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Writing an eye catching resume
 

Writing an eye catching resume

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  • Anywhere from five to 15 seconds. The interview then determines how you will do the job by assessing your performance. Basically, the resume gets you the interview, and the interview gets you the job.
  • Explain the difference between a “profile” and an “objective.”
  • A great way to get ideas for your resume is by looking at job posting/descriptions. Let’s look at several job posting examples. Find a bunch of organizations that you would like to intern at. Check out their websites—looking especially at the different departments or issues/topics/causes they cover. You might also want to look at the job opportunities on the site to get a sense of the organization’s style, etc.
  • Example: political science major with knowledge of Eastern European issues. If you apply to intern at a think tank, then that will gain the HR person’s attention.
  • I would only list projects and/or course work if its relevant or interesting. And, if it’s on your resume, be sure that you know your project well enough to talk about it.
  • The keep word to remember as you write your bullet is “how.” HOW did you accomplish your task and part of that will be—what were the results.
  • Responsible for supervising software engineers.” “ Transcribed research data.” “ Excellent written communication skills.” “ Helped develop a brand identity for NPR’s jazz programs.” What do these four sentences have in common? All can easily be mistaken for information in a job description or duties that you would be required to perform on the job. These things read, “Here are the tasks/responsibilities required in this job.” It doesn’t say, “Here are all my achievements.” So, all the correct resume bullets had one thing in common: they demonstrated tangible and measurable achievements. Another way to think about it is try to distinguish your duties from your skills. Duties are the activities you perform on the job: generating reports, helping coordinate an industry conference, providing desk support. Skill are the tools and techniques you use to accomplish these tasks: knowledge of certain software, comm. abilities, leadership skills. Before compiling your resume, write down all of your previous duties. Then list the skills and abilities that were necessary to accomplish each task.
  • - doesn’t give the reader an idea of exactly what you’re referring to.
  • Think of this section of your resume as the courses, opportunities, etc., that you’ve completed on your own time to either enhance your work skills or things that interest you. To me, I look at this and think to myself that the person is motivated to do stuff outside of work to educate/improve him/herself.
  • Technology Skills: Formal training in: HTML, ASP, JavaScript, SQL, Dreamweaver, Flash and Photoshop; proficient in all Microsoft Office programs, advanced training courses in PowerPoint and Excel
  • Coursework—if you worked on a group project, etc., that’s relevant to a particular field, put it on your resume. Part-time jobs—working at the Gap or at The Olive Garden may not seem like the kind of experience employers are looking for but your part-time gig taught you some important skills that can translate to any workplace. You learned how to diplomatically handle all sorts of people—even difficult ones. Plus working through school shows dedication and impressive time-management ability. Campus leadership positions—it’s impressive to be a dorm president or RA. Show how this position made an impact on the organization/school. Clubs, etc.—If you are a varsity athlete, then you probably have leadership skills, teamwork and some serious time-management—all things employers consider to be important. Volunteer work—this really counts as relevant experience.
  • Address the letter using an honorific (Mr., Ms., etc.) and a specific individual. Don’t do the typical – To Whom This May Concern; Dear Sir or Madam, but try Dear Human Resources Director. Specify the position you’re applying for or state the reason you’re contacting that organization. If you don’t know the person’s name, call the organization and ask the receptionist for the HR Director’s name.
  • Hit a positive balance between features and benefits. Features are the specifics you bring to the job: experience, education, training, awards, skills, abilities, etc. Benefits allows you to emphasize what your features mean to the employer. For example: “ I have the five years of hands-on experience you’ve identified as critical, which means I’ll be productive from the moment I begin working with you.” The first half of this statement presents features (experience, education), while the second half emphasizes the payoff for the employer (productive from the start). The point is close the gap between the skills and abilities you offer and what that means for the employer. Hit a positive balance between features and benefits. Features are the specifics you bring to the job: experience, education, training, awards, skills, abilities, etc. Benefits allows you to emphasize what your features mean to the employer. For example: “ I have the five years of hands-on experience you’ve identified as critical, which means I’ll be productive from the moment I begin working with you.” The first half of this statement presents features (experience, education), while the second half emphasizes the payoff for the employer (productive from the start). The point is close the gap between the skills and abilities you offer and what that means for the employer.
  • Construct a strong, positive closing paragraph that includes a summary remark, follow up information and some statement of appreciation. Example:
  • Also, remember to clearly label the “subject” line in your e-mail.
  • Sidebar: I recently read a very interesting article on what employers want in their employees. Research shows that half of hiring managers take a certain qualification into account when making hiring and promotion decisions. What is it? A person’s writing ability. No matter what your field or position, your ability to communicate using the written word plays a major role in career success. Many hiring managers cite typos and grammatical mistakes as the most common resume errors. There’s an organization called the National Commission on Writing that says that two-third of salaried employees in American companies have some writing responsibility. It doesn’t matter what level in the company.
  • So, that means, no: denim shorts, short skirts, halter, strapless or tank tops, flip flops, workout attire, beachwear, midriff-bearing clothes, or concerts t-shirts or shirts with offensive slogans or logos.
  • I would say that you should just be comfortable with the following to have a successful first “interview”: yourself; the industry; and the employers. Be sure to send a thank you note ASAP. That will differentiate you from others. Make it simple and brief and indicate that you are interested in the position.

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