Phraseology	  in	  academic	  L2	  discourse:	  the	  use	  of	  mul7-­‐words	  units	  in	  a	  CMC	  university	  contex...
Introduc7on:	  mul7-­‐words	  units	  •  A	  “na7ve-­‐like	  selec7on”	  (Pawley	  &	  Syder,	  1983)	  of	  MWU	  – is	  ...
Defini7on	  •  the	  co-­‐occurrence	  of	  a	  form	  or	  a	  lemma	  of	  a	  lexical	  item	  and	  one	  or	  more	  a...
Background	  •  prerequisite	  for	  proficient	  language	  use	  (Cowie	  1998;	  Sinclair	  1991;	  Wray	  2002)	  •  No...
Agreement	  on	  key	  aspects	  •  na7ve-­‐like	  competence	  only	  at	  advanced	  levels	  (Granger	  1998)	  	  –  l...
Academic	  vocabulary	  •  Na7on	  2001:	  1.  High	  frequency	  vocabulary	  2.  Academic	  vocabulary:	  used	  across	...
Academic	  phraseology	  	  •  Biber	  2004;	  Cowie	  1997;	  Oakey,	  2002;	  Hyland	  2012,	  Simpson-­‐Vlach,	  Ellis	...
Research	  ques7ons	  •  How	  do	  advanced	  learners	  of	  Italian	  as	  a	  second	  language	  compare	  against	  ...
Data	  •  Interac7ons	  in	  online	  forums	  	  •  five	  edi7ons	  (2004-­‐2009)	  of	  a	  postgraduate	  Master	  prog...
Learner	  corpus	  •  1.432.923	  tokens	  – 1.116.994	  (88	  NS	  )	  – 315.929	  (56	  NNS	  )	  •  23	  different	  L1:...
Analysis:	  two	  perspec7ves	  •  general	  phraseology	  	  –  VERB-­‐NOUN	  combina7ons	  (op7onal	  slots)	  •  avere	...
General	  MWU	  ≥	  2	  per	  million	  words	  not	  significantly	  different	  
“Robust”	  general	  MWU	  “Robust”	  (Li	  and	  SchmiV	  2010)	  combina7ons:	  frequency	  >	  20	  per	  million	  wor...
Robust	  MWU:	  examples	  VN	   NS	   NNS	   NADJ	   NS	   NNS	  Avere	  paura	  (be	  afraid)	  	   158,2	   37,6	   scu...
Lexical	  diversity	  of	  general	  MWU	  Type/token	  ra7o	  (Guiraud	  index)	  of	  VN	  and	  NADJ	  combina7ons	  (p...
Academic	  MWU	  (per	  million	  words)	  p	  value	  =	  0.0001	  149	  types	  77	  types	  
Discussion:	  general	  MWU	  1.  Evidence	  against	  previous	  literature:	  advanced	  learners	  do	  not	  undersuse...
Medium	  or	  low-­‐frequency	  MWU	  never	  used	  by	  learners	  	  •  avere	  luogo	  (17,9;	  take	  place:	  accade...
NNS:	  repe77on	  of	  paVerns	  •  different	  word	  forms	  	  •  (for	  VN	  combina7ons):	  other	  elements	  inserte...
Avere	  bisogno:	  NNS	  paVerns	  present	  indica7ve	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	 ...
Avere	  bisogno:	  NNS	  paVerns	  •  inser7on	  of	  op7onal	  elements	  within	  the	  VN	  combina7on:	  – is	  very	 ...
Avere	  bisogno:	  NS	  paVerns	  non	  credo	  abbiano	  bisogno	  di	  una	  spiegazione	  	  	  	  	  	  	  [I	  don’t	...
Avere	  bisogno:	  NS	  paVerns	  •  inser7on	  of	  op7onal	  elements	  within	  the	  combina7on:	  –  is	  more	  comm...
General	  MWU:	  summary	  •  the	  use	  of	  MWU	  in	  na7ve	  and	  non	  na7ve	  speakers	  does	  not	  differ	  in	 ...
Academic	  MWU	  •  AIWL:	  from	  academic	  wriVen	  corpus	  (Spina	  2010)	  –  403	  lemmas	  –  200	  MWU	  (4	  mos...
Academic	  MWU	  in	  NS	  and	  NNS	  •  75	  are	  exclusively	  used	  by	  NS	  	  •  connected	  with	  discursive	  ...
Incomplete	  knowledge	  of	  academic	  MWU	  	  •  stylis7cally	  inaccurate	  sentences	  –  La	  domanda	  numero	  1	...
Conclusions/1	  •  Advanced	  learners	  make	  an	  extensive	  use	  of	  general	  MWU	  •  they	  produce	  a	  restri...
Conclusions/2	  •  recent	  achievements	  in	  SLA:	  high	  token	  frequency	  –  important	  role	  in	  the	  entrenc...
Academic	  phraseology	  •  gap	  between	  NS/NNS	  phraseological	  competence	  	  •  NNS	  tend	  to	  rely	  on	  cre...
Thank	  you	  for	  your	  aVen7on!	  	  	  stefania.spina@unistrapg.it	  
References	  •  Biber	  D.	  (2004).	  “Lexical	  bundles	  in	  academic	  speech	  and	  wri7ng”.	  In	  Lewandowska	  -...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Phraseology in academic L2 discourse: the use of multi-words units in a CMC university context. Presentation at Learner Corpora 2013, May 16-17, 2013, Università di Padova

943 views
715 views

Published on

Phraseology in academic L2 discourse: the use of multi-words units in a CMC university context. Presentation at the conference "Compiling and using learner corpora to teach and assess productive and interactive skills in foreign languages at university level" (Università di Padova, maggio 2013)

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
943
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Phraseology in academic L2 discourse: the use of multi-words units in a CMC university context. Presentation at Learner Corpora 2013, May 16-17, 2013, Università di Padova

  1. 1. Phraseology  in  academic  L2  discourse:  the  use  of  mul7-­‐words  units  in  a  CMC  university  context  Stefania  Spina  Learner  Corpora  2013,  May  16-­‐17,  2013,  Università  di  Padova  
  2. 2. Introduc7on:  mul7-­‐words  units  •  A  “na7ve-­‐like  selec7on”  (Pawley  &  Syder,  1983)  of  MWU  – is  essen7al  for  learners’  successful  language  processing,  comprehension,  use  and  for  a  growth  in  fluency  – overlap  with  other  units  of  analysis  (Cogni7ve  Grammar,  Construc7on  Grammar,  Corpus  Linguis7cs):  “phraseologism”,  “construc7on”,  “paVern”,  “n-­‐gram”,  “colloca7on)    
  3. 3. Defini7on  •  the  co-­‐occurrence  of  a  form  or  a  lemma  of  a  lexical  item  and  one  or  more  addi2onal  linguis2c  elements  of  various  kinds  which  func2ons  as  one  seman2c  unit  in  a  clause  or  sentence  and  whose  frequency  of  co-­‐occurrence  is  larger  than  expected  on  the  basis  of  chance  (Gries  2008:  3)  
  4. 4. Background  •  prerequisite  for  proficient  language  use  (Cowie  1998;  Sinclair  1991;  Wray  2002)  •  Non-­‐na7ve  speakers  experience  problems  with  WMU  (Howarth  1998;  Nesselhauf  2005;  Wray  2002,  SchmiV  2004;  Granger  &  Meunier  2008)  
  5. 5. Agreement  on  key  aspects  •  na7ve-­‐like  competence  only  at  advanced  levels  (Granger  1998)    –  learners  first  acquire  simple  lexical  units  and  few  formulaic  sequences  with  pragma7c  value  (Wray  2002)  •  Come  va?      //    How  are  you?  •  Learners  underuse  MWU;  instead,  they  rely  on  (Howarth  1998):  –  avoidance  –  transfer  –  transla7ons  from  L1    –  experimenta7on:  sequences  generated  by  rules  rather  than  lexical  rou7nes  (Foster  2001)  •  key  role  of  frequency  (Ellis  2002):    –  processed  holis7cally    –  automa7c  access    –  absence  of  analysis  of  internal  structure    –  processing  advantages  (Millar  2011)  
  6. 6. Academic  vocabulary  •  Na7on  2001:  1.  High  frequency  vocabulary  2.  Academic  vocabulary:  used  across  all  academic  disciplines    3.  Technical  vocabulary:  occurs  in  specific  subject  areas  4.  Low  fequency  vocabulary    
  7. 7. Academic  phraseology    •  Biber  2004;  Cowie  1997;  Oakey,  2002;  Hyland  2012,  Simpson-­‐Vlach,  Ellis  2010      •  academic  wri7ng:  larger  stock  of  prefabricated  phrases  than  news  or  fic7on  (Hyland  2008)  •  discursive  and  textual  func7ons  ojen  used  in  academic  contexts    –  exemplifying  –  formula7ng  hypothesis  –  linking  ideas  –  drawing  conclusions  –  …  
  8. 8. Research  ques7ons  •  How  do  advanced  learners  of  Italian  as  a  second  language  compare  against  na7ve  speakers  in  the  use  of  general  MWU?  •  To  what  extent  and  in  which  ways  do  both  na7ve  speakers  and  advanced  learners  of  Italian  as  a  second  language  use  academic  MWU?  
  9. 9. Data  •  Interac7ons  in  online  forums    •  five  edi7ons  (2004-­‐2009)  of  a  postgraduate  Master  programme  in  “The  teaching  of  Italian  as  a  Second  Language”      •  3  academic  forums  (the  same  for  NS  and  NNS):    – Sociolinguis7cs  – Classroom  interac7on  – Conversa7on  analisys    
  10. 10. Learner  corpus  •  1.432.923  tokens  – 1.116.994  (88  NS  )  – 315.929  (56  NNS  )  •  23  different  L1:  – Spanish,  Greek,  Portuguese,  Chinese,  Persian,  French,  Swedish,  Korean,  Polish,  Armenian,  Albanian,  Arabic,  Vietnamese,  Kazakh,  Filipino,  Ukrainian,  Serbian,  English,  Romanian,  Hebrew,  Russian,  Indonesian  and  Flemish  – Xml  annotated,  pos-­‐tagged  and  lemma7zed  
  11. 11. Analysis:  two  perspec7ves  •  general  phraseology    –  VERB-­‐NOUN  combina7ons  (op7onal  slots)  •  avere  bisogno  [need  /have  need]    •  avere  molto  bisogno  [have  great  need]  •  avere  veramente  un  gran  bisogno  [really  have  great  need]  –  NOUN-­‐ADJECTIVE  combina7ons  •  tempo  libero  [free  7me],  crisi  economica  [economic  crisis]  •  academic  phraseology  –  use  of  MWU  included  in  the  AIWL:  Academic  Italian  Word  List  (Spina  2010)  
  12. 12. General  MWU  ≥  2  per  million  words  not  significantly  different  
  13. 13. “Robust”  general  MWU  “Robust”  (Li  and  SchmiV  2010)  combina7ons:  frequency  >  20  per  million  words  (p  value  <  0,0001)  
  14. 14. Robust  MWU:  examples  VN   NS   NNS   NADJ   NS   NNS  Avere  paura  (be  afraid)     158,2   37,6   scuola  elementare  (elementary  school)  136,1   64,4    Fare  una  domanda  (ask  a  ques2on)  151,9   65,3    essere  umano  (human  being)  47,4   16,1    Avere  bisogno  (need)   148,7   89,5   vita  quo7diana  (everyday  life)  37,7   29,5  Fare  parte  (be  part  of)   142,4     89,5   esempio  concreto  (concrete  example)    37,7   8  Frequency  (per  million  words)  of  robust  MWU  with  higher  frequencies  in  NNS  
  15. 15. Lexical  diversity  of  general  MWU  Type/token  ra7o  (Guiraud  index)  of  VN  and  NADJ  combina7ons  (p  value  <  0,0001)  
  16. 16. Academic  MWU  (per  million  words)  p  value  =  0.0001  149  types  77  types  
  17. 17. Discussion:  general  MWU  1.  Evidence  against  previous  literature:  advanced  learners  do  not  undersuse  MWU  in  terms  of  overall  frequency  (Siyanova,  SchmiV  2008)  2.  common  MWU  (highest  frequency  ranks):  more  occurrences  in  NNS.    –  "LiBle  wonder  then  that,  stripped  of  the  confidence  and  ease  we  take  for  granted  in  our  first  language  flow,  we  regularly  clutch  for  the  words  we  feel  safe  with:  our  ‘lexical  teddy  bears’”.  (Hasselgren,  1994:  237)    3.  NNS  show  a  limited  capability  of  using  diversified  VN  and  NOUN-­‐ADJ  combina7ons    
  18. 18. Medium  or  low-­‐frequency  MWU  never  used  by  learners    •  avere  luogo  (17,9;  take  place:  accadere)  •  fare  leva  (17;  leverage)  •  avere  7more  (14,3;  be  afraid:  avere  paura)  •  sorgere  un  dubbio  (14,3;  raise  a  doubt:  avere,  venire  un  dubbio)  •  soVolineare  la  differenza  (8,05;  underline  the  difference:  notare  la  differenza)  •  dare  rilievo  (7,1;  highlight:  dare  importanza)  •  situazione  imbarazzante  (13,4;  embarrassing  situa2on)  •  livello  culturale  (12,5:  cultural  level)  •  differenza  sostanziale  (11,6;  substan2al  difference)  •  considerazione  personale  (11,6;  personal  considera2on)  •  apertura  mentale  (10,7;  open-­‐mindedness)  •  conoscenza  reciproca  (8,9;  mutual  knowledge)  
  19. 19. NNS:  repe77on  of  paVerns  •  different  word  forms    •  (for  VN  combina7ons):  other  elements  inserted  within  the  combina7ons  •  avere  bisogno  (need):  NS   NNS  rank   4   6  frequency  per  million  words   89,5     148,7  
  20. 20. Avere  bisogno:  NNS  paVerns  present  indica7ve                                                                              ho/hai/ha…  present  condi7onal    avrei/avrebbe…      op7onal  adverb  (più/davvero)        bisogno        di  gli  alunni  hanno  bisogno  di  ordinare  e  struBurare  alcune  regole            [students  need  to  order  and  structure  some  rules]  avrei  bisogno  di  avere  le  vostre  considerazioni  in  merito            [I  would  need  to  have  your  considera7ons  about  that]    
  21. 21. Avere  bisogno:  NNS  paVerns  •  inser7on  of  op7onal  elements  within  the  VN  combina7on:  – is  very  rare  (6%  of  the  total)  – involves  only  two  dis7nct  adverbs:  più  (more)  and  davvero  (really)    •  gli  alunni  piccoli  hanno  più  bisogno  della  cura  dell’insegnante    [young  pupils  need  more  the  care  of  the  teacher]  – never  involves  adjec7ves  
  22. 22. Avere  bisogno:  NS  paVerns  non  credo  abbiano  bisogno  di  una  spiegazione              [I  don’t  think  they  need  an  explana7on]  se  l  insegnante  avesse  bisogno  di  scrivere  qualcosa  alla  lavagna            [if  the  teacher  would  need  to  write  something  on  the  blackboard]    indica7ve                                                                              ho/hai/ha…  subjunc7ve  abbia/avesse…    op7onal  adverb  (più/davvero/proprio/ancora/meno/soltanto…)  op7onal  adjec7ve  assoluto/immediato/urgente/gran      bisogno      di  present  condi7onal    avrei/avrebbe…  Infini7ve  avere/averne  
  23. 23. Avere  bisogno:  NS  paVerns  •  inser7on  of  op7onal  elements  within  the  combina7on:  –  is  more  common  (21%  of  the  total)  –  involves  several  dis7nct  adverbs:  più  (more),  davvero  (really),  in  realtà  (actually),  addiriBura  (even),  soltanto  (only)…    –  involves  several  dis7nct  adjec7ves:  assoluto  (absolute),  grande  (great),  immediato  (immediate),  urgente  (urgent)  •  Spesso  gli  studen2  hanno  un  immediato  bisogno  di  apprendere  l’italiano      [Ojen  students  have  an  immediate  need  to  learn  Italian]  
  24. 24. General  MWU:  summary  •  the  use  of  MWU  in  na7ve  and  non  na7ve  speakers  does  not  differ  in  quan7ty,  but  in  distribu7on  and  in  quality:    – NNS  tend  to  use  very  frequently  a  restricted  set  of  combina7ons  (Lorenz  1999)  and,  within  this  set,  to  repeat  few  similar  paVerns    – NS  tend  to  diversify  the  selec7on  of  lexical  elements  
  25. 25. Academic  MWU  •  AIWL:  from  academic  wriVen  corpus  (Spina  2010)  –  403  lemmas  –  200  MWU  (4  most  produc7ve  POS  sequences  in  Italian):  •  adjec7ve-­‐noun  (neBa  dis2nzione  /  clear  dis2nc2on);  •  noun-­‐adjec7ve  (prospeSva  teorica  /  theore2cal  perspec2ve);  •  noun  preposi7on  noun    (ambito  di  studio    /  field  of  study);  •  verb-­‐noun  (affrontare  un  tema  /  address  an  issue)    
  26. 26. Academic  MWU  in  NS  and  NNS  •  75  are  exclusively  used  by  NS    •  connected  with  discursive  and  textual  func7ons  ojen  needed  in  academic  contexts:  –  presen7ng  arguments  (affrontare  un  tema,  porre/affrontare  un  problema,  introdurre  un  conceBo,  porre  le  premesse)  –  focusing  (porre  laccento,  fondamentale  importanza,  grande  rilievo)  –  defining  (dare  una  definizione)  –  adop7ng  a  point  of  view/posi7on  (chiave  di  leBura,  prendere  aBo,  avere  una  valenza/un  valore,  assumere  una  posizione)  –  categorizing  and  including  (neBa  dis2nzione/separazione,  tracciare  una  linea,  stabilire  un  criterio)    –  drawing  conclusions  (ulteriore  approfondimento)    
  27. 27. Incomplete  knowledge  of  academic  MWU    •  stylis7cally  inaccurate  sentences  –  La  domanda  numero  1  ci  porge  (pone)  un  bel  problema  [Ques2on  1  poses  a  big  problem]  •  grama7cally  or  morphosintac7cally  incorrect  sentences  –  Cerchiamo  di  fare  dis2nzione  tre  le  forme  (una)  [lets  try  to  make  a  dis7nc7on  between  the  forms]  –  È  importante  adesso  fare  la  dis2nzione  chiara  (una)    [its  important  now  to  make  a  clear  dis7nc7on]  •  NNS  construct  a  relevant  propor7on  of  their  academic  language  from  rules  rather  than  from  lexicalized  rou7nes  
  28. 28. Conclusions/1  •  Advanced  learners  make  an  extensive  use  of  general  MWU  •  they  produce  a  restricted  set  of    general  VN  and  NADJ  combina7on  with  a  higher  frequency  compared  to  NS;    •  within  this  restricted  set,  they  tend  to  repeat  many  7mes  the  same  few  paVerns  •  what  most  dis7nguishes  the  NS  and  NNS  combina7ons  is  their  degree  of  differen7a7on:  the  frequency  of  types.    
  29. 29. Conclusions/2  •  recent  achievements  in  SLA:  high  token  frequency  –  important  role  in  the  entrenchment  of  MWU  within  a  linguis7c  system,  which  underlies  their  acquisi7on  (Ellis  2002)    –  affects  the  degree  to  which  MWU  are  processed  holis7cally;    •  high  type  frequency  –  is  the  evidence  that  MWU  are  used  frequently  with  diversified  elements  (verbs  and  nouns);    –  reinforces  their  representa7onal  schema    •  MWU  produced  by  advanced  NNS:  lower  type  frequency  –  type  frequency:  one  of  the  criteria  for  instruc7ng  learners  on  a  scale  of  difficulty  of  produc7on.      –  “high  type  frequency  prac7ce  may  be  necessary  for  learners  to  achieve  produc7ve  use  of  the  construc7on.”  (Ellis  and  Collins  2009:332)    
  30. 30. Academic  phraseology  •  gap  between  NS/NNS  phraseological  competence    •  NNS  tend  to  rely  on  crea7vity  rather  than  make  an  extensive  use  of  prefabricated  chunks.  •  strong  need  for  specific  and  explicit  instruc7on  on  academic  MWU    •  "This  phraseological  competence  makes  a  significant  contribu7on  to  the  language  proficiency  which  foreign  students  need  to  develop  to  communicate  effec7vely  in  an  academic  se|ng".  (Cowie  1997:43)  
  31. 31. Thank  you  for  your  aVen7on!      stefania.spina@unistrapg.it  
  32. 32. References  •  Biber  D.  (2004).  “Lexical  bundles  in  academic  speech  and  wri7ng”.  In  Lewandowska  -­‐  Tomaszczyk,  B.  (Ed.).  Prac2cal  Applica2ons  in  Language  and  Computers  (Proceedings  of  PALC  2003).  Peter  Lang:  165–178.  •  Cowie  A.  P.  (1997).  “Phraseology  in  formal  academic  prose”.  In  Aarts,  J.,  de  Mönnink,  I.  and  Wekker  H.  (Ed.).  Studies  in  English  Language  and  Teaching  In  Honour  of  Flor  Aarts.  Rodopi:  43–56.  •  Ellis,  N.  C.  (2002a).  Frequency  Effects  in  Language  Processing  and  Acquisi7on.  Studies  in  Second  Language  Acquisi2on,  24,  143-­‐188.  •  Ellis,  N.  C.,  &  Collins,  L.  (2009).  Input  and  Second  Language  Acquisi7on:  The  roles  of  frequency,  form  and  func7on.  Introduc7on  to  the  special  issue.  Modern  Language  Journal,  93,  329-­‐335.  •  Foster,  P.  (2001).  Rules  and  rou7nes:  A  considera7on  of  their  role  in  task-­‐based  language  produc7on  of  na7ve  and  non-­‐na7ve  speakers.  In  M.  Bygate,  P.  Skehan,  &  M.  Swain  (Eds.),  Researching  pedagogic  tasks:  Second  language  learning,  teaching,  and  tes2ng  (pp.  75-­‐97).  London:  Pearson.  •  Granger,  S.  (1998).  Prefabricated  paVerns  in  advanced  EFL  wri7ng:  colloca7ons  and  formulae.  In  A.  Cowie  (Ed.),  Phraseology:  theory,  analysis  and  applica2ons  (pp.  145-­‐160).  Oxford:  Oxford  University  Press.  •  Granger,  S.,  &  Meunier,  F.  (Eds.).  (2008).  Phraseology.  An  interdisciplinary  perspec2ve.  Amsterdam:  John  Benjamins.  •  Gries,  S.  Th.  (2008).  Phraseology  and  linguis7c  theory:  a  brief  survey.  In  S.  Granger,  &  F.  Meunier  (Eds.),  Phraseology:  an  interdisciplinary  perspec2ve  (pp.  3-­‐25).  Amsterdam:  John  Benjamins.  •  Hasselgren,  A.  (1994).  Lexical  Teddy  Bears  and  Advanced  Learners:  A  Study  into  the  Ways  Norwegian  Students  Cope  with  English  Vocabulary.  Interna2onal  Journal  of  Applied  Linguis2cs,  4(2),  237-­‐258.  •  Howarth,  P.  (1998).  Phraseology  and  second  language  proficiency.  Applied  Linguis2cs,  19(1),  24-­‐44.  •  Hyland,  K.  (2008a).  Academic  clusters:  Text  paVerning  in  published  and  postgraduate  wri7ng.  Interna7onal  Journal  of  Applied  Linguis7cs,  18,  41–62.  •  Li,  J.,  &  SchmiV,  N.  (2010).  "The  development  of  colloca7on  use  in  academic  texts  by  advanced  L2  learners:  A  mul7ple  case-­‐study  approach".  In  D.  Wood  (Ed.),  Perspec2ves  on  Formulaic  Language:  Acquisi2on  and  Communica2on.  London:  Con7nuum.  •  Lorenz  G.R.  (1999).  Adjec2ve  Intensifica2on  -­‐  Learners  versus  Na2ve  Speakers.  A  Corpus  Study  of  Argumenta2ve  Wri2ng.  Amsterdam/Atlanta:  Rodopi.    •  Millar,  N.  (2011).  The  Processing  of  Malformed  Formulaic  Language.  Applied  Linguis2cs,  32(2),  129-­‐148.  •  Na7on  I.  S.  P.  (2001).  Learning  vocabulary  in  another  language.  Cambridge  University  Press.  •  Nesselhauf,  N.  (2005).  Colloca2ons  in  a  learner  corpus.  Amsterdam:  John  Benjamins.  •  Oakey  D.  (2002).  “Formulaic  language  in  English  academic  wri7ng:  A  corpus-­‐based  study  of  the  formal  and  func7onal  varia7on  of  a  lexical  phrase  in  different  academic  disciplines”.  In  Reppen,  R.,  Fitzmaurice,  S.M.  and  Biber,  D.  (Eds.),  Using  Corpora  to  Explore  Linguis2c  Varia2on,  London:  Longman,  pp.  111-­‐129.  •  Pawley,  A.,  &  Syder,  F.  H.  (1983).  Two  puzzles  for  linguis7c  theory:  na7ve-­‐like  selec7on  and  na7ve-­‐like  fluency.  In  J.  C.  Richards  &  R.  W.  Schmidt  (Eds.),  Language  and  communica2on  (pp.  191-­‐226).  New  York:  Longman.    •  SchmiV,  N.  (Ed.).  (2004).  Formulaic  Sequences.  Acquisi2on,  processing  and  use.  Amsterdam:  John  Benjamins.    •  Simpson-­‐Vlach,  R.,  &  Ellis,  N.  (2010).  “An  academic  formulas  list:  New  methods  in  phrase-­‐ology  research”.  Applied  Linguis2cs,  31,  487–512.  •  Sinclair,  J.  (1991).  Corpus,  Concordance,  Colloca2on.  Oxford:  Oxford  University  Press.    •  Siyanova,  A.  and  SchmiV,  N.  (2008).  “L2  learner  produc7on  and  processing  of  colloca7on:  A  mul7-­‐study  perspec7ve”.  Modern  Language  Review,  64  (3):  429-­‐458.  •  Spina  S.  (2010).  “AIWL:  una  lista  di  frequenza  dell’italiano  accademico”.  in  Bolasco  S.,  Chiari  I.,  Giuliano  L.  (Eds.).  Sta2s2cal  Analysis  of  Textual  Data.  Proceedings  of  the  10th  Conference  JADT  (Rome,  9-­‐11  june  2010).  Editrice  universitaria  LED:  1317-­‐1325.  •  Wray,  A.  (2002).  Formulaic  language  and  the  lexicon.  Cambridge:  Cambridge  University  Press.    

×