinic and had idiopathic PD based on the United Kingdom Brain METHOD 6 7 RESULTSBank Criteria, dementia secondary to PD based on DSM-IV criteria, and DISCUSSIONhallucinations and/or delusions for at least 4 weeks before study entry REFERENCESthat were not accounted for by another medical or psychiatric cause.Subjects were recruited only after their antiparkinsonian medications were reduced to thelowest dose tolerated with respect to motor function. All participants or their caregivers eirprovided informed consent.Trial ProceduresAssessments were conducted at screening; baseline; and Weeks 1, 2, 4, and 6.Antiparkinsonian medications were stable for at least 7 days before patient screening, which t oodincluded a physical examination, electrocardiogram, urinalysis, complete blood count, and acomprehensive chemistry panel. After a 4-to 8-day single-blind placebo lead-in, subjects who ad-in,maintained a score >2 on the Schedule for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS) mptomsHallucinations or Delusions subscale 8 were started on olanzapine (2.5 mg qhs). If treatmentresponse plateaued and the patient was tolerating olanzapine, the dose was increased in 2.5- asmg increments every 3 days (up to 15.0 mg qhs). Dose reductions occurred whenever side edeffects were intolerable.Efficacy was measured as the change in psychosis severity using the SAPS score. Secondary Sefficacy measures included the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Neuropsychiatric Inventory tricsymptom severity and caregiver distress scores, 9 and hours of sleep between 2100 and 0900. weenThe primary safety measure was the Unified Parkinsons Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor alescore.10 Additional safety assessments included orthostatic blood pressure and functional and ecognitive abilities based on the UPDRS Activities of Daily Living Scale and Mini-Mental StateExam.11
  56. 56. Statistical AnalysisWith SPSS software, we used Wilcoxons signed rank tests to test the change in rating scalesfrom baseline to final assessment (last observation carried forward). The small sample sizelimits interpretation of these analyses. RESULTS TOPMedication Dosage and Study Completion ABSTRACTFive patients (2 women, 3 men) with mild to moderately severe dementia INTRODUCTION METHODmet enrollment criteria and received olanzapine (Table 1). No patient RESULTStolerated olanzapine at a dose greater than 2.5 mg because of worsened DISCUSSIONparkinsonism, though the maximum dose prescribed was 7.5 mg for one REFERENCESnight. Subject 2 requested termination on Day 14 because of delusionalideation about the investigators that developed after he took tramadol. Subject 3 was ubjectwithdrawn on Day 15 because of worsening motor function and psychosis. Subject 4 was .withdrawn on Day 7 because of worsening motor function and excessive sedation. Subject 5was hospitalized for delirium, dehydration, and a urinary tract infection after being found erunresponsive on the floor of her home. She had not taken olanzapine for at least 24 hours.Subject 1 completed the trial but discontinued olanzapine approximately 2 months laterbecause of worsening motor function. The study was terminated because of these events andpublished reports 13 of olanzapine use in PD patients raising safety concerns. ns. View this table: TABLE 1. Demographic features and effects of olanzapine on apine [in this window] secondary outcome measures [in a new window]Medication Effects selineThe UPDRS Activities of Daily Living subscore worsened ( P<0.05) from baseline to the finalobservation ( Figure 1 and Table 1). Caregivers reported initial improvements in nocturnal sleep ntsand psychotic symptom intensity, but there were no statistically significant differences in thours of sleep, vital signs, caregiver distress, cognition, psychiatric symptom ratings, or ommotor function.
  57. 57. FIGURE 1. Individual effects of olanzapine on psychotic symptoms, motor function, and Activities of Daily Living scores View larger version (28K): [in this window] [in a new window] DISCUSSION TOPPsychosis is a common and challenging complication of PD. ABSTRACTPharmacotherapy is especially difficult because most neuroleptic INTRODUCTION 3 METHODmedications aggravate parkinsonism. Atypical antipsychotics such as RESULTSolanzapine have a lower risk of extrapyramidal side effects and may DISCUSSIONbe useful in patients with PD. However, this small open-label trial was REFERENCESassociated with functional decline, suggesting that olanzapine has limited ratelyutility for the treatment of psychosis in patients with PD and mild to moderately severedementia.Two earlier open-label studies suggest olanzapine is safe and effective for psychosis in PDpatients, but other studies describe poor tolerance. Dosage titration schedules and patient dules 14selection might explain the different outcomes. An initial study included only patientswithout dementia and a starting dose of 1.0 mg, which is not available commercially and may mmerciallyhave limited motor side effects. The final dose ranged from 2 to 15 mg (mean±SD= ean±SD=6.5±3.9 mg) and the study allowed for increases in antiparkinsonian medications after 50 cationsdays. A subsequent study 15 also reported a favorable response to an 8-week trial of weekolanzapine starting at 5 mg in PD patients with and without dementia. The patients with edementia were more likely to withdraw from the trial, primarily because of sedation. Otheranecdotal, retrospective, and prospective studies show unacceptable motor side effects with orolanzapine.13,16,17–19 In the only controlled trial, olanzapine (mean±SD peak dose=11.4±3.5 eakmg/day) caused significant worsening of parkinsonism, particularly gait and bradykinesia, drelative to clozapine (mean peak dose=25.8±13.5 mg/day). 20Subjects in our study were terminated from the trial because of worsening parkinsonism or gmedical complications. Although the effect of olanzapine on motor signs was not as
  58. 58. significant, the sample size is small and fluctuating motor signs in patients with PD (as shownin Figure 1) further confound their assessment.21 Functional abilities, however, declinedsignificantly. This corresponded to greater motor impairment in most cases, but incipientmedical conditions may also have contributed. For most patients, enhanced parkinsonianeffects occurred within the first 2 weeks, but the onset of medication intolerance varied. Apossible explanation for individual differences in extrapyramidal side effects is that diseasestage or dose of antiparkinsonian medications influence the amount of striatal synapticdopamine available to compete with olanzapine for the D2 receptor. Although it is a weak D2antagonist, olanzapine binds relatively tightly to the D2 receptor and is less likely to be rapidlydisplaced by dopamine, especially in the setting of reduced dopamine levels.22 In contrast,some other atypical antipsychotics with higher dissociation constants (e.g., clozapine orquetiapine) are more loosely bound to the D 2 receptor and are readily displaced by dopamine,thereby reducing the risk of extrapyramidal signs.The clinicopathological correlates of dementia and psychosis in PD are poorly understood, butextranigral pathology is presumed.23 Olanzapine antagonism at other receptors potentiallycontributes to nonmotor side effects, including sedation, delirium, and orthostasis, andpatients with dementia tend to be more vulnerable to these side effects. However, olanzapinedid not have adverse cognitive effects in our series, as Mini-Mental State Exam scores weregenerally stable. Recent studies show that olanzapine has procholinergic properties, mediatedvia 5-HT-6 receptor activity, that potentially offset any adverse anticholinergic effects.24,25Most atypical antipsychotic medications (olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, and clozapine)have been used with variable success for PD-related psychosis.26 The results of this smallopen-label trial, despite its shortcomings, lead us to recommend that olanzapine and otheratypical neuroleptics should be used with caution in PD patients with psychosis and dementiabecause of their potential to aggravate motor deficits and confusion, which already contributeto functional impairment and caregiver burden. ACKNOWLEDGMENTSThe authors thank Lisette Bunting, R.N., M.Sc.N. for study coordination. This study wassupported by Eli Lilly, Inc, the Morris K. Udall Parkinson s Disease Research Center ofExcellence at Johns Hopkins (NIH P50-NS-58377), and the General Clinical Research Center atJohns Hopkins University School of Medicine (National Center for Research Resources/NIHM01-RR00052). REFERENCES TOP ABSTRACT 1. Goetz CG, Stebbins GT: Risk factors for nursing home placement in INTRODUCTION advanced Parkinsons disease. Neurology 1993;
  59. 59. METHOD 43:2227-2229[Abstract] RESULTS 2. Aarsland D, Larsen JP, Cummings JL, et al: Prevalence and clinical DISCUSSION correlates of psychotic symptoms in Parkinson Disease: a REFERENCES community-based study. Arch Neurol 1999; 56:595-601[Medline] 3. Henderson MJ, Mellers JDC: Psychosis in Parkinsons disease: "between a rock and a hard en place." International Review of Psychiatry 2000; 12:319-334 4. Beasley CM, Tollefson G, Tran P, et al: Olanzapine versus placebo and haloperidol: acute d phase results of the North American double-blind olanzapine trial. Neuropsychopharmacology 1996; 14:111-123[Medline] 5. Parkinson Study Group: Low-dose clozapine for the treatment of drug-induced g-induced psychosis in Parkinsons disease. N Engl J Med 1999; 340:757-763[Abstract/Full Text] Abstract/Full 6. Hughes AJ, Daniel SE, Kilford L, et al: Accuracy of clinical diagnosis of idiopathic f Parkinsons disease: a clinico-pathological study of 100 cases. J Neurol Neurosurg ol Psychiatry 1992; 55:181-184[Abstract] 7. American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, f 4th Edition. Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Association, 1994 8. Andreasen N, Olsen S: Negative vs positive schizophrenia: definition and validation. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1982; 39:789-794[Medline] 9. Cummings JL: The Neuropsychiatric Inventory: assessing psychopathology in dementia hology patients. Neurology 1997; 48:10-1610. Fahn S, Elton RL, Members of the UPDRS Development Committee: Unified Parkinsons disease rating scale, in Recent Developments in Parkinsons Disease II, edited by Fahn S, I, Marsden CD, Goldstein M. New York, Macmillan, 198711. Folstein MF, Folstein SE, McHugh PR: "Mini-mental state": a practical method for grading method for the cognitive state of patients for the clinician. J Psychiatr Res 1975; 12:189-198[Medline]12. Mattis S: Dementia Rating Scale (DRS) Professional Manual. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources, 198813. with olanzapine. Molho ES, Factor SA: Worsening of motor features of parkinsonism with olanzapine. Mov Disord 1999; 14:1014-1016[Medline]14. Wolters EC, Jansen ENH, Tuynman-Qua HG, et al: Olanzapine in the treatment of dopaminomimetic psychosis in patients with Parkinsons disease. Neurology 1996; rology 47:1085-1087[Abstract]15. Aarsland D, Larsen JP, Lim NG, et al: Olanzapine for psychosis in patients with ents Parkinsons disease with and without dementia. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci 1999; n 11:392-394[Abstract/Full Text]16. Graham JM, Sussman JD, Ford KS, et al: Olanzapine in the treatment of hallucinosis in idiopathic Parkinsons disease: a cautionary note. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1998; 65:774-777[Abstract/Full Text]17. Friedman J: Olanzapine in the treatment of dopaminomimetic psychosis in patients with sis in patients Parkinsons disease (letter). Neurology 1998; 50:1195-119618. zapine Friedman JH, Goldstein S, Jacques C: Substituting clozapine for olanzapine in psychiatrically stable Parkinsons disease patients: results of an open label pilot study. Clin Neuropharmacol 1998; 21:285-288[Medline]19. Jimenez-Jimenez FJ, Tallon-Barranco A, Orti-Pareja M, et al: Olanzapine can worsen ne parkinsonism. Neurology 1998; 50:1183-118420. Goetz CG, Blasucci LM, Leurgans S, et al: Olanzapine and clozapine: comparative effects 789-794[Abstract/ on motor function in hallucinating PD patients. Neurology 2000; 55:789-794[Abstract/ Full Text]21. Lang AE, Fahn S: Assessment of Parkinsons disease, in Quantification of Neurologic on Deficit, edited by Munsat TL. Boston, Butterworth, 198922. ro Seeman P, Kapur S: Olanzapine binding to dopamine receptors in vitro and in vivo, in
  60. 60. Olanzapine (Zyprexa): A Novel Antipsychotic, edited by Tran PV, et al. Philadelphia, PA, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 200023. Forno LS: Neuropathology of Parkinsons disease. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 1996; 55:259-272[Medline]24. Kennedy J, Basson B, Zagar A, et al: The effects of olanzapine on Alzheimers disease assessment scale scores in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimers disease with psychosis and behavioral disturbances. J Am Geriatr Soc 2000; 48:S11125. Bymaster F, Falcone JF: Decreased binding affinity of olanzapine and clozapine for clonal human muscarinic receptor subtypes in intact CHO cells in physiological medium. Eur J Pharmacol 2000; 390:245-248[Medline]26. Workman RHJ, Stoebner D, Raicu RG: Management of psychosis and agitation in demented elderly with Parkinsons disease. Clinical Geriatrics 2000; 8:76-83 Abstract of this Article Reprint (PDF) Version of this Article Similar articles found in: Psychosomatics Online PubMed PubMed Citation Search Medline for articles by: Marsh, L. || Reich, S. G. Alert me when: new articles cite this article Download to Citation Manager Collections under which this article appears: Neuropsychiatric Disorders: Alzheimers DiseaseHOME HELP FEEDBACK SUBSCRIPTIONS ALL ISSUES SEARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS
  61. 61. <!doctype article system "appij1.dtd" [<!ENTITY S72866T1 SYSTEM"S72866T1.TIF" NDATA TIFF><!ENTITY S72866T2 SYSTEM "S72866T2.TIF"NDATA TIFF>] > <ARTICLE><HEADER><JOURNALDIRNAME=PSY><PUBLISHER-NAME>American Psychiatric Publishing,Inc.</PUBLISHER-NAME> <JOURNAL-TITLE>Psychosomatics</JOURNAL-TITLE> <ISSN>0033-3182</ISSN> <VOLUME>43</VOLUME><ISSUE>1</ISSUE> <PUB-DATE><YEAR>2002</YEAR> <SEASON>January-February</SEASON> </PUB-DATE></JOURNAL> <FIRST-PAGE></FIRST-PAGE><LAST-PAGE></LAST-PAGE><SEQUENCE></SEQUENCE><LANGUAGE>EN</LANGUAGE><LHR>Depression and Arthritis</LHR> <RHR>Slaughter <CHAR ID="ITAL">etal.</CHAR></RHR> <IMABBR>Psychosomatics</IMABBR> <ARTICLE-TYPETYPE="regular" NUMBER="1"> <TWODIGIT-ID>S7</TWODIGIT-ID><QADOC-ID>2866</QADOC-ID> <PDF FILENAME=02PSY.PDF><SUBJECTCODE="18, 24, 1"><KEYWORD>Depression</KEYWORD><KEYWORD>Sertraline</KEYWORD> <KEYWORD>RheumatoidArthritis</KEYWORD><ARTICLE-TITLE>Clinical Outcomes Following a Trial of Sertraline inRheumatoid Arthritis</ARTICLE-TITLE><AUTHOR-LIST><AUTHORNAME><FIRST-NAME>James</FIRST-NAME><MIDDLE-NAME>R.</MIDDLE-NAME> <LAST-NAME>Slaughter</LAST-NAME> <SUFFIX>M. D.</SUFFIX></AUTHORNAME><AUTHORNAME><FIRST-NAME>Jerry</FIRST-NAME> <MIDDLE-NAME>C.</MIDDLE-NAME> <LAST-NAME>Parker</LAST-NAME><SUFFIX>Ph.D.</SUFFIX></AUTHORNAME><AUTHORNAME><FIRST-NAME>Matthew</FIRST-NAME> <MIDDLE-NAME>P.</MIDDLE-NAME> <LAST-NAME>Martens</LAST-NAME><SUFFIX>M.A.</SUFFIX></AUTHORNAME><AUTHORNAME><FIRST-NAME>Karen</FIRST-NAME> <MIDDLE-NAME>L.</MIDDLE-NAME> <LAST-NAME>Smarr</LAST-NAME><SUFFIX>M.A.</SUFFIX></AUTHORNAME>
  62. 62. <AUTHORNAME><FIRST-NAME>James</FIRST-NAME> <MIDDLE-NAME>E.</MIDDLE-NAME> <LAST-NAME>Hewett</LAST-NAME><SUFFIX>M.A.</SUFFIX></AUTHORNAME></AUTHOR-LIST><ABSTRACT>We report an open-label trial of sertraline in the treatment of majordepression in 54 consecutive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients meeting DSM-IVcriteria for major depressive disorder. We initially surveyed 628 RA outpatientswith the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and invitedthose with depression to be evaluated further and treated. Eighty-four RApatients reporting depressive symptoms agreed to participate in person, and 56met the criteria for major depressive disorder. Of these 56 patients, 54 agreed tomedication treatment and were enrolled in the study. Patients were alsorandomized to one of three psychological treatment conditions, but for this study,conditions were collapsed because previous research on this sample indicatedno significant between-group differences in depression after treatment. Patientswere assessed with the CES-D and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depressionafter the intervention, at 6-month follow-up, and at 15-month follow-up. At the lastfollow-up, 41 patients remained for assessment. In this study, sertraline wasfound to be effective with both measures and at all time points in treating majordepression in the context of RA.</ABSTRACT></HEADER><BODY><SECT1><PARA><CHAR ID="DC">I</CHAR>ndividuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)experience more psychological distress than healthy individuals withoutRA,<XREF ID=S728661>1</XREF>,<XREF ID=S728662>2</XREF> andresearch indicates that RA patients are especially susceptible todepression.<XREF ID=S728663>3</XREF>&ndash;<XREFID=S728669>9</XREF> Although several studies have examined theeffectiveness of psychological interventions in treating depression in RA,<XREFID=S7286610>10</XREF>&ndash;<XREF ID=S7286612>12</XREF> theeffectiveness of pharmacologic interventions is not well established. In a 32-week, double-blind, crossover trial of amitriptyline, desipramine, trazodone, andplacebo, Frank et al.<XREF ID=S7286613>13</XREF> found that treatment withamitriptyline led to significant reductions in pain measures relative to both
  63. 63. placebo and baseline, but the authors did not report the effect of treatment ondepression. However, they reported that amitriptyline led to significantimprovement relative to baseline on several mood measures, including lifedissatisfaction, self-esteem, down mood, social isolation, negative affect, chronicfatigue, and self-blame. Although these mood measures may be related to majordepression, they do not assess depression per se. Sarzi Puttini et al.<XREFID=S7286614>14</XREF> reported that depressed RA patients taking dothiepin(a tricyclic antidepressant available in Europe) experienced significantimprovement on Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (Ham-D)<XREFID=S7286615>15</XREF> scores, while also improving significantly on painscores, when compared with placebo. These two studies, however, are the onlyones identified by <CHAR ID="ITAL">MEDLINE</CHAR> that addressedpharmacologic treatment of depression in RA, and treatment was not the majorfocus of the research in these studies.</PARA><PARA>In a recent study, Smarr et al.<XREF ID=S7286616>16</XREF>reported on a combined psychological-pharmacologic intervention. In this study,54 subjects diagnosed with classic or definite RA were randomly divided intothree groups: a group that received both cognitive-behavioral therapy and anantidepressant medication (CB-PHARM), an attention control group that receivedboth educational materials about RA and an antidepressant medication (AC-PHARM), and a control group that received the antidepressant medication only(CN-PHARM). The purpose of the study was to determine whether the CB-PHARM group would have better outcomes than either control group. Data werecollected at baseline, after the intervention, at 6-month follow-up, and at 15-month follow-up. Results indicated no significant differences in depression scoresamong the three groups, but all three groups demonstrated significantdifferences from baseline after the intervention, at 6-month follow-up, and at 15-month follow-up. The lack of significant differences on the mean scores ofvarious depression instruments among the groups indicates that subjects in the
  64. 64. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 4a: Composing in native XML Word files w/ PDF Style Names proof Recomposition PDF of final pages files M Run macros, Composition parse to DTD, w/ native (Corrs can be done hand fix XML in comp system or in editing system) Valid XML Corrected & HTML M Scripts files updated XML files© Copyright 2003, Impressions Book and Journal Services, Inc.
  65. 65. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 4a: Composing in native XML Word files w/ PDF Style Names proof Recomposition PDF of final pages files Run macros, Composition parse to DTD, w/ native 300-pg book: hand fix XML 5–10 minutes Valid XML files Corrected & updated XML M Scripts HTML files© Copyright 2003, Impressions Book and Journal Services, Inc.
  66. 66. XML Workflows: XML Works! ➤Workflow 4a: Composing in native XML Word files w/ PDF M Style Names proof Recomposition PDF of final pages filesSOME TOOLS: Run macros, Composition M• Inera eXtyles parse to DTD,• HyperVision Worx w/ native• ArborTexthand fix Epic• XMetaL XML SOME TOOLS: • Penta • Arbor- • XyVision text Valid XML Corrected & Scripts • Miles33 • Frame- HTML files updated XML • 3B2 maker files © Copyright 2003, Impressions Book and Journal Services, Inc.
  67. 67. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Case Study: 3 products from same XML • Medical reference needed in 3 formats: —Manual (8.5 x 11) is master reference —Handbook (4.5 x 8), sans forms —Also needed as Palm eBook • Edited in Word system with XML output • Content perfected during comp of Manual • All 3 formats output from final XML files • Index embedded in XML, for 3 indexes
  68. 68. 3 Lip and Oral Cavity (Nonepithelial tumors such as those of lymphoid tissue, 2 soft tissue, bone, and cartilage are not included.)C00.0 External upper lip C02.2 Ventral surface of tongue, NOS C04.9 Floor of mouth, NOSC00.1 External lower lip C02.3 Anterior two-thirds of tongue, C05.0 Hard palateC00.2 External lip, NOS NOS C05.8 Overlapping lesion of palateC00.3 Mucosa of upper lip C02.8 Overlapping lesion of tongue C05.9 Palate, NOSC00.4 Mucosa of lower lip C02.9 Tongue, NOS C06.0 Cheek mucosaC00.5 Mucosa of lip, NOS C03.0 Upper gum C06.1 Vestibule of mouthC00.6 Commissure of lip C03.1 Lower gum C06.2 Retromolar areaC00.8 Overlapping lesion of lip C03.9 Gum, NOS C06.8 Overlapping lesion of other andC00.9 Lip, NOS C04.0 Anterior floor of mouth unspecified parts of mouthC02.0 Dorsal surface of tongue, NOS C04.1 Lateral floor of mouth C06.9 Mouth, NOSC02.1 Border of tongue C04.8 Overlapping lesion of floor of mouth SUMMARY OF CHANGES • T4 lesions have been divided into T4a (resectable) and T4b (unresectable), leading to the division of Stage IV into Stage IVA, Stage IVB, and Stage IVC.ANATOMY gutter to the junction of the hard palate. Its posterior margin is the upper end of the pterygopalatine arch.Primary Site. The oral cavity extends from the skin- Retromolar Gingiva (Retromolar Trigone). This is the at-vermilion junction of the lips to the junction of the hard and tached mucosa overlying the ascending ramus of the man-soft palate above and to the line of circumvallate papillae dible from the level of the posterior surface of the last molarbelow and is divided into the following specific areas: tooth to the apex superiorly, adjacent to the tuberosity of the Mucosal Lip. The lip begins at the junction of the ver- maxilla.milion border with the skin and includes only the vermilion Floor of the Mouth. This is a semilunar space over thesurface or that portion of the lip that comes into contact with myelohyoid and hyoglossus muscles, extending from the in-the opposing lip. It is well defined into an upper and lower ner surface of the lower alveolar ridge to the undersurface oflip joined at the commissures of the mouth. the tongue. Its posterior boundary is the base of the anterior Buccal Mucosa. This includes all the membrane lining of pillar of the tonsil. It is divided into two sides by the frenu-the inner surface of the cheeks and lips from the line of lum of the tongue and contains the ostia of the submaxillarycontact of the opposing lips to the line of attachment of mu- and sublingual salivary glands.cosa of the alveolar ridge (upper and lower) and pterygo- Hard Palate. This is the semilunar area between the uppermandibular raphe. alveolar ridge and the mucous membrane covering the pal- Lower Alveolar Ridge. This refers to the mucosa overlying atine process of the maxillary palatine bones. It extends fromthe alveolar process of the mandible which extends from the the inner surface of the superior alveolar ridge to the pos-line of attachment of mucosa in the buccal gutter to the line terior edge of the palatine bone.of free mucosa of the floor of the mouth. Posteriorly it ex- Anterior Two-Thirds of the Tongue (Oral Tongue). This istends to the ascending ramus of the mandible. the freely mobile portion of the tongue that extends anteri- Upper Alveolar Ridge. This refers to the mucosa overlying orly from the line of circumvallate papillae to the undersur-the alveolar process of the maxilla which extends from the face of the tongue at the junction of the floor of the mouth.line of attachment of mucosa in the upper gingival buccal It is composed of four areas: the tip, the lateral borders, theAmerican Joint Committee on Cancer • 2002 23
  69. 69. 3 Lip and Oral Cavity (Nonepithelial tumors such as those of lymphoid tissue, soft tissue, bone, and cartilage are not included.)C00.0 External upper lip C02.3 Anterior two-thirds of C04.9 Floor of mouth, NOSC00.1 External lower lip tongue, NOS C05.0 Hard palateC00.2 External lip, NOS C02.8 Overlapping lesion of C05.8 Overlapping lesion ofC00.3 Mucosa of upper lip tongue palate 3C00.4 Mucosa of lower lip C02.9 Tongue, NOS C05.9 Palate, NOSC00.5 Mucosa of lip, NOS C03.0 Upper gum C06.0 Cheek mucosaC00.6 Commissure of lip C03.1 Lower gum C06.1 Vestibule of mouthC00.8 Overlapping lesion of lip C03.9 Gum, NOS C06.2 Retromolar areaC00.9 Lip, NOS C04.0 Anterior floor of mouth C06.8 Overlapping lesion ofC02.0 Dorsal surface of tongue, C04.1 Lateral floor of mouth other and unspecified NOS C04.8 Overlapping lesion of parts of mouthC02.1 Border of tongue floor of mouth C06.9 Mouth, NOSC02.2 Ventral surface of tongue, NOS SUMMARY OF CHANGES • T4 lesions have been divided into T4a (resectable) and T4b (unresectable), leading to the division of Stage IV into Stage IVA, Stage IVB, and Stage IVC.ANATOMYPrimary Site. The oral cavity extends from the skin-vermilion junctionof the lips to the junction of the hard and soft palate above and to the lineof circumvallate papillae below and is divided into the following specificareas: Mucosal Lip. The lip begins at the junction of the vermilion borderwith the skin and includes only the vermilion surface or that portion ofthe lip that comes into contact with the opposing lip. It is well definedinto an upper and lower lip joined at the commissures of the mouth. Buccal Mucosa. This includes all the membrane lining of the innersurface of the cheeks and lips from the line of contact of the opposing lipsto the line of attachment of mucosa of the alveolar ridge (upper and lower)and pterygomandibular raphe. Lower Alveolar Ridge. This refers to the mucosa overlying the alveolarprocess of the mandible which extends from the line of attachment ofmucosa in the buccal gutter to the line of free mucosa of the floor of themouth. Posteriorly it extends to the ascending ramus of the mandible. Upper Alveolar Ridge. This refers to the mucosa overlying the alveolarprocess of the maxilla which extends from the line of attachment of mu-cosa in the upper gingival buccal gutter to the junction of the hard palate.Its posterior margin is the upper end of the pterygopalatine arch. Retromolar Gingiva (Retromolar Trigone). This is the attached mucosaoverlying the ascending ramus of the mandible from the level of the pos-American Joint Committee on Cancer • 2002 1
  70. 70. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Workflow 4b: 3 products from same XML Word files w/ Corrected Embedded Style Names Valid XML indexing Scripts Run macros, Composition Indexed parse to DTD, in XML-based Valid XML OeB PS hand fix system files PDF for PDF for Palm Valid XML Manual Handbook eBook© Copyright 2002, Impressions Book and Journal Services, Inc.
  71. 71. XML Workflows: XML Works!➤Case Study: Working with XML created for a purpose other than publishing • Major scientific reference (many vols, yrs) • XML was created for the scientists to use —Organizes data the way they think of it —Not structured to help composition • Other examples: catalog from product database, directory for membership data • Comp uses XML, returns corrected XML
  72. 72. GENUS VIII. THERMOSPHAERA 191 T. aggregans was isolated from Obsidian Pool, a terrestrial hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA. ENRICHMENT AND ISOLATION PROCEDURES T. aggregans was originally enriched and obtained in pure culture by a newly developed procedure, which allowed the isolation of a 16S rDNA sequence-predicted, hyperthermophilic archaeum from a natural environment for the first time. This procedure is a combination of in situ 16S rDNA sequence analysis, specific cell hybridization within enrichment cultures, and “selected cell cultivation” by the use of a laser microscope (“optical tweezers”; Barns et al., 1994; Huber et al., 1995a; Beck and Huber, 1997). MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES T. aggregans can be stored in liquid nitrogen at ‫041מ‬ЊC in the presence of 5% DMSO. DIFFERENTIATION OF THE GENUS THERMOSPHAERA FROM OTHER GENERA Based on 16S rDNA sequence data, T. aggregans can be distin- guished from the genera Staphylothermus, Desulfurococcus, and Sul- fophobococcus. T. aggregans can be further distinguished from Sul- fophobococcus on the basis of different conserved bases in the 16S rDNA sequence. T. aggregans differs from Desulfurococcus and Sta-FIGURE A1.12. Platinum-shadowed cell aggregate of Thermosphaera ag- phylothermus by the lack of significant DNA similarity, the presencegregans. of cyclic tetraether lipids in its membrane and the absence of a regular cell surface lattice. FURTHER READING T. aggregans grows optimally under anaerobic conditions at Huber, R., S. Burggraf, T. Mayer, S.M. Barns, P. Rossnagel and K.O.85ЊC, pH 6.5, and in the absence of exogenous sodium chloride. Stetter. 1995. Isolation of a hyperthermophilic archaeum predictedThe optimal doubling time at 85ЊC is 110 min. The apparent by in situ RNA analysis. Nature (Lond.) 376: 57–58.activation energy for growth is about 149 kJ‫ .1מ‬No growth on Stetter, K.O. 2000. Volcanoes, hydrothermal venting, and the origin ofmeat extract, bovine heart infusion, peptone, amylose, glycogen, life. In Marit and Ernst (Editors), Volcanoes and the Environment,cellulose, cellobiose, maltose, raffinose, pyruvate, and acetate. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, in press. List of species of the genus Thermosphaera 1. Thermosphaera aggregans Huber, Dyba, Huber, Burggraf Description is the same as for the genus. and Rachel 1998b, 36.VP The mol% G ‫ ם‬C of the DNA is: 46 (Tm). agЈgre.gans. L. v. aggregare referring to the ability of the cells Type strain: M11TL, DSMZ 11486. to form grapelike aggregates. GenBank accession number (16S rRNA): X99556. Family II. Pyrodictiaceae Burggraf, Huber and Stetter 1997b, 659VP HARALD HUBER AND KARL O. STETTER Pyr.o.dicЈti.a.ce.ae. M.L. neut. n. Pyrodictium type genus of the family; -aceae ending to denote a family; M.L. fem. pl. n. Pyrodictiaceae the Pyrodictium family.Coccoid to disc-shaped cells, Pyrodictium species form a network tors. Three genera are described: Pyrodictium, Hyperthermus andof cannulae. Hyperthermophilic, maximal growth temperature Pyrolobus.between 108 and 113ЊC. Grows either chemolithoautotrophically Type genus: Pyrodictium Stetter, Konig and Stackebrandt 1984, ¨by gaining energy from the reduction of S0 or thiosulfate to H2S 270, emend. Pley and Stetter in Pley, Schipka, Gambacorta, Jan-using CO2 as sole carbon source or by fermentation. Some genera nasch, Fricke, Rachel and Stetter 1991, 251 (Effective publica-gain energy by respiration using O2 or nitrate as electron accep- tion: Stetter, Konig and Stackebrandt 1983, 549). ¨ Key to the genera of the family Pyrodictiaceae 1. Cells are discs within a network of cannulae. Obligately anaerobic; H2/S0 autotrophy and sulfur respiration with complex organic substrates. Temperature optimum: 105ЊC; temperature maxi- mum: 110ЊC. Genus I. Pyrodictium.
  73. 73. <cultural-characteristics><para><species>T. aggregans</species> grows optimally under anaerobicconditions at 85&deg;C, pH 6.5, and in the absence of exogenous sodiumchloride. The optimal doubling time at 85&deg;C is 110 min. The apparentactivation energy for growth is about 149kJ<superscript>&minus;1</superscript>. No growth on meat extract, bovine heartinfusion, peptone, amylose, glycogen, cellulose, cellobiose, maltose, raffinose,pyruvate, and acetate.</para></cultural-characteristics><ecology><para><species>T. aggregans</species> was isolated from Obsidian Pool, aterrestrial hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA.</para></ecology></fdi><enrichment><title></title><para><species>T. aggregans</species> was originally enriched and obtained inpure culture by a newly developed procedure, which allowed the isolation of a16S rDNA sequence-predicted, hyperthermophilic archaeum from a naturalenvironment for the first time. This procedure is a combination of <emphasisdisplay="italic">in situ</emphasis> 16S rDNA sequence analysis, specific cellhybridization within enrichment cultures, and &ldquo;selected cellcultivation&rdquo; by the use of a laser microscope (&ldquo;opticaltweezers&rdquo;; <pub-cite cite-ref="phy1a.0047">Barns et al., 1994</pub-cite>;<pub-cite cite-ref="phy2.491">Huber et al., 1995a</pub-cite>; <pub-cite cite-ref="phy2.486">Beck and Huber, 1997</pub-cite>).</para></enrichment><maintenance><title></title><para><species>T. aggregans</species> can be stored in liquid nitrogen at&minus;140&deg;C in the presence of 5% DMSO.</para></maintenance>
  74. 74. <differentiation><title><genus>Thermosphaera</genus></title><para>Based on 16S rDNA sequence data, <species>T. aggregans</species>can be distinguished from the genera <genus>Staphylothermus</genus>,<genus>Desulfurococcus</genus>, and <genus>Sulfophobococcus</genus>.<species>T. aggregans</species> can be further distinguished from<genus>Sulfophobococcus</genus> on the basis of different conserved bases inthe 16S rDNA sequence. <species>T. aggregans</species> differs from<genus>Desulfurococcus</genus> and <genus>Staphylothermus</genus> bythe lack of significant DNA similarity, the presence of cyclic tetraether lipids in itsmembrane and the absence of a regular cell surface lattice.</para></differentiation><reading><bibcite biblio-id="phy2.491"><article><author><wholename>Huber, R.</wholename></author><author><wholename>S. Burggraf</wholename></author><author><wholename>T. Mayer</wholename></author><author><wholename>S.M. Barns</wholename></author><author><wholename>P. Rossnagel</wholename></author><author><wholename>K.O. Stetter</wholename></author><year>1995</year><pubtitle>Isolation of a hyperthermophilic archaeumpredicted by <emphasis display="italic">in situ</emphasis> RNAanalysis</pubtitle><journalabbrev>Nature (Lond.)</journalabbrev><volume>376</volume><pages>57&ndash;58</pages></article></bibcite><bibcite><chapter><author><wholename>Stetter, K.O.</wholename></author><year>2000</year><pubtitle>Volcanoes, hydrothermal venting, and the origin oflife</pubtitle><editor><wholename>Marit</wholename></editor><editor><wholename>Ernst</wholename></editor><parenttitle>Volcanoes andthe Environment</parenttitle>
  75. 75. <publisher>Cambridge University Press</publisher><pub-city>Cambridge</pub-city><pages>in press</pages></chapter></bibcite></reading><species-structure><title><genus>Thermosphaera</genus></title><species-list><species-desc><species-valid><def-pub><taxon-id><species>Thermosphaera aggregans</species></taxon-id><def-pub-cite cite-ref="phy1a.0050" validator="vp"><authoringgroup>Huber,Dyba, Huber, Burggraf and Rachel</authoringgroup><date>1998b,</date><desc-page>36</desc-page>.</def-pub-cite></def-pub><etymology><phonetic>ag&prime;gre.gans. </phonetic><morpheme><lang>L.</lang><grammar>v. </grammar><source>aggregare </source><trans>referringto the ability of the cells to form grapelikeaggregates.</trans></morpheme></etymology><feature-para>Description is the same as for the genus.</feature-para><dnabase-ratio>46 (<emphasisdisplay="italic">T<subscript>m</subscript></emphasis>).</dnabase-ratio><strain-ref><cc-combo><cc-num>M11TL, DSMZ 11486.</cc-num><genbank> X99556.</genbank></cc-combo></strain-ref></species-valid></species-desc></species-list></species-structure></genus-chapter></family-structure><family-structure name="pyrodictiaceae"><chap-head><title></title><def-pub><taxon-id><family>Pyrodictiaceae</family></taxon-id> <def-pub-cite cite-ref="phy2.874" validator="vp"><authoringgroup>Burggraf, Huber andStetter</authoringgroup><date>1997b, </date><desc-page>659</desc-page></def-pub-cite></def-pub><author><name>Harald </name><lname>Huber </lname></author><author><name>Karl </name><initial>O.</initial><lname>Stetter</lname></author>
  76. 76. <etymology><phonetic>Pyr.o.dic&prime;ti.a.ce.ae. </phonetic><morpheme><lang>M.L.</lang><grammar>neut. n. </grammar><source>Pyrodictium</source><trans>type genus of the family; </trans><source>-aceae</source><trans>ending to denote a family; </trans><lang>M.L.</lang><grammar>fem. pl. n. </grammar><source>Pyrodictiaceae</source><trans>the <?Pub _font Posture="italic">Pyrodictium<?Pub /_font>family.</trans></morpheme></etymology></chap-head><definition><feature-para><salient-pt>Coccoid to disc-shaped cells,<genus>Pyrodictium</genus> species form a network of cannulae</salient-pt>.<salient-pt>Hyperthermophilic</salient-pt>, maximal growth temperaturebetween 108 and 113&deg;C. <salient-pt>Grows either chemolithoautotrophicallyby gaining energy from the reduction of S<superscript>0</superscript></salient-pt> <salient-pt>or thiosulfate to H<subscript>2</subscript>S</salient-pt> usingCO<subscript>2</subscript> as sole carbon source <salient-pt>or byfermentation</salient-pt>. Some genera gain energy by respiration usingO<subscript>2</subscript> or nitrate as electron acceptors. Three genera aredescribed: <genus>Pyrodictium</genus>, <genus>Hyperthermus</genus> and<genus>Pyrolobus</genus>.</feature-para><type-taxon rank="genus"><def-pub><taxon-id><genus>Pyrodictium</genus></taxon-id> <def-pub-cite cite-ref="phy1a.0015"><authoringgroup>Stetter, K&ouml;nig andStackebrandt</authoringgroup><date>1984, </date><desc-page>270,</desc-page></def-pub-cite> emend. <def-pub-cite cite-ref="phy1a.0007"><authoringgroup>Pley and Stetter <emphasisdisplay="italic">in</emphasis> Pley, Schipka, Gambacorta, Jannasch, Fricke,Rachel and Stetter</authoringgroup><date>1991, </date><desc-page>251</desc-page></def-pub-cite>(Effective publication: <def-pub-cite cite-ref="phy1a.0003"><authoringgroup>Stetter, K&ouml;nig and
  77. 77. Stackebrandt</authoringgroup><date>1983, </date><desc-page>549</desc-page></def-pub-cite>).</def-pub></type-taxon></definition><key><list list-type="ordered" numbering="arabic"><head>Key to the genera of thefamily <family>Pyrodictiaceae</family></head><item><para>Cells are discs within a network of cannulae. Obligately anaerobic;H<subscript>2</subscript>/S<superscript>0</superscript> autotrophy and sulfurrespiration with complex organic substrates. Temperature optimum: 105&deg;C;temperature maximum: 110&deg;C.</para><para>Genus I. <genus>Pyrodictium</genus>.</para>
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