Solar Ready Northwest Indiana
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Solar Ready Northwest Indiana

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South Shore Clean Cities (SSCC), in partnership with the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (NIRPC), presents the latest edition of its “Promoting Sustainability” webinar series ...

South Shore Clean Cities (SSCC), in partnership with the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission (NIRPC), presents the latest edition of its “Promoting Sustainability” webinar series “Solar Up Northwest Indiana.”

Representatives from Boston-based, Meister Consultants Group will be the guest presenters for the webinar. Anyone interested in clean energy, especially residential and commercial Photovoltaic, green builders, homeowners, solar installers and local government officials, is invited to attend this free webinar.

The webinar will cover: Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission’s Rooftop Solar Challenge II Grant: Purpose and Goals, Rooftop Solar 101 Benefits and Barriers, Solar Myth Busters and Best Practices. SSCC and NIRPC will be assembling a stakeholder advisory group for this project.

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Solar Ready Northwest Indiana Solar Ready Northwest Indiana Presentation Transcript

  • SOLAR READY NORTHWEST INDIANA Kathy Luther Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission February 28, 2014
  • U.S Department Of Energy SunShot Initiative Rooftop Solar Challenge
  • U.S Department of Energy SunShot Initiative •The U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national effort that aggressively drives innovation to make solar energy fully cost-competitive with traditional energy sources before the end of the decade. Through SunShot, DOE supports efforts by private companies, academia, and national laboratories to drive down the cost of solar electricity to $0.06 per kilowatt-hour.
  • U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative Rooftop Solar Challenge The U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative Rooftop Solar Challenge incentivizes regional awardee teams to make it easier and more affordable for Americans to go solar. By streamlining permit processes, updating planning and zoning codes, improving standards for connecting solar power to the electric grid, and increasing access to financing, teams will clear a path for rapid expansion of solar energy and serve as models for other communities across the nation.
  • Solar Ready II •Partnering with Mid-America Regional Council (MARC), National Association of Regional Councils (NARC), Meister Consultants Group (MCG), and Council of State Governments (CSG). •Goals are to implement solar best management practices, training materials and methods, and other proven implementation strategies previously established by MARC’s 2012 Solar Ready KC Initiative. •Ultimately will result in more streamlined and standardized solar practices, and will achieve measurable improvements in solar market conditions and access for ten million people across the US.
  • Goals of the Solar Ready II (SRII) Program 7 Reduce costs through regulatory reform Increase access to financing Promote solar adoption
  • Grant Details Major Goals Streamline the permitting process Update planning and zoning codes Reduce overall barriers to solar implementation Funding Amount $90,000 ($75,000 plus $15,000 if goals are met) Timeframe 18 to 30 months (depending on accomplishments met) 8
  • Grant Details National Partners •Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) •National Association of Regional Councils (NARC) •Meister Consultants Group •Council of State Governments 9
  • Grant Details Regional Participants •Central NewYork Regional Planning & Development Board (CNYRPDB) •DelawareValley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC) •Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) •Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (MWCOG) •North CentralTexas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) •Northwester Indiana Regional Planning Commission (NIRPC) •Ohio Kentucky Indiana Regional Council of Governments (OKI) •Southwestern Florida Regional Planning Commission (SWFRPC) •Tampa Bay Regional Planning Commission (TBRPC) 10
  • Major Deliverables and Milestones 11 Subtask Target Date Engage stakeholders including local government officials, planners, utility representatives, etc. February 2014 Evaluate existing processes/policies and update with Best Management Practices (BMPs) March - ongoing Submit Jurisdiction Questionnaires March 2014 and ongoing Engage 10-30 local governments as committed participants March 2014 and ongoing Provide qualitative and quantitative data from industry professionals to verify market maturity March 2014 and ongoing Assist MCG in gathering/compiling financial options data for the region March 2014 and ongoing OPTIONAL: Implement citizen engagement/market research panels July 2014 and ongoing
  • Kathy Luther Director of Environmental Programs NIRPC kluther@nirpc.org (219) 763-6060 x 127 www.nirpc.org/environment/solar Mia Colson National Contact National Association of Regional Councils Mia@narc.org (202) 986-1032, x218 www.narc.org/solarready Acknowledgment: This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Award Number DE-EE0006310 Disclaimer: This presentation was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United Sates Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. http://www.eere.energy.gov/solarchallenge/index.html
  • Benefits and Barriers to Solar Adoption inYour Region
  • Who Are We? 2 100 Consultants 7 offices worldwide U.S. HQ in Boston 15 years experience Using global best practices to inform local decisions
  • Meister Consultants Group chad.laurent@mc-group.com (617) 209 -1986 Chad Laurent Meister Consultants Group jayson.uppal@mc-group.com (617) 209 -1990 Jayson Uppal
  • Stakeholders Elected Officials Local Constituents Business & Industry Regional Utilities
  • Economic Growth Source: SEIA/GTM Research – 2009/2010/2011/2012Year in Review Report http://www.seia.org/research-resources/us-solar-market-insight 5 $0 $2,000,000,000 $4,000,000,000 $6,000,000,000 $8,000,000,000 $10,000,000,000 $12,000,000,000 $14,000,000,000 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
  • Job Creation Source: SEIA Estimates (2006-2009),The Solar Foundation’s National Solar Jobs Census 2010 (2010),The Solar Foundation’s National Solar Jobs Census 2012 (2011-2012). 6 0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000 160,000 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Solar Job Growth in the US SEIA Estimates The Solar Foundation
  • Job Creation Sources: Interstate Renewable Energy Council,The Solar Foundation, Meister Consultants Group 7 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 NumberofSolarJobs Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW) Correlation of Market Size & Jobs in Each State 90% Correlatio n
  • Price Stability Source: ISO New England, Inc. 8 0.00 20.00 40.00 60.00 80.00 100.00 120.00 140.00 160.00 180.00 Mar-03 Jul-03 Nov-03 Mar-04 Jul-04 Nov-04 Mar-05 Jul-05 Nov-05 Mar-06 Jul-06 Nov-06 Mar-07 Jul-07 Nov-07 Mar-08 Jul-08 Nov-08 Mar-09 Jul-09 Nov-09 Mar-10 Jul-10 Nov-10 Mar-11 Jul-11 Nov-11 Mar-12 Jul-12 Nov-12 Mar-13 Jul-13 Nov-13 $/MWh Date Historical Avg. Real-Time Wholesale Prices (Boston) .
  • Solar homes sold 20% faster and for 17% more than the equivalent non-solar homes in surveyed California subdivisions Smart Investment for Homes Source: http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy07osti/38304-01.pdf 9 From NREL:
  • Smart Investment for Business Source: Solar Energy Industries Association 0 20 40 60 80 100 Walmart Costco Kohl's Apple Ikea Macy's Johnson and Johnson McGraw Hill Staples Campbell's Soup U.S. Foods Bed Bath and Beyond Kaiser Permanente Volkswagen Walgreen's Target Safeway FedEx Intel L'Oreal General Motors Toys 'R' Us White Rose Foods Dow Jones and Co Solar Capacity (MW) Top 20 Companies by Solar Capacity 445 megawatts deployed as of August 2013 – enough to power 73,400 homes
  • Smart Investment for Gov’t Source: Borrego Solar 11
  •  Avoided Energy Purchases  Avoided T&D Line Losses  Avoided Capacity Purchases  Avoided T&D Investments  Fossil Fuel Price Impacts  Backup Power Valuable to Utilities 12
  • Valuable to Utilities Source: Renewable Energy World 2008 2012
  • QuantifiedValue Source: Clean Power Research http://mseia.net/site/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/MSEIA-Final- Benefits-of-Solar-Report-2012-11-01.pdf LevelizedValue of Solar ($/MWh) in PA and NJ
  • Installed Capacity: Solar Ready II Markets 15 13 States + DC 2.9 GW 38% of US Cap. 44% of Population
  • Installed Capacity: Solar Ready II Markets 16 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 InstalledCapacity(MW) Cumulative Installed Capacity (2011 - 2012) Cumulative Installed Capacity 2012 Cumulative Installed Capcaity 2011
  • Global Installed Capacity Source: REN 21 Top 5 Countries Solar Operating Capacity (2012) Germany Italy USA China Japan Rest of World Germany 32 % USA 7.2%
  • Global Installed Capacity per Capita Source: REN 21,World Bank, Interstate Renewable Energy Council 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 WattsperCapita 400Watts Per Person 23Watts Per Person 0.67Watts Per Person
  • Myth: It’s not sunny enough where I live Source: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 19
  • Regional Workshop Surveys Q: What is the greatest barrier to solar adoption in your community?
  • Survey Results: Barriers 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 High Upfront Cost & Low ROI Lack of Information & Education Unfriendly Policy Environment & Lack of Incentives Local Zoning & Permitting Utility Support Aesthetics & Historic Preservation Lack of Support from HOAs Reliability Concerns Environmental Impact Other
  • The Cost of Solar PV Tracking the SunVI:The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the US from 1998-2012 (LBNL), GTM 22 $0 $2 $4 $6 $8 $10 $12 $14 1998 2012 CostperWatt US Average Installed Cost for Behind-the-Meter Residential PV 36% drop in price 2010 - 2013
  • The Cost of Solar in the US Source: Solar Electric Power Association CostofElectricity Time Solar Price Retail Price Wholesale Price Stage 1 Today Stage 2 Stage 3
  • Subsidies and Support Source: Management Information Services, Inc. October 2011. 60Years of Energy Incentives:Analysis of Federal Expenditures for Energy Development; SEIA, May 1, 2012. Federal Energy Incentives Report. 24 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Solar Nuclear Coal Natural Gas Oil Value of Subsidies and Support ($ billions) Subsidies for Conventional and Solar Energy, 1950-2010 $104 Billion $73 Billion $17 Billion $369 Billion $121 Billion
  • The Cost of Solar in the US Source: NREL (http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy14osti/60412.pdf) LBNL (http://emp.lbl.gov/sites/all/files/lbnl-6350e.pdf)(http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/pdfs/sunshot_webinar_20130226.pdf ) $- $1.00 $2.00 $3.00 $4.00 $5.00 $6.00 US Solar Cost German Solar Cost $perWatt Comparison of US and German Solar Costs Non-Hardware Cost Total Installed Cost
  • The Cost of Solar in the US Source: NREL (http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy14osti/60412.pdf) LBNL (http://emp.lbl.gov/sites/all/files/lbnl-6350e.pdf)(http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/pdfs/sunshot_webinar_20130226.pdf ) $- $1.00 $2.00 $3.00 $4.00 $5.00 $6.00 US Solar Cost German Solar Cost $perWatt Comparison of US and German Solar Costs Non-Hardware Cost Hardware Cost
  • The Cost of Solar in the US $- $1.00 $2.00 $3.00 $4.00 $5.00 $6.00 US Solar Cost German Solar Cost $perWatt Comparison of US and German Solar Costs Non-Hardware Cost Hardware Cost Source: NREL (http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy14osti/60412.pdf) LBNL (http://emp.lbl.gov/sites/all/files/lbnl-6350e.pdf)(http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/pdfs/sunshot_webinar_20130226.pdf )
  • $- $1.00 $2.00 $3.00 $4.00 $5.00 $6.00 US Solar Cost German Solar Cost $perWatt Comparison of US and German Solar Costs Column1 Non-Hardware Cost Hardware Cost The Cost of Solar in the US Profits,Taxes, & Overhead Source: NREL (http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy14osti/60412.pdf) LBNL (http://emp.lbl.gov/sites/all/files/lbnl-6350e.pdf)(http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/pdfs/sunshot_webinar_20130226.pdf )
  • $- $1.00 $2.00 $3.00 $4.00 $5.00 $6.00 US Solar Cost German Solar Cost $perWatt Comparison of US and German Solar Costs Column1 Non-Hardware Cost Hardware Cost The Cost of Solar in the US $0.00 $0.20 $0.40 $0.60 $0.80 $1.00 $1.20 $1.40 $1.60 $perWatt Other Paperwork Permitting & Inspection Financing Costs Customer Acquisition Installation Labor Solar Soft Costs Source: NREL (http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy14osti/60412.pdf) LBNL (http://emp.lbl.gov/sites/all/files/lbnl-6350e.pdf)(http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/pdfs/sunshot_webinar_20130226.pdf )
  • Challenge: Installation Time Photon Magazine 8 days from inception to completion Germany Today NewYork City’s Goal 100 daysfrom inception to completion
  • 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 US Germany Hours AverageTime to Permit a Solar Installation Time to Installation Source: NREL, LBNL 7.2x more man-hours needed in the US
  • Permitting Costs Source: NREL, LBNL $- $0.05 $0.10 $0.15 $0.20 $0.25 US Germany CostperWatt Average Cost of Permitting in the US and Germany 21x the cost for permitting in the US
  • Consistency and Transparency through Standardized Processes Germany’s Success
  • The Cost of Solar in the US $- $1.00 $2.00 $3.00 $4.00 $5.00 $6.00 $7.00 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 2020 $/watt Change in Soft Costs and Hardware Costs OverTime Soft Costs Hardware Costs $3.32 $3.32 $3.28 $1.90 No change in soft costs between 2010 and 2012
  • Enable local governments to replicate successful solar practices to reduce soft costs and expand local adoption of solar energy Program Goal
  • Solar Ready Roadmap 36 Planning Zoning Code Improvements Enable Solar Access Building Code Improvements Process Permitting Process Improvements Permit Fees Prequalify Installers Financing & Solar Adoption Distribute Cost Survey to Installers Engage Local Lenders Enact a Solarize Program Step 1 Step 2 Step 3