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3223 nov8

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Presentation for a 3000-level grammar class. Based on Chapter 10 of Martha Kolln's Rhetorical Grammar, 6ht edition.

Presentation for a 3000-level grammar class. Based on Chapter 10 of Martha Kolln's Rhetorical Grammar, 6ht edition.

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3223 nov8 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Choosing Nominals CHAPTER 10
  • 2. What’s a Nominal?
    • Structures that act like a noun phrase:
  • 3. APPOSITIVES
  • 4. Appositives
    • Noun phrases that rename a subject nominal, right before or after it
    • Not the same as adjectives since they don’t just describe; they can replace
    • Look at the examples on p. 191.
  • 5. Commas & Appositives
    • Rules are similar to the ones for adjectivals:
      • restrictive info = no comma
      • nonrestrictive info = comma
    • Let’s discuss #2 on p.193 and 194.
  • 6. Colons & Appositives
    • A colon (or a dash) can introduce appositives with dramatic emphasis
    • We saw the test: a fifty-question
      • essay exam.
    • List of appositives? See p. 195.
  • 7. Sentence Appositives
    • Noun phrases, usually after a dash, that rename an entire sentence (kind of like a broad-reference clause)
    • The test had 50 essay questions to
    • be answered in 50 minutes—a
    • daunting task.
  • 8. NOMINAL VERB PHRASES
  • 9. Gerunds
    • -ing verbs that act as nominals: subjects, objects, complements, etc.
    • See p. 198 for examples
  • 10. Gerunds & Subjects
    • When a gerund phrase includes a singular subject, it’s possessive
    • I can’t believe my failing the
    • math class.
  • 11. NOMINAL CLAUSES
  • 12. The Nominalizer
    • “ That” clauses
    • I can’t believe
    that the paper is due so soon.
  • 13. Other Uses of Nominals
    • Turn a direct quote into indirect discourse (see p.202)
    • Complete an interrogative question with who, why, which
  • 14. Delayed Subjects
    • Start with an anticipatory “it” : it has been…it was…
    • After a verb , put in a nominalizer : It has been found that short study sessions work .
  • 15. RECAP, Chs. 8-10
    • Adverbials = structures that modify verbs
    • Adjectivals = structures that modify nouns
    • Nominals = structures that replace nouns