Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Active Learning
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Active Learning

346

Published on

DISCUSSION TOPIC: How Can Active Learning Become More Widespread in Engineering Education? …

DISCUSSION TOPIC: How Can Active Learning Become More Widespread in Engineering Education?

The following slides relate to (1) a set of active-learning exercises used in a course in fluid mechanics and (2) how active-learning techniques developed by one faculty member were able to be used by another. Slides from a presentation associated with ASEE Paper AC-2008-207.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
346
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. <ul><li>DISCUSSION TOPIC: How Can Active Learning Become More Widespread in Engineering Education? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the obstacles for faculty? </li></ul><ul><li>How can these obstacles be overcome? </li></ul><ul><li>Other Issues? </li></ul><ul><li>The following slides relate to (1) a set of active-learning exercises used in a course in fluid mechanics and (2) how active-learning techniques developed by one faculty member were able to be used by another. Slides from a presentation associated with ASEE Paper AC-2008-207. </li></ul><ul><li>Stephen R. Turns </li></ul><ul><li>Penn State University </li></ul>
  • 2. ACTIVE AND COLLABORATIVE LEARNING EXERCIES FOR A FIRST COURSE IN FLUID MECHANICS AC 2008-207 Stephen R. Turns, Laura L. Pauley, and Sarah E. Zappe PENN S TATE 2008 ASEE Annual Conference &amp; Exposition June 22-25, 2008
  • 3. WELCOME TO ME 320! FLUID DYNAMICS
  • 4. ABOUT ACTIVE AND COOPERATIVE LEARNING Richard Felder says: “ In the traditional approach to college teaching, most class time is spent with the professor lecturing and the students watching and listening. The students work individually on assignments, and cooperation is discouraged.
  • 5. ACTIVE AND COOPERATIVE LEARNING - Continued Such teacher-centered instructional methods have repeatedly been found inferior to instruction that involves active learning , in which students solve problems, answer questions, formulate questions of their own, discuss, explain, debate, or brainstorm during class, and cooperative learning , in which students work in teams on problems and projects under conditions that assure both positive interdependence and individual accountability.”
  • 6. Research by Prince &amp; others shows that active learning is superior to the traditional approach in the following measures: <ul><li>Short-term retention of subject matter </li></ul><ul><li>Long-term retention of subject matter </li></ul><ul><li>Conceptual understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Positive student attitudes </li></ul><ul><li>Motivation for further study </li></ul>
  • 7. Improved educational outcomes associated with collaborative learning over individual or competitive learning include the following: <ul><li>Academic achievement </li></ul><ul><li>Quality of interpersonal interactions </li></ul><ul><li>Self esteem </li></ul><ul><li>Student activities </li></ul><ul><li>Retention in academic programs </li></ul>
  • 8. Example of a 30-Second In-Class Exercise: <ul><li>Educational Objectives: </li></ul><ul><li>To facilitate long-term retention of the fact that the appropriate differential area dA for integrating over the cross-sectional are for pipe flow is 2 π rdr . </li></ul><ul><li>To help students become confident in working in cylindrical coordinate systems. </li></ul>Differential Area dA for Cylindrical Systems
  • 9. Given by instructor: The mass flow rate through a pipe having a circular cross section is <ul><li>Students are requested to: </li></ul><ul><li>Sketch what might be an appropriate dA for this situation </li></ul><ul><li>Write an algebraic expression for this differential area involving the radial coordinate r </li></ul><ul><li>What follows: </li></ul><ul><li>Students think, sketch, and write </li></ul><ul><li>Instructor asks for volunteers to give their answers and explain their reasoning </li></ul>
  • 10. Wrap-Up: <ul><li>Comments: </li></ul><ul><li>This concept is used (and revisited) many times throughout the course. </li></ul><ul><li>Nearly all students in a class of 80 were able to recall and use the expression dA = 2 π rdr in subsequent quizzes and exams. </li></ul>
  • 11. Example of a 20-30 Minute In-Class Exercise: <ul><li>Educational Objectives: </li></ul><ul><li>To help students understand &amp; internalize the principle of mass conservation. </li></ul><ul><li>To have students develop confidence in their analytic capabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>To have students discover how ordinary differential equations arise in the context of unsteady mass-conservation problems. </li></ul>Unsteady Flow from One Tank to Another
  • 12. From the instructor: Students are given a handout with this information: v 1 = [0.95 gh 1 ( t )] 1/2 v 2 = [0.95 gh 2 ( t )] 1/2
  • 13. <ul><li>Students are requested to: </li></ul><ul><li>Work in groups of 3 persons </li></ul><ul><li>Develop an expression for h 1 (t) </li></ul><ul><li>Develop an expression for h 2 (t) </li></ul><ul><li>Develop an expression for the time to empty both tanks </li></ul>
  • 14. <ul><li>What follows: </li></ul><ul><li>Students think, sketch, write, discuss, ask questions, are engaged, are animated. </li></ul><ul><li>Students achieve various degrees of completion. </li></ul><ul><li>The class is brought together with the instructor asking students about their approach as the instructor quickly develops the solution. </li></ul>
  • 15. Table 1. Class Time Required for the Exercises
  • 16. Table 2. Specific Nature of the Exercises
  • 17. Table 3. Specific Topics Treated by the Exercises
  • 18. Table 3. Continued
  • 19. Table 4. Student Collaboration
  • 20. These exercises can readily used and/or adapted by other instructors – LLP experience: Concerns How do I add active learning? What are the mechanics? Will I lose control of the class? Will students stay on task? Outcomes Ability to gage students understanding Greatly enhanced student participation Additional preparation time minimal (maybe zero)
  • 21. Assessment Rate the effectiveness of the in-class, active-learning exercises to the overall learning experience in this class. 1 = Lowest rating 7 = Highest rating Rating ≤ 2 3 4 5 6 7 Fall 2007 0% 3% 12% 19% 44% 22% ( N = 73) Fall 2006 0% 13% 7% 7% 27% 47% ( N = 15)
  • 22. Assessment - Continued Comparison of Final Examination Scores with and without Active Learning Treatment Average Score Std. Dev. t -Test ( p -value) Without 78.94 11.92 -2.228 (0.024, df = 109) With 83.87 10.75
  • 23. We found that the active-learning exercises <ul><li>Can be readily used as is or easily adapted by other instructors. </li></ul><ul><li>Were rated by a majority of students to be highly effective in their learning of fluid mechanics. </li></ul><ul><li>Appear to improve students performance on final examinations. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide stimulating learning and teaching environments for both the students and the instructor. </li></ul>
  • 24. Photo Credits Slide 2: (a) NASA, (b) NOAA, (c) General Electric Slides 4 &amp; 5: PSU-LV Learning Center (c) 2005 Theo Anderson

×