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New facultyorientation bhc_fall11

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  • It is vital that faculty and/or staff clearly document incidents of disruptive behavior so an accurate record may be maintained.Specifics of the event should be recorded in chronological order.Write it down, do not include psychological jargon or speculation.Do not editorialize—STICK TO THE FACTS OF THE INCIDENT/SITUATION.Stress the unacceptable conduct.
  • It is vital that faculty and/or staff clearly document incidents of disruptive behavior so an accurate record may be maintained.Specifics of the event should be recorded in chronological order.Write it down, do not include psychological jargon or speculation.Do not editorialize—STICK TO THE FACTS OF THE INCIDENT/SITUATION.Stress the unacceptable conduct.
  • It is vital that faculty and/or staff clearly document incidents of disruptive behavior so an accurate record may be maintained.Specifics of the event should be recorded in chronological order.Write it down, do not include psychological jargon or speculation.Do not editorialize—STICK TO THE FACTS OF THE INCIDENT/SITUATION.Stress the unacceptable conduct.
  • It is vital that faculty and/or staff clearly document incidents of disruptive behavior so an accurate record may be maintained.Specifics of the event should be recorded in chronological order.Write it down, do not include psychological jargon or speculation.Do not editorialize—STICK TO THE FACTS OF THE INCIDENT/SITUATION.Stress the unacceptable conduct.
  • It is vital that faculty and/or staff clearly document incidents of disruptive behavior so an accurate record may be maintained.Specifics of the event should be recorded in chronological order.Write it down, do not include psychological jargon or speculation.Do not editorialize—STICK TO THE FACTS OF THE INCIDENT/SITUATION.Stress the unacceptable conduct.
  • It is vital that faculty and/or staff clearly document incidents of disruptive behavior so an accurate record may be maintained.Specifics of the event should be recorded in chronological order.Write it down, do not include psychological jargon or speculation.Do not editorialize—STICK TO THE FACTS OF THE INCIDENT/SITUATION.Stress the unacceptable conduct.
  • Being enrolled as a student at Mohave Community College carries with it obligations in regard to conduct, both in and out of the classroom.All student actions on campus should be free of conduct that interferes with the educational progress of any student, nor infringe upon the rights of other students as well as free any staff member from interference of from doing their job.
  • Being enrolled as a student at Mohave Community College carries with it obligations in regard to conduct, both in and out of the classroom.All student actions on campus should be free of conduct that interferes with the educational progress of any student, nor infringe upon the rights of other students as well as free any staff member from interference of from doing their job.
  • Being enrolled as a student at Mohave Community College carries with it obligations in regard to conduct, both in and out of the classroom.All student actions on campus should be free of conduct that interferes with the educational progress of any student, nor infringe upon the rights of other students as well as free any staff member from interference of from doing their job.
  • Being enrolled as a student at Mohave Community College carries with it obligations in regard to conduct, both in and out of the classroom.All student actions on campus should be free of conduct that interferes with the educational progress of any student, nor infringe upon the rights of other students as well as free any staff member from interference of from doing their job.
  • Being enrolled as a student at Mohave Community College carries with it obligations in regard to conduct, both in and out of the classroom.All student actions on campus should be free of conduct that interferes with the educational progress of any student, nor infringe upon the rights of other students as well as free any staff member from interference of from doing their job.
  • Instructors are responsible for guiding classroom discussion and for setting reasonable limits on the classroom time made available to students for teaching and learning. As faculty and staff of MCC, we have an obligation safe, secure instructional environment for students to succeed. The “learning environment of the college” is to be free of:Conduct that interferes with the educational progress.Acts of willful disobedience or defiance toward college personnel.Threats, intimidation, or acts of violence against other persons.The selling, consumption, or possession of alcoholic beverages or illegal drugs on any MCC property.Verbal abuse of a student or college employee.Assault, battery, or any other form of physical abuse of a student or college employee.Conduct that threatens the health and safety of another individual.Disorderly, lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct.Theft or damage to property of the college or another student.Unauthorized entry into, or use of, college facilities.Dishonesty, such as cheating, plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information.Forgery, falsification, alteration, or misuse of college documents, records, or identification.Smoking in classrooms or other unauthorized campus areas.Disruptive or improper use of cell phones and pagers in class.Behavioral Alert
  • Instructors are responsible for guiding classroom discussion and for setting reasonable limits on the classroom time made available to students for teaching and learning. As faculty and staff of MCC, we have an obligation safe, secure instructional environment for students to succeed. The “learning environment of the college” is to be free of:Conduct that interferes with the educational progress.Acts of willful disobedience or defiance toward college personnel.Threats, intimidation, or acts of violence against other persons.The selling, consumption, or possession of alcoholic beverages or illegal drugs on any MCC property.Verbal abuse of a student or college employee.Assault, battery, or any other form of physical abuse of a student or college employee.Conduct that threatens the health and safety of another individual.Disorderly, lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct.Theft or damage to property of the college or another student.Unauthorized entry into, or use of, college facilities.Dishonesty, such as cheating, plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information.Forgery, falsification, alteration, or misuse of college documents, records, or identification.Smoking in classrooms or other unauthorized campus areas.Disruptive or improper use of cell phones and pagers in class.Behavioral Alert

Transcript

  • 1. Teaching atMohave Community College Steve Sorden Academic Chair—Bullhead City Campus Office Phone: 928-704-9435 Cell Phone: 928-714-8314 Email: ssorden@mohave.edu
  • 2. PREVIEW OF TODAY’S SESSION• My Campus/Angel/Jics• Email, Curriculum Resources, Forms & Rosters• Course Packages/Outlines• Syllabus Development• College Catalog Review• Campus Support Services• The First Day• Learning Centered Instruction• Classroom Conduct• Roundtable/Discussion/Q & A
  • 3. MOHAVE COMMUNITY COLLEGE• YOU REPRESENT THE COLLEGE• YOU MAY BE THEIR ONLY CONNECTION!• YOU ARE PERCEIVED TO BE THE EXPERTTHE INSTRUCTOR IS THE PRIMARY CONTACT AND “FACE OF THE COLLEGE” IN THEEYES OF THE STUDENT!OUR REPUTATION AND IMAGE FOR THE COMMUNITY IS DRIVEN BY OUR STUDENTS’PERCEPTIONS AND REALITIES OF INSTRUCTION
  • 4. THE COLLEGE WEBSITE• My Campus – https://mycampus.mohave.edu/web/mycampus/home• Current Schedule/Course Catalog – http://www.mohave.edu/pages/244.asp• Current Academic Calendar – http://mohave.edu/info/calendars/Academic%20Calend ar.pdf – Look at Angel – https://angel.mohave.edu/• Jics – https://jics.mohave.edu/ics/
  • 5. THE COLLEGE WEBSITE, Cont’d• Employee Resources – Online Document (Forms) Repository: http://www.mohave.edu/pages/435.asp – Human Resources: http://www.mohave.edu/pages/168.asp – Curriculum Resources: http://www.mohave.edu/pages/438.asp – TSS Support: http://www.mohave.edu/pages/388.asp – Policies & Procedures Manual: http://www.mohave.edu/info/repository/P&P%20Manual.pdf – Email and Angel Access: http://mohave.edu/pages/1000.asp
  • 6. COURSE SYLLABUS• All information is on the “Curriculum Resources for Faculty” page on College Website! – Course Syllabus Template—designed for easy use – Course Packages/Outlines—required integration into syllabus• Syllabus must be comprehensive in regards to: – Instructor Contact Information – Required Text/Materials for the Course – Coherent Grading Policy—late procedures/missing class – Participation Policy – Assignments/Assessments for Rigorous Academic Standards – Cell Phone Use/Class Disruptions – College Policy/Procedures , especially Student Code of Conduct• Syllabus must be posted in Angel—college email is official contact for all students at MCC, not Angel contacts.• Syllabus is a legal contract with the student.
  • 7. POLICIES & PROCEDURES FOR FACULTY• Appearance• Timelines – WR1 Rosters – In Jics (email me if you don’t have any) – Add/Drop Period – FTSE Rosters – Grade Submissions – Grade Change – Class Cancellation – Student Success/Early Alert – Behavior Alert
  • 8. EXPECTATIONS OF FACULTYFor All Faculty:1. Focus on Student Needs and Expectations2. Be professional and courteous to all staff, students and administration at MCC!3. Communicate Problems/Situations4. Document, Document, Document!!!!5. Be Prepared!!!! Arrive on Time!!!6. Please do not let your classes go early.
  • 9. The First Day of ClassIntroduce the following items to your students:the name and number of the course, theobjectives of the course, the text(s), syllabus,the dates of all exams, and your gradingsystems. Finally take attendance to establishthat everyone there intends to be in your class.
  • 10. The First Day of Class• Plan an activity that allows students to get involved immediately. It may simply be an information-gathering exercise.• Share anecdotes. Students are interested in your background and some of your course-related experiences.
  • 11. The First Day of Class• Make certain you are early, at least 20 minutes before the start of the first class. If possible, greet your students as they come in the door.• Use an icebreaker. If possible, make it a question that is related to your course, but without a specific answer.• Take care of housekeeping items such as breaks and restroom locations.
  • 12. The First Day of Class• Conduct a class with real course content. It is important that students immediately understand that coming to class is a work situation with specific goals and purposes.• Some successful instructors begin their first class by asking students to write a short paragraph about themselves and their concerns. Often students are willing to discuss their anxieties. This will help in understanding the class.
  • 13. Characteristics of Good Teachers1. Being knowledgeable, and organized.2. Getting students actively involved in their learning.3. Helping students understand the course objectives and goals.4. Being a facilitator, not a director.5. Knowing the latest trends and technology.6. Stimulating discussion.7. Preparing professional materials and handouts.
  • 14. LEARNING-CENTERED COLLEGE • The teacher is a facilitator of learning. Students do not expect teachers to know all there is to know about the subject. They do expect, however, the teacher to facilitate learning the facts and skills of the course.
  • 15. LEARNING-CENTERED COLLEGE • Allow for individual differences. Every classroom will contain a diverse group of individuals. Allow for this by giving individual help, knowing students’ names, and being aware of differing backgrounds. • Vary teaching activities. Use different activities in the classroom. Try new ideas. Some recommend changing activities every 20 minutes.
  • 16. LEARNING-CENTERED COLLEGE • Develop a supportive climate. Students should understand that you are there to support them in the learning process, not to prove how tough the course is. • Be sensitive to barriers. Some of the baggage students bring with them include: Unsuccessful previous educational experience, time restraints, confusion concerning college (procedures) in general, failure to understand their academic limitations, stress, physical and mental handicaps.
  • 17. LEARNING-CENTERED COLLEGE • Be a learning partner. Communicate to the students that you’re are a partner in their learning. You will develop and work with them on strategy, materials, and projects that will allow them to self direct their learning experience. • Emphasize experimentation. Emphasize to the students that trying new learning techniques and making mistakes are often as valuable as reaching the right conclusion immediately.
  • 18. LEARNING-CENTERED COLLEGE • Use technology to enhance learning. Know about and be able to use the latest learning technologies. • Most of all it is important that you be understanding and considerate.
  • 19. Classroom Assessment Classroom Assessment techniques answer the questions: “what are students learning and how effectively am I teaching?”The minute paper :1. What is the most important thing you learned in today’s class?2. What is the most important thing the remains unanswered or leaves questions in your mind?
  • 20. Classroom AssessmentThe one-sentence summary :1. Who does what to whom, when, where, how, and why?The muddiest point: Asks the students to identify what they are not getting from the class or are not understanding.
  • 21. Teaching TechniquesInstructor-Based Techniques Student-Based Techniques• Lectures • Active Learning• Class Discussions • Collaborative Learning• Question/Answer Sessions• Demonstrations • Role Playing• Guest Lecturers • Student Panels • Oral Reports/Projects • Lab Assignments • Learning Cells
  • 22. CLASSROOM STRATEGIES FOR INSTRUCTIONClarify your expectations of student behavior, conduct,participation and rigorous academic standards from the verybeginning of the course.Set a tone of respect for differences of all Individuals in thelearning environment—ethical behavior and cultural awareness.Address any breech of conduct promptly, and set clearexpectations for student interactions/behavior.Hold students accountable for their work and behavior inaccordance with college policy and procedures in the StudentHandbook.Set a positive learning environment and mirror the behavior inyour interactions with students—be constructive, not destructive.
  • 23. PROCEDURES FOR REPORTINGDISRUPTIVE STUDENT BEHAVIORThe instructor shall report the action to the Academic Chair anddocument in a Behavior Alert Form—found in Forms Repository.All referrals for immediate intervention will be made to StudentServices to the appropriate Campus Academic Counselor.After the Behavior Alert has been filed, the Academic Counselor,Campus Dean, and Academic Chair will assess the student’sissues and respond with an appropriate intervention.Faculty will be notified of action and will need to participate inany subsequent meetings, hearings, etc., for the process.IF ACTION IS SEVERE ENOUGH WHERE YOU ARETHREATENED OR PERSONAL INJURY MAY OCCUR TOSOMEONE, CALL 911 IMMEDIATELY AND NOTIFY CAMPUSPERSONNEL!!!!!
  • 24. ROUND TABLE/DISCUSSION Questions & Answers
  • 25. BHC INSTRUCTIONAL TEAMSteve Sorden, BHC Academic Chair ssorden@mohave.eduKathy Cooper, Administrative Assistant kcooper@mohave.eduGerry Gyurkovitz, Instructional Technologist ggyurkovitz@mohave.eduKata ????, Lead Tutor—Title IIICathy Stubblefield—Disability Services cstubblefield@mohave.eduShawn Bristle, BHC Campus Dean sbristle@mohave.eduTodd Miller, Director of Student Services tmiller@mohave.edu
  • 26. Teaching atMohave Community College Steve Sorden Academic Chair—Bullhead City Campus Office Phone: 928-704-9435 Cell Phone: 928-714-8314 Email: ssorden@mohave.edu