Metalic bonding
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Metalic bonding

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  • In a metallic bond, the metal atoms have excess valence electrons and are trying to get rid of them to achieve a stable octet. <br /> An analogy is playing &apos;hot potato&apos; - no atom wants to extra electrons and they are free to &apos;float&apos; around. <br />
  • In an ionic crystal, the ions are lined up as to have negative charge surrounding positive charge and vice versa. The ions are locked in a rigid lattice structure or crystalline arrangement. When a force is applied, the ions shift, and repel each other when like charges are next to each other. The electrostatic forces of repulsion cause the ionic crystal to split or fracture (cleavage). <br />

Metalic bonding Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Metallic Bonding
  • 2. Metallic Bonding Metallic bonding is the attraction between positive ions and surrounding freely mobile electrons. Most metals contribute more than one mobile electron per atom. “electron sea” e1- e1- e1- e1- e1- e1- e1- e1- e1- e1- e1- e1- e1- e1- e1- e1- Free electrons + + + + + ++ + + + + + + + Cations Bailar, Jr, Moeller, Kleinberg, Guss, Castellion, Metz, Chemistry, 1984, page 245
  • 3. Shattering an Ionic Crystal; Bending a Metal Bailar, Jr, Moeller, Kleinberg, Guss, Castellion, Metz, Chemistry, 1984, page 248 + + ++ + ++ +++ + + + + + + + ++ + ++ +++ + + + + + ++ + + + ++ + + + + + + + + ++ + + + + + ++ + ++ +++ + + + + + + + ++ + ++ +++ + + + + + ++ + + + ++ + + + + + + + + ++ + + + +- + -- - + + - -+ - ++- + - - + + -+-- - -++ - + + - + - -+ + - +- + -- - + + - -+ - ++- + - - + + -+-- - -++ - + + - + - -+ + - An ionic crystal A metal No electrostatic forces of repulsion – metal is deformed (malleable) Electrostatic forces of repulsion Force Force broken crystal
  • 4. Shattering an Ionic Crystal; Bending a Metal Bailar, Jr, Moeller, Kleinberg, Guss, Castellion, Metz, Chemistry, 1984, page 248 + + ++ + ++ +++ + + + + + + + ++ + ++ +++ + + + + + ++ + + + ++ + + + + + + + + ++ + + + + + ++ + ++ +++ + + + + + + + ++ + ++ +++ + + + + + ++ + + + ++ + + + + + + + + ++ + + + +- + -- - + + - -+ - ++- + - - + + -+-- - -++ - + + - + - -+ + - +- + -- - + + - -+ - ++- + - - + + -+-- - -++ - + + - + - -+ + - An ionic crystal A metal No electrostatic forces of repulsion – metal is deformed (malleable) Electrostatic forces of repulsion Force Force broken crystal