Sci c un3clssfctnmttr
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Sci c un3clssfctnmttr

on

  • 1,101 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,101
Views on SlideShare
1,101
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
29
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • http://www.chem1.com/acad/webtext/pre/chemsci.html
  • Graphite image: geology.about.com/.../bl/images/blgraphite.htm
  • http://www.friedlandindustries.com/images/new/NonferrousMetalsCopper.jpg
  • http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/matter/slides/sld003.htm
  • “ Elements, Compounds, and Mixtures”   Description : This slide shows the molecular composition of an element, a compound, and two mixtures.   Basic Concepts All samples of a substance have the same molecular composition and intensive properties and are homogeneous. Elements and compounds are substances; mixtures are not. The elements making up a compound combine in fixed ratios. Mixtures can be separated by physical methods. Mixtures that have a uniform composition throughout are homogeneous; those that have parts with different compositions are heterogeneous.   Teaching Suggestions Use this transparency to help students visualize the molecular composition of elements, compounds, and mixtures and to review the definitions of these terms. Make sure students understand the difference between the terms matter and substance . Remind students that elements and compounds are always homogeneous, while mixtures can be either homogeneous or heterogeneous.   Questions : Which of the bottles pictured above contain(s) matter? Which contain(s) a single substance? Explain your answers. How many elements are present in each molecule of water shown in bottle (b)? What is the relative number of atoms of each element in a water molecule? As you know, ice is frozen water. In other words, ice and water are the same substance, in different phases. What would you expect the ratio of hydrogen atoms to oxygen atoms to be in a molecule of ice? Explain your reasoning. Bottle (c) and bottle (d) both contain mixtures. How are these mixtures similar? How are they different? Suppose you find an unlabeled bottle containing a clear liquid. Can you tell by looking at it whether the material is a compound or a mixture? Explain your answer. How can you prove that a sample of sea water is a mixture? Classify the following items as elements, compounds or mixtures; rice pudding, copper, carbon dioxide, air, milk, magnesium chloride, granite, mercury, and maple syrup. A chocolate-chip cookie with more chips in one part of the cookie than another can be used to demonstrate a heterogeneous mixture. Name two other materials that can be classified as heterogeneous mixtures. Explain your reasoning.  
  • “ Elements, Compounds, and Mixtures”   Description : This slide shows the molecular composition of an element, a compound, and two mixtures.   Basic Concepts All samples of a substance have the same molecular composition and intensive properties and are homogeneous. Elements and compounds are substances; mixtures are not. The elements making up a compound combine in fixed ratios. Mixtures can be separated by physical methods. Mixtures that have a uniform composition throughout are homogeneous; those that have parts with different compositions are heterogeneous.   Teaching Suggestions Use this transparency to help students visualize the molecular composition of elements, compounds, and mixtures and to review the definitions of these terms. Make sure students understand the difference between the terms matter and substance . Remind students that elements and compounds are always homogeneous, while mixtures can be either homogeneous or heterogeneous.   Questions : Which of the bottles pictured above contain(s) matter? Which contain(s) a single substance? Explain your answers. How many elements are present in each molecule of water shown in bottle (b)? What is the relative number of atoms of each element in a water molecule? As you know, ice is frozen water. In other words, ice and water are the same substance, in different phases. What would you expect the ratio of hydrogen atoms to oxygen atoms to be in a molecule of ice? Explain your reasoning. Bottle (c) and bottle (d) both contain mixtures. How are these mixtures similar? How are they different? Suppose you find an unlabeled bottle containing a clear liquid. Can you tell by looking at it whether the material is a compound or a mixture? Explain your answer. How can you prove that a sample of sea water is a mixture? Classify the following items as elements, compounds or mixtures; rice pudding, copper, carbon dioxide, air, milk, magnesium chloride, granite, mercury, and maple syrup. A chocolate-chip cookie with more chips in one part of the cookie than another can be used to demonstrate a heterogeneous mixture. Name two other materials that can be classified as heterogeneous mixtures. Explain your reasoning.  
  • Compounds have different properties than the elements they are made from. In a mixture, the mixture retains the properties of the materials it is made from. A chemical formula can always be written for a compound.

Sci c un3clssfctnmttr Sci c un3clssfctnmttr Presentation Transcript

  • MATTER Can it be physically separated? Homogeneous Mixture (solution) Heterogeneous Mixture Compound Element MIXTURE PURE SUBSTANCE yes no Can it be chemically decomposed? noyesIs the composition uniform? noyes Courtesy Christy Johannesson www.nisd.net/communicationsarts/pages/chem
  • Elements only one kind of atom; atoms are bonded it the element is diatomic or polyatomic Compounds two or more kinds of atoms that are bonded substance with definite makeup and properties Mixtures two or more substances that are physically mixed two or more kinds of and Both elements and compounds have a definite makeup and definite properties. Packard, Jacobs, Marshall, Chemistry Pearson AGS Globe, page (Figure 2.4.1)
  • Matter Flowchart Examples: – graphite – pepper – sugar (sucrose) – paint – soda Courtesy Christy Johannesson www.nisd.net/communicationsarts/pages/chem element hetero. mixture compound solution homo. mixture hetero. mixture
  • Pure Substances Element – composed of identical atoms – EX: copper wire, aluminum foil Courtesy Christy Johannesson www.nisd.net/communicationsarts/pages/chem
  • Pure Substances Compound – composed of 2 or more elements in a fixed ratio – properties differ from those of individual elements – EX: table salt (NaCl) Courtesy Christy Johannesson www.nisd.net/communicationsarts/pages/chem
  • Pure Substances For example… Two different compounds, each has a definite composition. Carbon, C Oxygen, O Carbon monoxide, CO Carbon, C Oxygen, O Oxygen, O Carbon dioxide, CO2 Courtesy Christy Johannesson www.nisd.net/communicationsarts/pages/chem
  • Mixtures Variable combination of two or more pure substances. Heterogeneous Homogeneous Courtesy Christy Johannesson www.nisd.net/communicationsarts/pages/chem
  • Mixtures Solution – homogeneous – very small particles – no Tyndall effect Tyndall Effect – particles don’t settle – EX: rubbing alcohol Courtesy Christy Johannesson www.nisd.net/communicationsarts/pages/chem
  • Mixtures Colloid – heterogeneous – medium-sized particles – Tyndall effect – particles don’t settle – EX: milk Courtesy Christy Johannesson www.nisd.net/communicationsarts/pages/chem
  • Mixtures Suspension – heterogeneous – large particles – Tyndall effect – particles settle – EX: fresh-squeezed lemonade Courtesy Christy Johannesson www.nisd.net/communicationsarts/pages/chem
  • Mixtures Examples: – mayonnaise – muddy water – fog – saltwater – Italian salad dressing Courtesy Christy Johannesson www.nisd.net/communicationsarts/pages/chem colloid suspension colloid solution suspension
  • Classification of Matter uniform properties? fixed composition? chemically decomposable? no no no yes hetero- geneous mixture solution element compound http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/matter/slides/sld003.htm
  • Elements, Compounds, and Mixtures (a) an element (hydrogen) (b) a compound (water) (c) a mixture (hydrogen and oxygen) (d) a mixture (hydrogen and oxygen) Dorin, Demmin, Gabel, Chemistry The Study of Matter , 3rd Edition, 1990, page 68 hydrogen atoms hydrogen atoms oxygen atoms
  • Elements, Compounds, and Mixtures (a) an element (hydrogen) (b) a compound (water) (c) a mixture (hydrogen and oxygen) (d) a mixture (hydrogen and oxygen) Dorin, Demmin, Gabel, Chemistry The Study of Matter , 3rd Edition, 1990, page 68 hydrogen atoms hydrogen atoms oxygen atoms
  • Mixture vs. Compound Mixture Fixed Composition Bonds between components Can ONLY be separated by chemical means Variable Composition No bonds between components Can be separated by physical means Alike Different Contain two or more elements Can be separated into elements Involve substances Compound Different Topic Topic