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Positive Discipline
 

Positive Discipline

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    Positive Discipline Positive Discipline Presentation Transcript

    • DISCIPLINE NOT PUNISHMENT An Introduction to Corporal Punishment and Positive Discipline
    • Discipline and Punishment ____________________________ Is there a difference?
    • DISCIPLINE PUNISHMENT Discere - to learn Punire - to inflict a Discipere - to penalty on, or cause comprehend pain for some Discipere - to teach offense
    • Discipline Discipline aims to teach, mentor, guide, help learn… Role of the “teacher” or “mentor” is to explain well and demonstrate/ model good behavior Discipline is part of child rearing and is not limited to situations when there is a mistake or offence
    • Punishment Penalty for doing something wrong Controlling or “correcting mistakes through the use of pain Teaching a (painful) Rosselle Arenas, 14 “lesson” so that the San Pedro, Laguna mistake will not be repeated
    • What is Corporal Punishment? Punishment or penalty for an offence – imagined or real. It involves the use of force, power, authority or intimidation to inflict some pain or discomfort on the child for purposes of training or control. It is usually administered by an adult who has the authority or responsibility for looking after or caring for the child. It has two forms – physical and emotional/ humiliating or degrading punishment.
    • What is Corporal Punishment? Hitting children with the hand or with an implement Kicking, shaking or throwing objects at children, scratching, pinching, burning, scalding or forcing them to ingest substances
    • What is Corporal Punishment? Using power, authority or threats to force children to perform physically painful or damaging acts, e.g. holding weights for an extended period, kneeling on pebbles, squatting, asking them to stand under the heat of the sun, etc.
    • What is Corporal Punishment? Threats Shaming Cursing Verbal assault Emotional or humiliating punishment: degrades, belittles, humiliates, denigrates, threatens, scares or ridicules the child.
    • Why End Corporal Punishment? Of the many forms of violence that a majority of children experience, corporal punishment is the: Most common, Most pervasive and yet Least reported and Least recognised as a form of violence. Jan Christian Chu, 7 Mandaluyong City
    • Why End Corporal Punishment? It is widespread - cutting across cultures, geography and social class… 80-98% of the world’s children experience physical punishment in their homes, with a third more experiencing severe physical punishment with the use of implements. (World Report on Violence against Children 2006)
    • Why End Corporal Punishment? 85% of Filipino children said they are punished in the home 82% said they were hit on different parts of their body; of this number, 65% reported that spanking is the most common form of punishment they experienced. (Save the Children Sweden 2005)
    • Why End Corporal Punishment? It is hurting children. In the short term, corporal punishment “…kills thousands of children each year and injures and handicaps many more.” “In the longer term…it [is] a significant factor in the development of violent behavior, and it is associated with other problems in childhood and later life.” (WHO’s World Report on Violence and Health 2002)
    • Why End Corporal Punishment? Children want it to stop. Children all over the world say they do not want to be hurt, and that they wish there are other ways of disciplining them. Filipino children say they will learn better if their parents and teachers: (1) Talk to them in a calm and understanding way; (2) Explain to them what they have done wrong or how they should do things the right way; and (3) Make them feel that they are still loved and accepted.
    • Why End Corporal Punishment? It has harmful effects on children. It can cause serious physical and psychological harm to children. Injury, disability, even death Fear, anger, anxiety Low self-esteem Displaced anger and aggression Rebelliousness and resentment Depression or intense loneliness Weak decision-making skills and self-control
    • Why End Corporal Punishment? It has harmful effects on families and cultures. It damages a child’s relationship with his/her parents/adults. It perpetuates a culture of violence.
    • Why End Corporal Punishment? It violates children’s rights. States have the obligation to fulfill the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). Say NO to corporal punishment
    • Positive Discipline
    • DISCIPLINE = TEACHING Positive discipline is part of an education process, a way of thinking and an approach to teaching that: Helps children develop appropriate thinking and behavior in the short and long-term. Helps children develop self- discipline and confidence. Guides children to be in harmony with self and others.
    • Positive discipline is not… Permissive parenting An absence of rules, limits or expectations Short-term reactions or alternative punishments to slapping or hitting
    • Positive Discipline and Children’s Rights Respect for the human dignity and physical integrity of children Recognition of children’s capacities and their right to participate Ensuring children’s best interests at all times
    • Positive Discipline Principles Problem-Solving Positive & healthy Supportive learning relationship environment (Warmth) (Structure) Understanding how children think and feel Long-term goals
    • Planning • Long-term goals
    • What kind of people do we want our children to become? Respectful & has empathy for others Disciplined & responsible Can make wise Goal-directed decisions Analytical Able to form healthy Life-long learner relationships Honest Confident & has a Has faith solid self-esteem
    • What can we do? Reflect on the values and life skills we want to teach children Make day-to-day problem situations an occasion for teaching these values and life skills Model these values and life skills (respect, taking responsibility, wisdom, handling conflict, empathy) to children
    • Knowledge •• Long-term goals • Long-termLong-term goals Long-termgoals goals Long-term goals Long-term goals Understanding how children think and feel Long-term goals
    • Understanding How Children Think and Feel Children at different ages need different kinds of support and information. Children’s developmental stage and other extenal factors affect how they think, feel and behave.
    • Tools for Understanding How Children Think and Feel Typical development Empathy Observation Listening Specific context or situation
    • Typical Development Pre-adolescent period Start of physical and hormonal changes at puberty Establishing independence Forming opinions about parents/authority figures and about what is going on around them
    • The Role of the Adult Pre-adolescent period • Continue building trust by listening to the child’s stories • Letting the child express his/her emotions and teaching him/her how to manage these • Show that you accept the child even if he/she has made a mistake • Continue to help the child see the consequences of his/her negative action
    • Typical Development Adolescence Establishing identity Setting long-term goals for oneself Challenging authority Establishing intimate relationships
    • The Role of the Adult Adolescence Respectful monitoring of activities Engaging the adolescent in discussions about identity, intimate relationships and risky behaviours Listening to and respecting the child’s opinion Be firm and consistent about non-negotiables
    • Understanding Temperament Temperament – child’s specific way of interacting/reacting to the environment Dimensions – activity level, regularity, response to new situations, adaptability, distractability, persistence, intensity Important for parents to recognise similarities and differences between one’s own and the child’s temperament to be able to identify the child’s specific needs and the appropriate responses.
    • Specific context: living on the street Lack of adult support and structure The child becomes street smart Experience of violence in the streets Need to build trust Gently reintroduce structure Teach non-violence in conflict resolution Redirect behaviour toward positive goals
    • Specific context: child abuse Low of self-esteem Difficulty in making friends; shyness Aggression Need to rebuild trust Consistency in providing structure
    • Specific context: the working child Need for support to manage the demands of work and school that creates pressure on the child Need for protection: check conditions of work Listen to the child’s stories/observe physical and emotional changes Respect: giving the child his/her share of income
    • Specific context: the child in conflict with the law Rebuild trust by listening to the child’s opinions Rebuild respect by challenging negative notions but also recognising good ideas Help the child understand the long-term consequences of his/her actions on self and others
    • Understanding How Children Think and Feel
    • Tools Positive & healthy Supportive learning relationship environment (Warmth) (Structure) Understanding how children think and feel Long-term goals
    • A Positive and Healthy Relationship with Children Children learn best when they feel respected, understood, trusted, safe and loved.
    • We can demonstrate respect and empathy by… Showing children that they are still respected and accepted even when they do something wrong or when they commit mistakes Listening to them Looking at their situation from their point of view Laughing with them Supporting them when they are facing challenges Encouraging them when they have to do something difficult Telling them that they believe in them Recognizing their efforts and successes Showing them that they trust them
    • Creating a Supportive Learning Environment A supportive environment provides children with appropriate information and guidance to facilitate learning, decision- making and problem solving.
    • We can build a supportive learning environment by… Explaining the reasons for rules Helping them find ways to fix their mistakes in a way that helps them learn Teaching them about the effects of their actions on other people Being fair and consistent Controlling anger; manage frustration and anger in a healthy way
    • Skills Problem-Solving Positive & healthy Supportive learning relationship environment (Warmth) (Structure) Understanding how children think and feel Long-term goals
    • Problem- Problem-Solving Remember your long-term goals Think before you act. Transform the challenging situation into a constructive learning event for both the child and the teacher. Most actions that adults oftentimes label as “misbehaviors” are but a natural part of children’s development and should not be seen as threats to adults’ authority. It is therefore helpful to think ahead, anticipate problems that may arise, and plan a response.
    • Positive discipline… Is about finding long-term solutions to everyday parenting challenges that will develop a child’s self- discipline Involves building mutually respectful relationships with children, clearly communicating expectations, rules and limits; and increasing children’s competence and confidence to handle challenging situations Is all about teaching life-long skills among children and at the same time respecting their rights as human beings.
    • Positive discipline… Is about finding long-term solutions to everyday parenting challenges that will develop a child’s self-discipline Involves building mutually respectful relationships with children, clearly communicating expectations, rules and limits; and increasing children’s competence and confidence to handle challenging situations Is all about teaching life-long skills among children and at the same time respecting their rights as human beings.
    • Using positive discipline is a process. It will take time and needs family support.
    • Let us support Anti-Corporal Punishment Bill! Let us END Corporal Punishment on Children Now!