This presentation is not about RefWorks<br />Connecting your research to the scholarly literature<br />Created by Stephani...
Why do you conduct research?<br />What is the purpose of a literature review?<br />How would you answer these questions?<b...
Construct efficient searches using thesaurus terms<br />Connect your research topic to the literature (work of other resea...
How To Vote via Texting<br />EXAMPLE<br />Standard texting rates only (worst case US $0.20)<br />We have no access to your...
Poll #1: Conducting Research<br />Don’t forget: You can copy-paste this slide into other presentations, and move or resize...
A thesaurus is a controlled vocabulary or list of terms used to describe the concepts addressed in an article.  <br />You ...
Poll #2: Conducting Research<br />Don’t forget: You can copy-paste this slide into other presentations, and move or resize...
Read the articles you find in batches.<br />Identify how the articles address your themes.  “Discard” those that don’t.<br...
Kamman, M. L., & Long, S. K. (2010). One district's approach to the induction of special <br />	education teachers. Journa...
Cole, M. (2009). Critical Race Theory and education: A <br />	Marxist response. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. <br />How wo...
Darling-Hammond, L. (2009). President Obama and education: The 	possibility for dramatic improvements in teaching and lear...
Use Web of Science to see who has cited the article you are reading by conducting a Cited Reference Search.<br />If your a...
Use specialized encyclopedias, such as those in Gale Virtual Reference Library, to learn more about theorists or theories....
How do you know when you have found everything on your topic?<br />What does it mean when your professor says there is a “...
Look through the articles you have already read.  How have those authors supported their work?  What theories did they use...
Why are you conducting research?<br />How do you engage or learn from the work other scholars have done before you?<br />H...
Education – Pre K–12 Educational Leadership<br />http://www.library.fullerton.edu/guides/edleadpk12/home.php<br />Educatio...
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This presentation is not about RefWorks

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This is a slideshow of the presentation given in January of 2011 to EdD students at CSUF.

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  • This slide is for display to the audience to show them how they will vote on your polls in your presentation. You can remove this slide if you like or if the audience is already comfortable with texting and/or voting with Poll Everywhere.Sample Oral Instructions:Ladies and gentlemen, throughout today’s meeting we’re going to engage in some audience polling to find out what you’re thinking, what you’re up to and what you know. Now I’m going to ask for your opinion. We’re going to use your phones to do some audience voting just like on American Idol.So please take out your cell phones, but remember to leave them on silent. You can participate by sending a text message.This is a just standard rate text message, so it may be free for you, or up to twenty cents on some carriers if you do not have a text messaging plan. The service we are using is serious about privacy. I cannot see your phone numbers, and you’ll never receive follow-up text messages outside this presentation. There’s only one thing worse than email spam – and that’s text message spam because you have to pay to receive it!
  • Press F5 or enter presentation mode to view the poll\r\nIn an emergency during your presentation, if the poll isn&apos;t showing, navigate to this link in your web browser:\r\nhttp://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/LTQzMDc3OTYzMwIf you like, you can use this slide as a template for your own voting slides. You might use a slide like this if you feel your audience would benefit from the picture showing a text message on a phone.
  • Press F5 or enter presentation mode to view the poll\r\nIn an emergency during your presentation, if the poll isn&apos;t showing, navigate to this link in your web browser:\r\nhttp://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/MTg5NTM2OTQ3MgIf you like, you can use this slide as a template for your own voting slides. You might use a slide like this if you feel your audience would benefit from the picture showing a text message on a phone.
  • This presentation is not about RefWorks

    1. 1. This presentation is not about RefWorks<br />Connecting your research to the scholarly literature<br />Created by Stephanie Rosenblatt, Winter 2011<br />
    2. 2. Why do you conduct research?<br />What is the purpose of a literature review?<br />How would you answer these questions?<br />
    3. 3. Construct efficient searches using thesaurus terms<br />Connect your research topic to the literature (work of other researchers)<br />Identify key researchers and/or theorists working in your field<br />Workshop Goals<br />
    4. 4. How To Vote via Texting<br />EXAMPLE<br />Standard texting rates only (worst case US $0.20)<br />We have no access to your phone number<br />Capitalization doesn’t matter, but spaces and spelling do<br />TIPS<br />
    5. 5. Poll #1: Conducting Research<br />Don’t forget: You can copy-paste this slide into other presentations, and move or resize the poll.<br />
    6. 6. A thesaurus is a controlled vocabulary or list of terms used to describe the concepts addressed in an article. <br />You are often able to find more information relating to your topic if you use the thesaurus term instead of conducting a simple keyword search.<br />Every database has its own unique set of terms, but they are listed in the thesaurus.<br />Using a database’s thesaurus<br />
    7. 7. Poll #2: Conducting Research<br />Don’t forget: You can copy-paste this slide into other presentations, and move or resize the poll.<br />
    8. 8. Read the articles you find in batches.<br />Identify how the articles address your themes. “Discard” those that don’t.<br />Identify other studies you want to consult by reading the lit reviews of the articles you have found. (Even better: Find a literature review on your topic.)<br />Look up key theorists or theories using encyclopedias then read the seminal works identified in those sources.<br />Connecting your research to the work of other scholars<br />
    9. 9. Kamman, M. L., & Long, S. K. (2010). One district's approach to the induction of special <br /> education teachers. Journal of Special Education Leadership, 23(1), 21-29. Retrieved from <br />http://www.casecec.org/<br />Poll #3: Finding sources<br />
    10. 10. Cole, M. (2009). Critical Race Theory and education: A <br /> Marxist response. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. <br />How would you find this?<br />
    11. 11. Darling-Hammond, L. (2009). President Obama and education: The possibility for dramatic improvements in teaching and learning. Harvard Educational Review, 79(2), 210-223. Retrieved from http://www.gse.harvard.edu/hepg/her.html<br />Hill, D. M., & Barth, M. (2004). NCLB and teacher retention: Who will turn out the lights?. Education and the Law, 16(2-3), 173-181. doi:10.1080/0953996042000291588<br />Gamoran, A. (2007). Standards-based reform and the poverty gap: Lessons for No Child Left Behind. Washington, D.C: Brookings Institution Press. <br />Find these:<br />
    12. 12. Use Web of Science to see who has cited the article you are reading by conducting a Cited Reference Search.<br />If your author has written a dissertation, he or she probably wrote an article on the same or similar topic. Conduct an author search using the major indexes (ERIC, Education Full Text, Academic Search Premier) and Google Scholar.<br />Making sure you have the most current research<br />
    13. 13. Use specialized encyclopedias, such as those in Gale Virtual Reference Library, to learn more about theorists or theories.<br />Use the encyclopedia entries to learn more about the theory being studied and seminal texts related to those theories.<br />Use WorldCator Find Journals to get those texts so you can read them.<br />Understanding theories and identifying key texts<br />
    14. 14. How do you know when you have found everything on your topic?<br />What does it mean when your professor says there is a “gap” in your literature?<br />How would you answer these questions?<br />
    15. 15. Look through the articles you have already read. How have those authors supported their work? What theories did they use?<br />Use Dissertations & Theses (Proquest) to see if other researchers have addressed your topic.<br />Are scholars in other disciplines addressing your themes? Find their literature by selecting the relevant discipline in Find Databases.<br />Mind the gap<br />
    16. 16. Why are you conducting research?<br />How do you engage or learn from the work other scholars have done before you?<br />How can you develop a theoretical underpinning for your own research?<br />How can you ensure that you have completed a comprehensive literature review?<br />Summary<br />
    17. 17. Education – Pre K–12 Educational Leadership<br />http://www.library.fullerton.edu/guides/edleadpk12/home.php<br />Educational Leadership: Higher Education<br />http://www.library.fullerton.edu/guides/edleadcommcoll/Home.php<br />For additional help:<br />

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