Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Scrum at a waterfall organization
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Scrum at a waterfall organization

3,065

Published on

Traditional organizations can benefit from running their projects using Agile/Scrum without needing to force the whole organization to change. A success on one project might lead to a organic …

Traditional organizations can benefit from running their projects using Agile/Scrum without needing to force the whole organization to change. A success on one project might lead to a organic adoption across the organization. How can we do so without an organization wide adoption? I will show how we did that on a large federally funded project at a large government organization.

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,065
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
105
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Applying SCRUM on a Government Project in a Waterfall Organization
    A Large State Agency
    Syed Rayhan
    Co-founder, Code71, Inc.
    Contact:srayhan@code71.com
    Blog:http://blog.syedrayhan.com
    Company:http://www.code71.com
    Product:http://www.scrumpad.com
  • 2. 2
    My Background
    • Co-founder, Code71, Inc.
    • 3. 15+ years of total experience
    • 4. Co-author of “Enterprise Java with UML”
    Career
    • Iterative incremental development
    • 5. Technology planning and architecture
    • 6. On-shore/Off-shore software development using Agile/Scrum
    Expertise
    • Cultural aspect of self-organizing team
    • 7. Scrum for small projects delivered remotely
    • 8. Agile engineering practices
    Interests
  • 9. 3
    Agenda
    Introduction
    Section 1
    Section 2
    Project summary
    Section 3
    Approach to Scrum adoption
    Retrospection
    Section 4
    Recap
    Section 5
    Q&A
    Section 6
  • 10. 4
    What to Expect
    • IT culture at the agencies is deeply rooted in the traditional waterfall
    • 11. Team is green in terms of working in an iterative incremental software development
    Context
    • How we are incrementally adopting Scrum
    • 12. How we are continuing to bridge the two worlds-- Scrum and Waterfall
    • 13. Candid look at what is working, what is not working, and how we have adjusted to succeed
    Focus
    Key
    Takeaways
    • How to run an Scrum project in a Waterfall organization
    • 14. How to overcome organizational resistance to adopting Scrum
    • 15. What Scrum practices to customize and why
  • 5
    Agenda
    Introduction
    Section 1
    Section 2
    Project summary
    Section 3
    Approach to Scrum adoption
    Retrospection
    Section 4
    Recap
    Section 5
    Q&A
    Section 6
  • 16. 6
    Project Context
    • VA Department of Motor Vehicle (custodian agency)
    • 17. VA Department of Transportation
    • 18. State and local law enforcement agencies
    Clients
    Project
    Justification
    • Ensure public safety on roads
    • 19. Reduce traffic collisions
    • 20. Inter agency tension
    • 21. Intra agency politics
    • 22. Federal funding
    Political
    Landscape
  • 23. 7
    Project Context (cont.)
    • 2006 through 2009
    • 24. Phased release
    • 25. 60 sprints completed to-date
    Timeline
    Funding
    • Federal grant
    • 26. $4.5 M
    • 27. Contractors and consultants
    • 28. Core team has 12 members with cross-functional
    • 29. Located on-site
    Staffing
  • 30. 8
    Transportation
    Executive Steering
    Committee
    Oversight
    Committee
    Audit
    Team
    TARB
    Working Leadership
    Committee
    AgencyResources
    Project Organization
    Program Mgr
    Lead Architect
    Scrum Coach
    IT Project Manager
    Developer
    Developer
    Developer
    Tester
    Business
    Analyst
    Business
    Analyst
    Developer
    Developer
  • 31. 9
    Project Initiation
    • Program and project managers joined in the 3rd qrt. of 2005
    • 32. High level scoping
    • 33. Feasibility study
    Program Scoping
    • Architect and Analyst joined in the 3rd qrt. of 2006
    • 34. Use case development
    • 35. Solution architecture definition
    • 36. Products and tools selection
    • 37. Software development methodology definition
    Solution Exploration
    • The team was hired by 2nd qrt. 2007
    • 38. Development environment procured and setup
    • 39. Bullpen setup for the project team
    • 40. Day-long intro to Scrum
    • 41. Day-long team assimilation
    Project Initiation
  • 42. 10
    Agenda
    Introduction
    Section 1
    Section 2
    Project summary
    Section 3
    Approach to Scrum adoption
    Section 4
    Retrospection
    Recap
    Section 5
    Q&A
    Section 6
  • 43. 11
    Why Scrum?
    Waterfall Iterative TREDS
    • Requirements are well understood
    • 44. Technology/tools are already in place
    • 45. Project is confined to single organization
    • 46. For maintenance and enhancement type project
    • 47. Small projects
    • 48. Requirements are evolving
    • 49. Technology/tools are new
    • 50. Project spans multiple organizations
    • 51. For new application
    • 52. Mid to large projects
    • 53. Functionality and technology are evolving
    • 54. Touches multiple organizations
    • 55. New technology
    • 56. Dependency on other projects that are in-flight (eg RNS, STARS)
    • 57. Large project
    The focus was internal, not external
    The scope of Scrum was the project, not the organization
  • 58. 12
    Approach to Scrum Adoption
    Phase#1
    Tactical / Sprint focus
    Implement basic elements of Scrum
    Self-organization
    Basic rituals
    Basic tracking
    Mind-shift/ behavioral adaptation
    Team formation
    Organizational acceptance/approval
    Phase#2
    Strategic / Release focus
    Implement advanced elements of Scrum
    • Release planning
    • 59. Product backlog
    • 60. Prioritization
    • 61. Advanced tracking
    • 62. Metric (velocity)
    • 63. Engineering practices
  • 13
    Phase#1 of Scrum Adoption
    • Self-organization
    • 64. Inspect and adapt
    • 65. Establishing three core roles
    • 66. Accountability and ownership
    Behavioral
    • Daily Scrum
    • 67. Sprint planning
    • 68. Burndown chart
    • 69. Sprint review
    • 70. Managing progress /commitment and impediment board
    • 71. Retrospect
    Basic Rituals
    • Team assimilation (I vs. we)
    • 72. Defining Core values
    • 73. Ground rules for team dynamics
    • 74. Building trust relationship
    • 75. Getting to know each other
    Team Formation
  • 76. 14
    Phase#2 of Scrum Adoption
    • Backlog management
    • 77. Story-based requirements
    • 78. Release burndown
    • 79. Velocity
    • 80. Product burndown
    Release Management
    • Unit testing
    • 81. Continuous integration
    • 82. Agile QA
    • 83. Test driven development
    Engineering Practices
    • Team maturation
    • 84. Re-enforcement of Core values
    • 85. Cross training
    • 86. On-boarding
    Team Formation
  • 87. 15
    Agenda
    Introduction
    Section 1
    Section 2
    Project summary
    Section 3
    Approach to Scrum adoption
    Section 4
    Retrospection
    Recap
    Section 5
    Q&A
    Section 6
  • 88. 16
    How to assimilate a new team?
    A team assembled with people working together for the first time
    No experience with iterative development
    Problem
    Use “retrospect” effectively
    Nudge the team to “storming” stage
    Strategy
    Had to let go two people who could not fit in
    Took three months for the team to start storming
    Result
    Lessons
    Learned
    Be ready to make the difficult decision of “letting go”
    Make sure the conflict do not permeate outside the team
  • 89. 17
    How to create a “self-organizing” team?
    A team habituated in command and control environment
    A team expects to get detailed direction
    Problem
    Ensure team ownership of Sprint planning
    Use “Progress/Commitment and Impediment board” effectively
    Use “Daily Scrum” and “Burndown Chart” effectively
    Strategy
    Still an on-going learning for the team
    Silos by technology/functionality resulted
    Result
    Watch for unintended silos that may result
    Nudge the team to think in terms “We vs. I”
    Lessons
    Learned
  • 90. 18
    How to create a sense of urgency?
    Laid-back environment
    Financial incentives are not designed for performance
    No clear product ownership
    Problem
    Invite clients to sprint reviews (demo)
    Strategy
    Motivated the team to forge ahead at a constant pace
    Created a sense of excitement in the minds of clients
    Helped accelerate procurement and setup of environments
    Result
    The team may start to take short-cuts to have perfect demo
    Lessons
    Learned
  • 91. 19
    How to leverage organizational politics?
    Agencies have historical tensions between each other
    Individuals have personal agendas
    Decisions seem to get stuck in a “black hole”
    Problem
    Use TARB (Technology Architecture Review Board)
    Use rules of engagement for decision making
    Identify team spokesperson for each area of interests
    Strategy
    Result
    After formation of TARB, the team was able to make technical decisions quickly
    Scrum Master should be extra vigilant about protecting the team from organization politics
    Lessons
    Learned
  • 92. 20
    What is an appropriate length of a Sprint?
    The environment was slow paced
    Find a pace to keep the team motivated
    Balancing act between being complacent and stressed
    Problem
    Target a pace that keeps the team moving steadily and that client can keep up with
    Strategy
    Considered 6-week, started with 4-week
    Switched to 2-week sprints that gave us a better pace in phase#1
    Result
    Lessons
    Learned
    3-week probably would give us the sustainable pace
  • 93. 21
    Could the team negotiate the Sprint scope, really?
    The team is apprehensive about whether Sprint scope is truly negotiable
    Scrum Master is apprehensive of the team slacking off
    Balancing act between control and trust
    Problem
    Start with trust, apply “carrot and stick” as needed
    Strategy
    Still have lingering issue with last minute de-scoping
    Challenges remain with being able to see the forest vs. tree
    Challenges remain with time management
    Result
    Lessons
    Learned
    Beware of pendulum swing in either direction
  • 94. 22
    How to plan around waterfall elements in a Sprint?
    Procurement is handled by an external agency
    Project is dependent on external people who are transient
    Problem
    Get resource commitments prior to start of a sprint
    Strategy
    50% stories dependent on waterfall resources got de-scoped
    Used a proxy to represent waterfall resources in daily Scrum
    Result
    Determine the lead time required to get resource commitment
    Look for workarounds
    Lessons
    Learned
  • 95. 23
    Bridging the two worlds using documentation
    Scrum
    Waterfall
    • Sprint Backlog
    • 96. Sprint Estimates
    • 97. Release Backlog
    • 98. Release Estimates
    Project Plan
    Tracking
    • Anticipated impediment list
    Risk Management
    Others
    • Class/Sequence diagrams
  • 24
    Audit (IV&V) feedback from Dec. 2007
    “The current schedule identifies approximately 15 phases of distinct project activity. The schedule has not been baselined and does not show both target and actual dates. The absence of a baselined schedule with target and actual dates makes it more difficult to gauge project progress. The IV&V team did find evidence that the schedule is being maintained, and that milestone dates are being met.”
    Improvement
    Opportunity
    “Indications are that this approach has worked well and will enable an on-time delivery of the functionality proposed for release early in 2008.”
    “In a project that involves three separate agencies and stakeholders, communications within the dedicated project team and extended project teams is critical. The IV&V team found that project communication receives a high degree of attention, and that overall communications within the project team and to the sponsor level at DMV is excellent.”
    Done Well
  • 110. 25
    Planned
    Actual
    %Diff.
    2.5%
    Costs
    $1.66M
    $1.7M
    6 weeks
    Timeline
    Jan 15, 2008
    February 28, 2008
    Was Scrum helpful?
    Issues surfaced early to help avoid impact on project schedule
    Allowed scope change as late as a month before the release
    Allowed us to do partial release
    Risk
    Flexibility
    Result of the 1st Release
  • 111. 26
    Agenda
    Introduction
    Section 1
    Section 2
    Project summary
    Section 3
    Approach to Scrum adoption
    Section 4
    Retrospection
    Recap
    Section 5
    Q&A
    Section 6
  • 112. 27
    Recap lessons learned
    Scrum can be successfully used on Government projects that are staffed with contractors and consultants
    Accommodate waterfall world by mapping key Scrum artifacts to traditional artifacts
    Be ready to “let go” those who does not fit in the Scrum environment
    Invite appropriate business stakeholders to Sprint reviews to generate excitement
    Use “stick and carrot” to strike a balance between “self-organization” and “command and control”
  • 113. 28
    Recap lessons learned contd.
    Determine the lead time required to be able to plan around Waterfall elements of the project
    Choose appropriate length for the sprint- 2/3 weeks
    Use central decision making committee with engagement rules
    Identify team spokesperson for each area of interests (i.e., architecture, project management, business requirements, etc.)
    Hire the right people- 50% for technical ability, 50% for ability to self-organize, and make sure to give a tour of the working environment (Bullpen)…
  • 114. 29
    Q&A
    That’s me
    Agile Coach
    “Retrospect session”
  • 115. 30
    Contact
    Please contact for on-site training/coaching or Webinar:
    Contact:srayhan@code71.com
    Blog:http://blog.syedrayhan.com
    Company:http://www.code71.com
    Product:http://www.scrumpad.com

×