Chap 1 preparing_for_success_in_college

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Chap 1 preparing_for_success_in_college

  1. 1. Chapter 1 Preparing for Success in College Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  2. 2. The purpose of this chapter is to perk your thoughts on how to take charge right away and get a strong start in college. Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  3. 3. Are you ready? Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  4. 4. Learning Outcomes <ul><li>Clarify your reasons for going to college. </li></ul><ul><li>Appreciate the advantages of a college education. </li></ul><ul><li>Become socially and academically involved in your school community. </li></ul><ul><li>Use your school’s resources and services. </li></ul><ul><li>Understand your school’s policies. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop an efficient transportation plan. </li></ul><ul><li>Make the most of financial management strategies and student financial aid options. </li></ul><ul><li>Balance the demands of work, school, family, and friends. </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  5. 5. You won’t regret doing your best in college! <ul><li>Genius without education </li></ul><ul><li>is like silver in the mine. </li></ul><ul><li>— Benjamin Franklin </li></ul><ul><li>What did Benjamin mean? </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  6. 6. Review text Exercise 1-1: The reasons I’m going to college <ul><li>Let’s conduct a quick class survey on the top 2 reasons you are going to college. </li></ul><ul><li>Based on our class survey, what seems to be the top 2–3 most compelling reasons to go to college? </li></ul><ul><li>How can your reasons for going to college motivate you to succeed in college? </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  7. 7. -Small Group Discussion- Think about it! <ul><li>1. What do you like most about college? </li></ul><ul><li>2. What do you like least about college? </li></ul><ul><li>3. What do you fear most about college? </li></ul><ul><li>4. How would the above relate to a new job? </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  8. 8. Financial Advantages of a College Education <ul><li>College graduates : </li></ul><ul><li>earn higher wages. </li></ul><ul><li>are more likely to receive employer-provided health insurance & pension benefits. </li></ul><ul><li>receive a broad education. </li></ul><ul><li>gain expertise in their field. </li></ul><ul><li>Any other advantages? </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  9. 9. U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) 2007 Reports: <ul><li>“ Generally speaking, jobs that require high levels of education and skill pay higher wages than jobs that require few skills and little education.” </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  10. 10. Earnings and Education, 4th quarter 2008 (DOL) age 25 and up Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  11. 11. Wages in Healthcare Practitioner and Technical Occupations (DOL 2007) Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.                                                                                                                                                                                
  12. 12. National Compensation Survey <ul><li>Occupational Wages—U.S. (June 2006) </li></ul><ul><li> Link to hourly earnings listed by occupation </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.bls.gov/ncs/ocs/sp/ncbl0910.pdf </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  13. 13. Taking Control  Balancing School, Work, Family, Friends, and More <ul><li>1. Control your schedule—time management skills are one of the most valuable skills for college, career, and personal success. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The “Making Time Work for You” chapter will help you adopt time management strategies. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2. Keep a firm grasp on your priorities. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Understanding what your PRIORITIES are each and every day is one of the biggest keys to college success. </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  14. 14. -Small Group Discussion- Think about it! <ul><li>1. What obstacles and/or distractions could keep you from doing your best in college? </li></ul><ul><li>2. How can you overcome the obstacles and distractions to succeed in college? </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  15. 15. Get Connected: Social and Academic Involvement at Your College is a Good Investment <ul><li>National student engagement research has shown : </li></ul><ul><li>When students invest themselves in school-related activities for socializing or learning, they become more attached to their school and achieve their educational goals. </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  16. 16. Be Academically Involved at School <ul><li>1. Actively participate in class activities. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Study in the library or campus study areas. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Meet with your instructors and advisor. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Join a student organization or student chapter of your professional organization. </li></ul><ul><li>5. Get tutoring as soon as you encounter difficulties—even if you just need a little help. </li></ul><ul><li>6. Attend special school lectures and events. </li></ul><ul><li>7. Start or join a study group. </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  17. 17. Anything holding you back from being academically involved in school? Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  18. 18. Get Socially Involved at School <ul><li>What types of social events and activities are provided at our college? </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Where? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>When? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cost? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Can you bring family or friends? </li></ul></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  19. 19. Using Your School’s Resources and Services <ul><li>Our college offers student services to help you succeed both academically and personally.  </li></ul><ul><li>In small groups, list as many services as you can think of that our college makes available to you. </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  20. 20. Understand Your School’s Policies <ul><li>Knowing the college’s rules, policies, and procedures can help you succeed and avoid costly mistakes. </li></ul><ul><li>Review your responses to Exercise 1-6: Getting acquainted with your college’s academic requirements and procedures </li></ul><ul><li>What questions or concerns do you have concerning any of our college’s rules, policies, or procedures? </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  21. 21. Got Transportation? What about a backup plan? <ul><li>Situation  You have graduated from your college program. You are employed full-time by XYZ Company in ( location ) . </li></ul><ul><li>Think about what your transportation backup plan would look like while you are working for XYZ. </li></ul><ul><li>Explain your backup plan to a classmate next to you. </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  22. 22. Managing Your Money -Think Fast  Small Group Competition- (1 point for each correct item) <ul><li>1. Recall and list the textbook credit card tips. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Recall and list textbook tips for maximizing your risk for identity theft. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Based on the textbook Budgeting Plan Worksheet, write a concise list of guidelines for creating a budget plan. </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  23. 23. Financial Aid <ul><li>1. College is expensive. Costs may include food and lodging, tuition, fees, and books. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Your college’s Financial Aid Office can inform you about many sources of financial aid. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Also consider other possible sources of financial aid. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Meet all deadlines for submitting applications and documentation and be accurate . </li></ul><ul><li>5. Respond quickly and completely to all requests for additional information. </li></ul><ul><li>6. Be persistent in following up your application. </li></ul><ul><li>7. If you do receive financial aid, meet all requirements to keep and continue your aid. </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  24. 24. Need-Based Aid Funding Sources <ul><li>Financial aid packages generally include two forms of assistance: grant and scholarship funds and self-help funds. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The first portion of each student's demonstrated need is generally met with self-help funds. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Need in excess of self-help funds is met with grant and scholarship funds. </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  25. 25. Grant and Scholarship Funds <ul><li>Do not need to be repaid. </li></ul><ul><li>Are available from a variety of sources (institutional, federal, state, and local). </li></ul><ul><li>When packaging student aid awards, colleges generally include those federal and state resources for which the student is eligible. </li></ul><ul><li>Scholarship funds are derived from a variety of sources including contributions to your school. </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  26. 26. Most Common Federal Government Grant Programs <ul><li>Pell Grants </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Based on eligibility determined by the Department of Education's review of information provided on the FAFSA. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Generally available to low-income students. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For undergraduates with exceptional financial need. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Priority is given to those who receive Pell Grants. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eligibility is determined by the Financial Aid Office. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>State Student Incentive Grants (SSIG) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consist of federal and state funds and are made available by the student's home state. </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  27. 27. Other Grants <ul><li>Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education Grant (TEACH Grant) </li></ul><ul><li>The Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) </li></ul><ul><li>The National Science & Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant (National SMART Grant) </li></ul><ul><li>Institutional Grants —Colleges provide institutional grants to help make up the difference between college costs and what a family can be expected to contribute through income, savings, loans, and student earnings. </li></ul><ul><li>Other Institutional Grants —merit awards or merit scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic achievement. </li></ul><ul><li> Find out about other types of grants that our college may award. </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  28. 28. Self-Help Funds <ul><li>Self-help funds are made up of low-interest, deferred payment, subsidized loans, and work-study jobs . </li></ul><ul><li>Subsidized loans may be deferred until after the student completes his or her education. </li></ul><ul><li>Work-study jobs provide eligible students with campus earnings opportunities. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Funds earned are paid directly to the student and may be used to support educational or personal expenses. </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  29. 29. Financial Aid Information <ul><li>Free Application for Federal Student Aid </li></ul><ul><ul><li>FAFSA http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A completed FAFSA will put you in consideration for federal, state, college and private scholarships, and it’s completely free. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The only thing you’ll spend completing your FAFSA is a few minutes of your time, and you could get thousands of dollars of financial aid in return. </li></ul></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  30. 30. Student Aid on the Web <ul><li>For information about federal student aid from the U.S. Department of Education, visit  www.studentaid.ed.gov . </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  31. 31. Key Chapter Points <ul><li>1. Use your reasons for going to college to keep you motivated to succeed in college. </li></ul><ul><li>2. A college education will provide you many employment benefits now and in the future. </li></ul><ul><li>3. When you invest yourself in school-related activities for socializing or learning, you become more attached to your school and achieve your educational goals. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Our college offers services to help you succeed both academically and personally. </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  32. 32. Key Chapter Points continued <ul><li>5. Knowing the college’s rules, policies, and procedures can help you succeed and avoid costly mistakes. </li></ul><ul><li>6. Determine a backup transportation plan for school, just as you would for your job. </li></ul><ul><li>7. Make the most of financial management strategies and student financial aid options. </li></ul><ul><li>8. Time management skills are one of the most valuable skills for college, career, and personal success. </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  33. 33. Quick Assessment  Write a response to the following and turn it in to your instructor. <ul><li>What is/are your biggest challenge(s) that you are concerned may interfere with your college success? </li></ul><ul><li>What is/are your greatest strength(s) that you believe will help you be successful in college? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the top skills and/or habits you want to improve to be successful in college? </li></ul>Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  34. 34. See the light? Copyright © 2009 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

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