Rio 2016 Accessibility Guidelines English Version

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Rio 2016 Accessibility Guidelines English Version

  1. 1. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines Version 3 January 2014 | Rio de Janeiro
  2. 2. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines Version 3 December 2013 | Rio de Janeiro
  3. 3. Access and circulation.......................................................7 1.1 Circulation................................................................7 1.2 Ramps....................................................................20 1.3 Stairs and steps................................................... 25 1.4 Reception areas...................................................28 1.5 Entrances.............................................................. 32 1.6 Lifts ........................................................................37 1.7 Emergency facilities............................................ 43 Sports venues................................................................... 47 2.1 Grandstands......................................................... 47 2.2 Toilets................................................................... 54 2.3 Changing rooms..................................................69 Accommodation...............................................................73 3.1 Accessible bedrooms...........................................75 3.2 Wheelchair-friendly bedrooms........................ 93 3.3 Reception areas................................................... 95 3.4 Entrances to common areas.............................96 3.5 Halls for seminars and meetings..................... 97 3.6 Swimming pools and decks............................100 3.7 Restaurants, cafés and bars.............................101 3.8 Stores...................................................................103 3.9 Parking.................................................................103 3.10 Support services.............................................106 3.11 Temporary solutions.......................................106 1 3 2
  4. 4. Transport..........................................................................107 4.1 Land transport.................................................... 112 4.2 Maritime transport...........................................138 4.3 Air transport.......................................................145 Visual, oral, electronic and digital communication...............................................................153 5.1 Publications.........................................................154 5.2 Websites..............................................................163 5.3 Telecommunications........................................ 164 5.4 Signage............................................................... 169 5.5 Guidelines for communication in service provision...........................................177 5.6 Description of images and sounds.................181 5.7 Real-time captions ............................................181 5.8 Technical assistance..........................................181 Appendix..........................................................................183 4 6 5
  5. 5. The Organising Committee for the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games has the aim of ensuring necessary conditions for everyone to be able to participate comfortably, autonomously and safely in both events. In order for the public, athletes, judges, media professionals and the other people involved to have universal access, it is necessary to follow certain technical parameters in the construction of facilities directly and indirectly related to organising the Games. This document combines the accessibility standards issued by the Brazilian Technical Standards Association (ABNT)* with the requirements of the International Paralympic Committee (IPC)’s Accessibility Guide and Brazilian laws, decrees and resolutions. The purpose of this publication is to guide the design, development and implementation of projects. Reading this publication, however, does not exclude the reader from consulting existing standards and laws. The work of ensuring compatibility between these standards and guidelines was performed by Nucleo Pró-Acesso (Pro-Access Centre) at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). The recommendations made by the Pro-Access Center are based on practical experiences. The first chapter, which addresses aspects related to sports venue arrivals and departures, provides information about access points and circulation areas, as well as emergency facilities. The second chapter concerns sports venues themselves, providing technical specifications for the sectors designated for the public, as well as toilets and changing rooms. The theme of the third chapter is accommodation infrastructure, describing the concepts of accessible bedrooms and wheelchair-friendly bedrooms, as well as technical standards for accessibility in parking areas, receptions, restaurants and other common areas. The fourth chapter is dedicated to land, maritime, air and waterway transport modes. Finally, the fifth chapter explains how visual, oral, electronic and digital communication can and should provide universal access to relevant information for all those involved in the Games. On 9 October 2009, in Copenhagen, Rio de Janeiro received the mission to bring the Olympic and Paralympic Movements to a new territory. For the first ever time, the greatest sports event on the planet will be held in South America. The Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games are an excellent opportunity to raise awareness among the public and governments of the countries of our continent about the importance of universal
  6. 6. accessibility. According to the census conducted in 2010 by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE), around 45 million Brazilians – nearly 24% of the population – have some kind of disability. The improvement in accessibility levels not just in Rio, but throughout Brazil, will be one of the biggest and most enduring legacies of the Olympics. This document is a reference tool for the definition of accessibility standards in Olympic and Paralympic-related construction in the design phase. For construction in progress, these accessibility standards shall, where possible, be adopted, considering cost and legacy criteria. * ABNT standards are identified in this report by the abbreviation NBR (Norma brasileira)
  7. 7. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 7 1.1 Circulation • A minimum width of 2.00m is recommended for circulation spaces at sports venues and common areas of non-sports venues (Figure 1.1). In cases where this measurement is not possible, one should not create circulation spaces narrower than 1.20m • The width of circulation spaces in flat areas and on stairs at new sports venues should be calculated based on the parameters used by the Fire Brigade and the Green Guide In circulation areas: • At sports venues, flows will always be considered medium or high (greater than or equal to 25 people per metre/minute) • Provide “manoeuvre pockets” 1.50m in radius every 10m (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) • Pave surfaces with regular anti-slip coatings to minimise vibrations of wheeled objects. Surface should be free of obstacles, with a maximum transversal inclination of 2% for internal floors and 3% for external floors (NBR 9,050/2004) • Slopes or obstacles must be marked with contrasting tactile ground markings • Tactile directional ground marks must be used in wide circulation spaces and where there are preferred circulation routes (IPC and NBR 9,050/2004) Access and circulation 1
  8. 8. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 20138 2.00m Sports wheelchair Circulation space for two people in wheelchairs, one of them using a sports wheelchair used by athletes Regular wheelchair Max i = 2% (internal floors) Max i = 3% (external floors) 1.50m Circulation space for two people, one using a wheelchair Max i = 2% (internal floors) Max i = 3% (external floors) 1.00 Circulation space for one person using a wheelchair Max i = 2% (int. floors) and 3% (ext. floors) Figure 1.1
  9. 9. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 9 1.1.1 Accessible routes Definition of accessible route: A continuous, unobstructed and signposted path that connects external or internal environments of spaces and buildings, and that can be used autonomously and safely by everyone, including people with disabilities and reduced mobility. Accessible routes may incorporate parking areas, lowered pavements, pedestrian crossings, corridors, floors, stairs and ramps, among other features (Figure 1.2). • Each building must have all accessible routes interconnecting pavements, parking areas, entrances, grandstands, toilets, other services and facilities in accordance with the requirements described in this document • In the case of adaptation of existing buildings where it is not possible to guarantee accessibility on all routes, there must be at least one entrance that permits universal access, no more than 50m from the other access points (NBR 9,050/2004) • All obstacles or furniture must be properly marked • Protruding objects must be avoided in circulation areas • In buildings with large flows of people, there must be no carpets or rugs • Ramps must follow Brazilian standard NBR 9,050/2004, which establishes the maximum inclination of 8.33%. According to an IPC recommendation, one must adopt a maximum inclination of 5%. For more details, see item 1.2 • In free spaces or areas with large flows, it is advisable to have spaces with a diameter of 1.80m to permit a complete rotation of 360° (IPC). In other cases, use the measurements presented in item 1.1 • Air space free from obstacles, with a vertical clearance of at least 2.10m (IPC) • Lighting must be sufficient to permit people with hearing deficiencies to lip read or use sign language (IPC) • One must discuss the applicability of tactile directional ground marks on concourses, meaning wide spaces with intense public circulation inside stadia
  10. 10. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201310 1.1.2 Street crossings • At pedestrian crossings, we recommend stable, anti-slip paving that minimises vibrations of wheeled objects • The pavement should be accessed via ramps with a maximum inclination of 5% (best practice according to the IPC). If this is not possible, one may adopt a maximum inclination of 8.33% (NBR 9,050/2004) • Best practice calls for a 5% inclination on side rims. If this is not possible, one may adopt a maximum inclination of 10% (NBR 9,050/2004) Minimum width: • This must be 4.00m in cases of pedestrian flows considered low, with up to 500 pedestrians per hour (NBR 9,050/2004), and 6.00m in cases of greater flows Pavement Tactile warning marks Service strip access ramp Free strip Low street furniture for people of short stature and people using wheelchairs Visual signage and sound aids at street crossing Access to building identified with tactile warning marks Low street furniture for people of short stature and people using wheelchairs Figure 1.2
  11. 11. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 11 • A minimum width of 1.50m is acceptable exclusively in the case of alleys and narrow streets with a street width of less than 6.00m (IPC) Signage (Figure 1.3): • Mark with tactile paving (see item 1.1.5) • Sounds indicating functioning of traffic lights (IPC and NBR 9,050/2004) • Pedestrian crossings must stand out and be painted in a contrasting colour (NBR 9,050/2004). This may be obtained through a contrast between a smooth-surfaced white strip and rough-surfaced dark asphalt (see item 1.1.5) Figure 1.3 Pavement PavementStreet Sounds indicating functioning of traffic lights Sound traffic lightsTactile warning marks
  12. 12. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201312 1.1.3 Special parking spaces • Special parking spaces must always be linked to accessible routes (Figure 1.5) Quantification: • At least 2% of all regulated parking spaces for people with physical and visual disabilities (Contran Resolution 304) Pedestrian crossings through elevated strips: • This option must be selected in the following cases: a narrow carriageway, a large flow of pedestrians associated with a small flow of vehicles, or where there are narrow pavements, where it is not possible to leave a flat space with a minimum width of 1.00m in addition to the ramp (Figure 1.4) Pavement PavementStreet Sounds indicating functioning of traffic lights Sound traffic lightsTactile warning marks Figure 1.4
  13. 13. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 13 • At least 5% of all regulated parking spaces for elderly people (Contran Resolution 303) Dimensions of parking spaces: • Minimum 5.00 x 2.50m (NBR 9,050/2004), plus additional space of at least 1.20m in width for transfer (Figure 1.6) • Special parking spaces must be duly identified using vertical and ground signs, and they must always be associated with access ramps or lowered kerbs Parking spaces for vans: • One must also provide parking spaces for taxis and vans equipped with elevators • Van arrival areas must have a space for mobile ramps installed between the van and pavement. Accordingly, in addition to the van’s parking space (2.50 x 7.00m), there must be a bay measuring 2.50m in width 5.00 2.50 2.50 1.20 0.50 1.70 1.70 Dimensions in metres Figure 1.5
  14. 14. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201314 Transport drop-off areas (Figure 1.7): • Drop-off areas for athletes with or without disabilities, their companions, their coaches, the media and other people who will access different sports and non-sports facilities and services must be located as near as possible to entrances and seats, in order to minimise travel distances (IPC) • Drop-off areas must be outside common areas for parking and near main access points • One accessible drop-off area must have a level access path adjacent and parallel to parking spaces. When there is a kerb separating parking spaces from this access path or an accessible route, one must provide a ramp to allow people with disabilities to use this route, preferably leading to the main accessible entrance (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) 5.00 1.70 2.50 1.20 Dimensions in metres Max i = 8.33% 1.70 Figure 1.6
  15. 15. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 15 • When a distance is greater than 500m or a route has steep ramps, resources must be provided for people with reduced mobility at the location, enabling them to go to the venue entrance or exit. These resources may include small cars, vans or small buses with a low floor, for example (IPC) • For people with visual disabilities, a way must be found and supplied to enable independent movement, connecting the main transportation access points to at least one public entrance for each venue, preferably the main entrance (IPC) Min 7.00 Min 2.50 Min 0.50 0.40to0.60 0.75 to 1.00 and pick-up area Tactile warning marks Tactile directional marks Dimensions in metresFigure 1.7
  16. 16. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201316 1.1.4 Pavements Pavements are defined by ABNT as “part of a street, normally segregated and on a different level, not designated for the circulation of vehicles, but reserved for the movement of pedestrians and, when possible, the implementation of street furniture, signage, vegetation and other elements”. • One must guarantee pedestrian crossings free from all obstacles, hazards and any elements that interfere in the air space above the circulation strip • If it is not possible to guarantee a totally free strip, the street furniture must have a colour contrasting with the pavement and it must be detectable by someone with a visual deficiency or poor eyesight using a cane (IPC) • Vertical air space free of obstacles must be at least 2.10m. When the width of the pavement – on which there must be a ramp for crossing the street – does not permit a flat area of at least 1.00m in addition to the ramp, the pavement must be lowered to the level of the pedestrian crossing, with an inclination of no more than 8.33% and markings on the ground to indicate the lowering (Figure 1.8) • Commercial streets may have an access strip on which merchandise may be displayed, provided that there is a minimum distance of 0.75m for the service strip (lamp posts, street furniture and flowerbeds) and a minimum distance of 1.20m for a free strip (Figure 1.9) • The minimum recommended width is 1.50m. A width of 1.20m is tolerated in the case of existing pavements that cannot be widened (NBR 9,050/2004). The strip free from obstacles may not be narrower than 1.20m (Figure 1.10)
  17. 17. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 17 Building Free Strip Service Strip Min 0.70Min 1.20 Aerial obstacle Service strip Street furniture Service strip – min 0.75 Min.2.10 Street Free Strip Service Strip Min 0.70Min 1.20 i = 5% Dimensions in metres Recommended i = 5% Max i = 8,33% Building Figure 1.8
  18. 18. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201318 Min 0.75 Service strip Free strip Access strip Min 1.20 Min2.20 Dimensions in metres Main Max inclination 5% Side ramp Max inclination 5% Side ramp Min 1.50platform Total lowering of pavement SS 0.30 0.50 0.30 Dimensions in metres Tactile warning marks Alignment of property Figure 1.9 Figure 1.10
  19. 19. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 19 1.1.5 Tactile ground markings Tactile ground markings aid the mobility of people with visual disabilities, informing, warning, directing and indicating ways. It may be of “warning” or “directional” nature (Figure 1.9). Tactile warning marks: • Composed of blister paving to inform pedestrians of the need for redoubled attention • Signal obstacles, changes in levels, crossings, changes in the path’s direction, lift entrances (direction of control panel) and risk of falling • Placed around suspended obstacles that protrude more at a higher level than at a lower level • Must be installed along the edges of changes in level and around obstacles, making up a strip between 0.25 and 0.60m in width • Signal suspended obstacles measuring between 0.60 and 2.10m. In this case, the marked area must be 0.60m longer than the protuberance of the obstacle Tactile directional marks: • Raised parallel bars to indicate the direction of movement • Used in wide spaces without guiding objects (flowerbeds and walls), considering paths and points of interest • Avoid circulation crossings and interference in queuing areas Dimensions (warning and directional): • Width between 0.25 and 0.60cm • Maximum difference in level of 1.50cm • Above all, colour contrasts must consider nuances between light and dark, in order to facilitate perception among the highest possible number of people with different types of visual disabilities. It is advisable to use the table of contrasting colours in NBR 9,050/2004
  20. 20. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201320 1.2 Ramps The IPC considers ramps (Figure 1.11) to be “any inclined plane associated with or replacing a stair, which permits easy access to a building or elevated area”. Ramps must have an anti-slip, regular, firm surface that minimises vibration of wheeled objects, with detectable warning markings in a colour contrasting with the ground (IPC and NBR 9,050/2004): • Maximum declivity of 8.33% for maximum heights of 0.80m at each segment of the ramp (NBR 9,050/2004) • Declivity of 5% for maximum heights of 1.50m at each segment of the ramp (NBR 9,050/2004) • Ramps inclination must be calculated according to the equation [i = (h x 100) : c], where “i” is the percent of inclination, “h” is the height of vertical rise in metres and “c” is the length of horizontal run in metres • According to NBR 9,050/2004, the maximum length for each ramp segment may vary from 9.60 up to 30m, according to the chosen inclination. See the last column of the table above • Inclusion of at least one landing every 9m (IPC) Width of ramps in public places: • The minimum obligatory width of a ramp at a sports venue is 1.20m (Article 58 of Decree 44,035/2013 of the Rio de Janeiro Military Fire Brigade Code – CBMERJ) • Minimum recommended width of 1.50m (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) • In the case of housing with few floors and individualised access, the adoption of a width of 1.20m is tolerated (NBR 9,050/2004) • The minimum width of a ramp in a location of public circulation is 1.20m, according to the CBMERJ, and 2.00m, according to the IPC Admissible inclination at every ramp segment (i) Maximum height of each ramp segment (h) Maximum number of ramp segments Maximum length of each ram segment (c) 5,00 (1:20) 1,50 Unlimited 30 5,00 (1:20) < i ≤ 6,25 (1:16) 1,00 Unlimited 16 6,25 (1:16) < i ≤ 8,33 (1:12) 0,80 15 9,6
  21. 21. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 21 Landing at start of ramp Tactile warning marks Circulation Max 9.00Min 1.50 Max inclination 8.33% Max inclination 8.33% Restricted locations – min 1.20 Public access – min 2.00 Min1.50 Min1.20 Rise Dimensions in metres Landing for change in direction Landing at end of ramp Figure 1.11 • The maximum longitudinal inclination is 5% and the maximum transversal inclination is 2% (IPC) Ramp landings: • Ramps must have at least one landing every 9m in their horizontal projection (IPC)
  22. 22. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201322 Landings must measure at least the following: • 1.20m length x width of ramp, in the case of housing and small ramps with small flows (NBR 9,050/2004) • 2.00m length x width for ramps with medium and large flows • 2.10m length x 2.10m width of area free from obstacles on landings on long ramps (more than 9m long) • In the case of remodelling of existing properties, a landing measuring at least 1.00m with maximum ramp segments of 4.00m (horizontal projection measurement) is tolerated Curving ramps (Figure 1.12): • Maximum inclination of 8.33% including a minimum radius of 3.00m (NBR 9,050/2004) • The IPC recommends at least one landing every 9m Other ramp measurements must be respected on short ramps: • The minimum width of a ramp in a sports venue is 1.20m (CBMERJ), although 1.50m is recommended (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) • In the case of housing with few floors and individualised access, the adoption of a width of 1.20m is tolerated (NBR 9,050/2004) • The minimum width of a ramp in a location of public circulation is 1.20m (CBMERJ), although 2.00m is recommended (IPC) • The maximum longitudinal inclination is 5% and the maximum transversal inclination is 2% (IPC) Minimum measurements of landings: • 1.20m width of ramp, in the case of housing and small ramps with small flows (NBR 9,050/2004) • 2.00m width for ramps with medium and large flows • 2.10 x 2.10m of space free from obstacles on landings on long ramps (longer than 9m)
  23. 23. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 23 Landing Landing Min 1.20 M ax 9.00 M ax 9.00 M ax i 8.33% M ax i 8.33% Maxi8.33% M ax9.00 Min1.20 Min1.20 Min R = 3.00 Dimensions in metres Kick plate guide (0.05 x 0.05) Handrail at two heights Tactile warning marks Tactile warning marks Figure 1.12
  24. 24. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201324 1.2.1 Handrail on stairs and ramps Recommendations about handrails (Figure 1.13): • They must be installed on ramps and stairs, on both sides, at two heights: 0.92 and 0.70m off the ground (NBR 9,050/2004) • Lateral handrails must be continuous, without interruptions on landings of stairs and ramps, and they must protrude at least 30cm from the ends, without interfering in circulation areas or hindering gaps (NBR 9,050/2004 and IPC requirements) • They must permit good grip and easy slippage • Dimension of section between 3.0cm and 4.5cm (IPC), whether the handrail has an oval, elliptical or circular section • Where it is necessary to install a guardrail and handrail together, the handrail must have a maximum height of 0.92m and the guardrail must have the height proposed by CBMERJ and NBR 9,077/2001 • Consult article 58, item c of the CBMERJ Code • Consult articles 58 and 68 of the CBMERJ Code regarding continuous handrails • If it is impossible to install a handrail at two heights, the height must be between 0.80 and 0.92m (CBMERJ) 3 to 4.5 Min 4 3 to 4.5 Min 6 Min15 Dimensions in centimetresFigure 1.13
  25. 25. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 25 • Stairs or ramps with a width of more than 2.40m must have an intermediate handrail that is only interrupted when the landing is longer than 1.40m, guaranteeing minimum spacing of 0.80m between the end of one segment and the start of the next (NBR 9,050/2004) • Handrails on fixed stairs and ramps must have visual and Braille signs identifying the floor. These signs should be installed on the upper line of the horizontal extension of the handrail (Figure 1.14). Alternatively, the signs may be installed on the side walls • Built-in handrails must be spaced 6cm in relation to the back wall and 15cm in relation to the top surface 30cm 92cm 70cm 1.3 Stairs and steps Stairs must not be the only access option. They must be associated with ramps or other vertical circulation equipment. Dimensions: • The dimension of the riser must be 15 to 18cm (consult the CBMERJ Code, article 59, part VII) • Consult the formula for stairs in the CBMERJ Code, article 58 and 59 Figure 1.14
  26. 26. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201326 • Stairs must comply with the CBMERJ Code. The Blondel formula may be applied to design a good set of stairs (2h + p ≥ 62cm and ≤ 64cm) • The IPC suggests a height of between 12.5 and 18cm for stair risers • The IPC suggests having treads measuring between 28 and 35cm • The minimum width of stairs must be 1.50m • In the case of small flows, a width of 1.20m is tolerated (NBR 9,050/2004) Characteristics: • Stairs must not have open risers • The start of the steps must be at least 30cm from the adjacent circulation area (Figure 1.15) • Using nosing or inclined risers is not recommended. If they are used, the edge may project no more than 1.5cm over the tread below • Minimum lighting in an environment with stairs must be 100 lux 70cm Min 30cm Landing Riser Tread Handrail at two heights 92cm Tactile warning marks Figure 1.15
  27. 27. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 27 Stair landings (Figure 1.16): • A new landing in addition to an intermediate one is necessary whenever stairs exceed a height of 3.20m and whenever there is a change in direction (NBR 9,050/2004) • The minimum width of landings must be 1.20m • The maximum transversal inclination of landings must be 1% in indoor areas and 2% in outdoor areas • Enclosed escape stairs must have intermediate landings every 16 steps, which must be at least 1.20m long, according to Decree 897, article 183, part IV of the CBMERJ Fire and Panic Safety Code (Cosip) Stair surfaces: • Stairs must have anti-slip, regular and firm treads, with detectable warning markings in a colour that contrasts with the tread (IPC and NBR 9,050/2004) • In general, stair and ramp landings may not have tactile warning markings. Continuous handrails must serve as guide lines to orientate circulation, as established in NBR 9,050/2004 • Stair handrails are identical to ramp handrails Handrail Landing Min 0.30 Min 1.50 0.12to0.18 Min1.20Min1.20 0.28 to 0.35 Max 0.015 Dimensions in metres Anti-slip texture Min width 0.03 Figure 1.16
  28. 28. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201328 1.4 Reception areas One part of each service desk must have the following measurements (Figure 1.17): • Maximum height of service desk: 0.90m (IPC) • Minimum free height under the desk: 0.75m (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) • Minimum free width of desk: 0.90m (NBR 9,050/2004) • Minimum free depth under the desk: 0.50m (NBR 9,050/2004) or 0.50m (IPC) • Tactile directional markings must be installed to indicate the path to the reception desk, ending 30cm before the start of the desk Min 0.50m Min0.85m Min0.75m Figure 1.17 1.4.1 Waiting and queuing area Although Federal Decree 5,296/2004 provides for high-priority service, one must consider universal design to offer conditions that respect physical differences. Follow IPC guidelines for the organisation and orientation of queues: • Minimum width of 1.20m free from barriers and a maximum floor inclination of 3% • If a queue exceeds 30m in length, provide benches for high- priority customers to rest on, 0.46m in height
  29. 29. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 29 1.4.2 Snack bars and cafés • Minimum distance of 5.00m to exits (tunnels, stairs and ramps), according to article 37 of the CBMERJ Code • Snack bars and cafés must have anti-slip flooring with tactile directional marks, leading customers to the counter, and proximity warnings 0.30m from the counter • At least one menu option in Braille, on matte paper, must be offered, with large letters and high-contrast colours • Consult the Green Guide for more information Service desk (Figure 1.18): • Maximum height: 0.85m • Free height under the counter: 0.75m • Distance from end of tactile floor to start of counter: 0.30m • Approach area under the counter: 0.50m (IPC) • Maximum distance between sales counter and service counter: 0.60m Cafés with internet access (IPC recommendations): • Cafés with internet access must offer computers with specific characteristics to cater to everyone • Entrance doors must be easy to access, with a step no more than 0.50cm high and a minimum door width of 1.20m • Aisles between tables/desks and tables must have a minimum width of 1.00m • The height of computer desks must be between 0.75 and 0.85m • The height of seats must be between 0.44 and 0.48m • One must leave a circulation space under tables/desks to avoid creating obstacles for guide dogs 1.4.3 Restaurants and canteens • Restaurants must offer a range of possibilities for circulation and seats, without ever segregating people with disabilities in a specific area • Signage for restaurant toilets must be made of signs with pictograms
  30. 30. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201330 Circulation between tables: • Provide circulation spaces free from barriers, including occupied chairs and tables, with a minimum width of 1.00m – ideally 1.20m – between chairs with people seated on them • Rotation areas must be provided with a minimum radius of 1.50m (IPC) • Obstacles lower than 2.10m that protrude more higher up than below must be protected by guardrails or tactile flooring Low desk Max 30 Min 50 Min 90 Min 90 Min75 Min85 Min 60 Sales Service Dimensions in centimetres Tactile marks Figure 1.18
  31. 31. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 31 Tables and chairs (Figure 1.19): • Fixed seats must be avoided. If this is the only design option, they must alternate with mobile chairs • Accessible seats must be provided in several areas of the restaurant. They must be light and easy to move • Tables with four legs are preferable to tables with one central leg. In the case of tables with one central leg, the leg must be at least 0.50m from the external edge of the table top (IPC) • At least 20% of chairs must not have arms Bars: • In bars, at least 1.60m of the bar must be lower (IPC) • The maximum height must be 0.85m, with 0.75m of height free from obstacles beneath the bar (IPC) • All stools must have a backrest (IPC) Min 0.50 Min 1.00 Min 1.00 Ø1.50 Min0.73 0.75to0.85 Max 0.05 M in 1.60 Min 0.80 Ø1.50 Ø1.50 Dimensions in metres Min0.75 Max0.85 Figure 1.19
  32. 32. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201332 Menus: • At least one menu option must be offered on matte, high- contrast paper, in large letters, and other Braille options 1.5 Entrances • All entrances to sports and non-sports venues must be on accessible routes • The maximum distance between an accessible entrance and the other entrances must be 50m (IPC) 1.5.1 Public entrances • Avoid revolving doors. If this solution is essential, one must offer an alternative entrance near the main entrance (NBR 9,050/2004) • Indicative, informative and directional signage must be visible in all parts of entrances • Exit routes must be accessible and permit rapid evacuation (IPC) • Routes must be clear and well defined, with signage and orientation • All circulation spaces must be in contrasting colours, with a minimum width of 1.20m (CBMERJ Code), although the recommended width is 1.50m (IPC), as shown in the table in item 1.1 • All doors must be easy to use, with maximum force of 19.5 N (IPC) • Provide accessible transport near entrances, to guarantee easy access for people with disabilities • Every 30m along access routes, there must be waiting and rest areas, sheltered from the weather, if the distance between the queue and the entrance is long (IPC) Turnstiles (Figure 1.20): • To the side of turnstiles, there must be an accessible entrance with a minimum width of 0.90m, although 1.00m is recommended (consult articles 52 and 53 of the CBMERJ Code)
  33. 33. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 33 1.5.2 Doors Doors located along escape routes: consult the CBMERJ Code. Doors in circulation areas (Figure 1.21): We suggest using a minimum clearance of 0.98m, and 1.00m-door leaves for locations designated for sport practice (due to the sports wheelchairs used by athletes). One may tolerate minimum gaps of 0.85m and door leaves of 0.90m in cases where ideal dimensions cannot be provided (NBR 9,050/2004). Min 0.90 Accessible automatic turnstile Not accessible to people with disabilities Figure 1.20
  34. 34. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201334 In the case of double-leaf doors, at least one of the sides must have a minimum dimension of 1.00m (NBR 9,050/2004). • Article 54 of CBMERJ Decree 897 prohibits sliding doors at exits • Article 57 of CBMERJ Decree 897 specifies a minimum height of 2.20m for exit doors • Doors should preferably operate using a sensor, which should be adjusted to detect people of short stature and open completely in under three seconds (IPC) • Permit the interruption of its closing with a force smaller than 6 Kgf or 58 N (IPC) • Doors must be operated manually in the event of an emergency • The force exerted by a closing door must be less than 3.4 Kgf or 33 N (IPC) • Glass doors must be demarcated with a minimum strip of 5cm in a contrasting colour (IPC) Door handle 0.90to1.10m 0.40m Não Perturbe Impact-resistant protection Figure 1.21
  35. 35. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 35 • Warnings and signs must not be installed directly on doors • Door sills should be eliminated. If this solution is not possible, a maximum change in level of 0.5cm is tolerable. Changes in level of greater than 0.5cm, up to 1.5cm, must be treated in the form of a ramp, with a maximum inclination of 50% (NBR 9,050/2004) • The tracks of sliding doors must be installed on the upper lintel rather than on the floor (IPC) • When located along accessible routes, the lower part (up to 0.40m) of doors must be made of resistant material (NBR 9,050/2004) • In toilets, changing rooms, health posts and accessible rooms, a horizontal pull rail associated with the door handle, with a minimum dimension equal to half the width of the door, must be installed 10cm from the hinge • The horizontal pull rail should be installed on the internal side of the room/cubicle when the door opens outwards. Otherwise, the horizontal pull rail should be installed on the outside of the room/cubicle • Swing doors must not be installed in areas with large flows, as they need a translucent window with a minimum width of 0.20m (Figure 1.22), with its bottom edge installed at a height of between 0.40 and 0.90m from the floor and its top edge at a height of 1.50m (NBR 9,050/2004) • The controls on manually activated electronic doors must be positioned at a height of between 0.90 and 1.10m and at a distance of between 0.80 and 1.00m from the gap, in the case of sliding doors (NBR 9,050/2004) Spaces needed by people in wheelchairs in order to use doors (Figure 1.23): • Provide a clear space of 1.50 x 1.35m, 0.60m wide, next to the door, to enable wheelchairs to approach and manoeuvre (NBR 9,050/2004 and IPC requirements) • A minimum distance of 1.35m must be maintained between pivoting or hinged doors that are installed sequentially (IPC)
  36. 36. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201336 Min 1.35 Min1.35Min1.35 Min 1.50 Min 1.50 Min1.50 Min 0.50 Min 0.50 0.30 Widthofdoor Min1.35 Min 1.35 Min 1.20 Min 0.30 Free space Min 1.00 Min 0.30 Min 0.50 Min1.35 Dimensions in metres Min1.20 Figure 1.23 Min1.50 0.40to0.90 0.40 Min 0.20 Dimensions in metresFigure 1.22
  37. 37. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 37 Door handles must be (Figure 1.24): • easy to handle and require only a small effort to open • of the lever kind, with rounded edges (IPC) • installed at a height of between 0.90 and 1.10m (IPC) 1.6 Lifts • For facilities located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, consult the specific regulations of the Mechanical Engineering Unit (Gerência de Engenharia Mecânica, or GEM) • Lifts must be located along accessible routes, associated with stairs Floor signage: • All floors must have signs identifying the floor number in a contrasting colour immediately outside the lift, next to the door and above the lift buttons, with a minimum dimension of 50mm in high or low relief of 0.8mm, including Braille signs (NBR 13,994/2000) Sound devices: • For people inside the lift, the floors and the lift’s movement (up or down) must be announced • For people outside the lift, the arrival of the lift and its direction (up or down) must be announced (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) Figure 1.24 DO NOT USE DO NOT USE Min 12cm USE
  38. 38. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201338 Lift halls (Figure 1.25): • There must be a free space in front of the lift, if possible equipped with benches with a backrest • Lifts must comply with all the provisions of NBR-NM 313/2007, which establishes safety specifications to meet the specific accessibility needs of people with disabilities in the case of passenger lifts • All buildings, including their lifts and stairs, must comply with the Fire Safety Code (Cosip) Max0.85m Max1.20m Figure 1.25
  39. 39. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 39 1.6.1 Lift doors Door gaps (Figure 1.27): • For places where sports are played: minimum gap of 1.00 x 2.10m • For other locations: minimum gap of 0.95m (IPC) • Maximum change in floor level between lift and outside floor: 10mm • Minimum time for which the door must remain open: from 5 to 15 seconds (NBR 9,050/2004). A button may activate door closure before the determined period 1.6.2 Lift cabs Dimensions (Figure 1.26): • 1.10 x 1.40m: minimum dimensions for lifts for eight passengers • 1.73 x 1.30m: minimum dimensions for lifts for 13 passengers that permit a wheelchair to rotate • 1.70 x 1.50m: ideal in the case of low or medium flows (IPC) • 2.10 x 1.50m: ideal in the case of large flows of people (IPC) • It is necessary to respect the traffic calculation demanded by GEM Lighting inside lifts: • Minimum of 100 lux (IPC) Internal handrails: • A handrail with a diameter of 4.0 to 5.4cm must be installed along the whole perimeter of the cab, at a height of between 0.80 and 0.92m. A maximum height of 1.00m is permitted • The handrail must be able to bear a force of 700 N (NBR 13,994/2000) • The handrail must be rounded on the outside and it must contrast with the cab’s panels Floor: • The floor must have a rigid, anti-slip surface, avoiding dark surfaces (IPC) and in a colour that contrasts with the external floor (NBR 9,050/2004)
  40. 40. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201340 Figure 1.26 Min0.02m Min 0.95m 1.50m 1.70m 1.00 0.92m 0.25m Large numbers in relief and with corresponding Braille signs Floor indication Mirror Handrail d = 0.04 to 0.05m Max1.20m Max0.85m Max1.20m Min0.02m Information in Braille High-relief tactile information Min 1mm 5 Floor indication Sound alert Tactile warning marks Tactile directional marks Seats with back rest in lift hall Min 0.60 free Visual information in colour that contrasts with the background
  41. 41. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 41 1.6.3 Lift controls and commands Recommendations (Figure 1.27): • Consult the CBMERJ Code and obtain approval from GEM • The control panel must be located 0.25m from the entrance door (IPC) • The emergency button must be 0.85m from the floor (IPC) • The highest part of the panel must be no more than 1.20m from the floor (IPC) • There must be direct communication via speakerphone with the external area (IPC) • There must be visual and sound indications of the floor, direction of movement, and door opening and closing Dimensions of buttons: • Minimum diameter of 20mm for all buttons (IPC) • When being pushed, the depth may not exceed 5mm (NBR 9,050/2004) 1 2 3 S G P M 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 CANCEL CONFIRM - Screen Speakerphone Emergency commands 4.7mm Min 20mm 7.4mm Min16mm Max 5mm E Figure 1.27
  42. 42. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201342 • The buttons must be associated with voice recordings (NBR 9,050/2004) • The characters must have a minimum height of 16mm, high or low relief of 0.8mm and a colour that contrasts with the background (NBR 9,050/2004) • Braille signs must respect the dimension of 7.4 x 4.7mm for each cell, located immediately to the left of the corresponding button (NBR 9,050/2004) • Emergency commands must be located in the lower part of the panel (NBR 9,050/2004) Call logs: • Logs must be audiovisual, between 35 and 50 dBA, with a maximum frequency of 1500 Hz, 1m from the command (ABNT 13.994/1999) • A signal must be given each time a button is pressed • A system for communicating with the outside area must be installed inside the lift cab for use in the event of an emergency. This solution may feature a speakerphone activation button (ABNT 13.994/1999) • The intercom button must be marked using an international symbol for telephone, as well as the Braille sign 1.6.4 Escalators and other resources • Escalators and inclined moving walkways may not be considered integral parts of an accessible route. Vertical or inclined lift platforms and horizontal moving walkways are accepted, however. The front edges of escalator steps must be marked with tactile markings • The location must have minimum lighting of 60 to 200 lux (NBR 9,050/2004 and 13.994/1999) • Inclined moving walkways must have a maximum inclination of 5% (NBR 9,050/2004). In the case of moving walkways with an inclination greater than 5%, there must be visual signage informing people of the requirement for people in wheelchairs to be accompanied by an authorised person
  43. 43. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 43 Vertical lift platforms: • This kind of equipment is not ideal, as it must be activated by an authorised person • They must climb no more than 2.00m. Enclosed boxes may climb up to 9.00m (NBR 9,050/2004) • The guardrail of open lift platforms must be 1.10m high Inclined lift platforms: • There must be a programmed stop on landings or no less frequently than every 3.20m of change in height (NBR 9,050/2004) • They must have folding seats (NBR 9,050/2004) • They must have tactile and visual signage informing people of the requirement to be accompanied by an authorised person during their use (NBR 9,050/2004) 1.7 Emergency facilities 1.7.1 Emergency exits • Consult CBMERJ Decree 44,035 • Emergency exits must be located along an accessible route, with direct access to an external area • Take the emergency plan of the local fire brigade into consideration • Sound and visual alarms must be installed at emergency exits • Sound alarms and vibrating alarms must be associated and synchronised with intermittent visual alarms, to warn people with visual and hearing disabilities 1.7.2 Rescue areas • They must be demarcated and signposted on stair landings (Figure 1.28) • They must comply with the requirements of the Building Code, the CBMERJ Code and the Coscip Code • At least one reference module (known by Portuguese acronym MR) must be provided per floor and per set of emergency stairs (NBR 9,050/2004) • They must be located in an area protected by firewalls
  44. 44. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201344 • They must have equipment such as telephones and/or interphones with sound and visual alerts • They must be linked to the external area via an accessible route, although electromechanical equipment is not necessary • Escape routes in closed environments must be marked and lit with beacon devices • The access door to rescue areas must be identified with signage in photoluminescent material or it must be backlit • Instructions about the use of the rescue area in large, high- contrast letters, and in Braille, must be attached • They must be ventilated and located outside the main circulation flow • The whole of each building, including its lifts and stairs, must comply with Coscip requirements • They must be marked together with MR demarcation on the floor • Instructions about the use of the rescue area must be attached (NBR 9,050/2004) Interphone to call for help Max height 1.20 Stairs Space for wheelchair 0.80 x 1.20 Space for one wheelchair 0.80 x 1.20 Space for one wheelchair 0.80 x 1.20 0.60 Foyer Foyer 1.20 Up Dimensions in metres Figure 1.28
  45. 45. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 45 1.7.3 Alarms • Escape routes and emergency exits must be marked with associated visual and sound alarms • Maximum height of 1.20m for warning buttons and fire extinguishers (IPC) • On stairs that link different floors, including emergency stairs, next to the fire door, there must be tactile and visual signage informing people of the floor number. This signage may be installed on handrails • Emergency devices must present tactile signage using international symbols Sound alarms: • They must have an intensity and frequency between 500 and 3,000 Hz • The frequency may be variable if the environment has many sound obstacles, such as columns or beams Visual alarms: • They must have an intermittent appearance • Xenon light with strobe effect or equivalent • Minimum intensity of 75 candelas • Must be installed more than 2.20m above the floor or 0.15m lower in the case of lower ceilings • Must be installed no more than 15m apart from each other • May be spaced out further, up to a maximum distance of 30m, where there are no visual obstructions 1.7.4 First aid rooms First aid rooms must be connected to the main circulation area, in a strategic location with an outdoor area where an ambulance can park (Núcleo Pró-Acesso). They must have: • door with a minimum span of 1.00m • hospital trolleys with adjustable height (IPC) • at least one accessible toilet for each sex, or unisex
  46. 46. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201346 1.7.5 Evacuation instructions • Easy-to-understand evacuation instructions must be provided to everyone, printed on matte paper in a minimum font size of 14 pt • Provide tactile directional floor marks, indicating the nearest accessible route to get to the exit • Dim lighting installed near the floor (at a height of 0.48m) must be provided, functioning together with alarms • Automatic doors must always work, even if manually, in the event of an emergency
  47. 47. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 47 2.1 Grandstands Decree 7,823 of 9 October 2012 regulates the provisions of Law 10,048 of 8 November 2000 and Law 10,098 of 19 December 2000, in terms of the minimum allocation of spaces and seats at venues related to the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games. • In the construction, renovation or expansion of stadia, sports gyms and other venues to host or support the staging of 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games events, before or after the holding of these competitions, one will observe the allocation of a minimum of 1% of the total capacity of spaces and seats in stadia, sports gyms or other events for people with disabilities (Decree 7,823) • Spaces and seats must be situated in signposted locations with good visibility, guaranteeing the accommodation of at least one companion for each person with a disability (Decree 7,823) • Seats must be provided for people with reduced mobility (PRM: people with crutches or blind people with guide dog) and obese people (OP) • When the total number of seats is from 201 to 1,000, one should reserve 1% of the capacity for PRM and 1% for OP (NBR 9,050/2004) • When the capacity exceeds 1,000, one should reserve 10 seats plus 0.1% of the total which exceeds 1,000 for PRM and the same quantity for OP (NBR 9,050/2004) • We recommend consulting Accessible Stadia Guide no. 1 and the Green Guide – Football Licensing Authority – 5th version to produce architectural designs of stadia • The IPC suggests allocating 1% to 1.2% of all existing seats for people with disabilities, in accordance with the sport Sports venues 2
  48. 48. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201348 2.1.1 Seats • Accessible seats must be distributed in all building sectors (Figure 2.1), avoiding segregation and offering fans different location and ticket price options (IPC, NBR 9,050/2004, Accessible Stadiums – US Department of Justice and Green Guide) • All accessible seats must permit free lines of sight and the reception of sound messages without impediments • Exclusively in locations to which people in wheelchairs are designated, one must avoid railings, guardrails and sills exceeding 0.75m in height. In other cases, use guardrails 1.10m in height – 0. 75m up to the handrail and the rest made of transparent material that permits unimpeded views (Figure 2.2) • Adopt the reference module of NBR 9,050/2004, measuring 1.20 x 0.80m, including 0.30m behind this space • Locate seats in a manner that does not hamper or interfere with circulation (NBR 9,050/2004 and IPC requirements) • Connect these seats to entrances, changing rooms, toilets, courts and other presentation areas via accessible routes (NBR 9,050/2004) Figure 2.1
  49. 49. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 49 • Mark these locations with the International Symbol of Access (ISA) in both the seat locations (Figure 2.3) and along the routes that lead to them (Accessible Stadiums – US Department of Justice) • Take care to ensure that there are escape routes and emergency exits along the route that links these seats. To this end, consult the Fire Brigade’s Fire and Panic Safety Code (Coscip) • Consider priority seats with a height of between 0.41 and 0.45m, with a maximum floor inclination of 2% • For these seats, hinged arms must be provided in order to facilitate transferring people in wheelchairs • In cinemas or theatres, leave 0.60m of free space in front of seats for people with reduced mobility and obese people (NBR 9,050/2004) • For stadia, consult Accessible Stadia Guide no. 1 and the Green Guide – Football Licensing Authority – 5th version • Accessible seats must have articulated armrests Place reserved for person in a wheelchair Rear entry Max0.75m Place reserved for person in a wheelchair Side entry Absence of visual and sound barriers Figure 2.2
  50. 50. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201350 Spaces for guide dogs (Figure 2.4): • Provide a space designated for a guide dog (0.30m high x 0.40m wide x 0.70m long), to be located next to 1% of seats for preferential use by people with reduced mobility Seats for obese people (Figure 2.4): • Height of seats: between 0.44 and 0.48m • Height of articulated arms: between 0.65 and 0.69m • Structure to support at least 250 kg • Seat width: between0.60 to 0.70 m • Seat depth: between 0.47 to 0.51 m Seats for companions (Figure 2.4): • Locate seats for companions alternately with spaces for people in wheelchairs and seats for preferential use by people with reduced mobility 0.80 0.80 0.300.30 1.201.20 Min0.60 Max 2% i Mark place with the International Symbol of Access and along route leading to it Dimensions in metres Figure 2.3
  51. 51. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 51 Removable benches: • This is an alternative solution for the case of Paralympic events, for example. One must strive for the quality of the material and equipment to be used Provision for companion’s seat Low guardrail without hindering spectators’ views Space for guide dog Max75 Articulated arms 65to69 41to45 30 70 40 Seat for obese people bears up to 250 kg Accessible seat with articulated armrest Min6047to51 Dimensions in centimetres Signal accessible seats with International Symbol of Access and along the route leading to them Min 60 Max 70 Min47 Max.51 Min 60 Max 70 Figure 2.4
  52. 52. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201352 2.1.2 Lines of sight The line-of-sight calculation takes into consideration a series of factors and depends on the surface of the field of play (Figure 2.5). Accordingly, each stadium will require a separate calculation (Accessible Stadia Guide): C = D (N +R) - R D + T Where: C ≥ 9cm, corresponding to the vertical distance from the line of the eyes of spectators who are watching the game on foot to the level of the eyes of the spectators who are in the row behind. This measure may be less than 9cm, in line with the stadium design D = horizontal distance from the eyes to the focal point in the field of play (considering the view of the whole field) N = height of the level where the accessible seats will be R = vertical height to the focal point T = depth of the row of seats • It is recommended for the height of guardrails situated in front of the reference module not to exceed 0.75m (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) • High balls must be visible up to a height of at least 12.00m (Figure 2.6) • For architectural designs of stadia and sports arenas, we suggest consulting the Football Licensing Authority (FLA)’s Green Guide, 5th version
  53. 53. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 53 Max75cm C R (Vertical height to focal point) T Depth of row of seats N (Height of landing) D Horizontal distance to focal point High balls must be visible up to at least 12m in height Figure 2.5 Figure 2.6
  54. 54. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201354 2.2 Toilets • If a building does not have accessible toilets, even if the other accessibility conditions are met, the building may not be considered accessible (IPC) • The distance to be travelled between the accessible toilets and the sectors with accessible seating must not exceed 50m Quantification: • The share of toilets that are accessible must be at least 5% (NBR 9,050/2004) • Specially for the Paralympic Games, accessible toilets must be supplied at a ratio of 1:15 – in other words, one accessible toilet for every 15 clients who need this type of facility (IPC) Unisex or family accessible toilets (Figure 2.7): • Whenever possible, install “family or unisex” accessible toilets (NBR 9,050/2004) with an entrance that is independent from other toilets • In addition to the measures stipulated in standards, these toilets must contain a bench where people can change clothes, with the following minimum dimensions: width = 0.80m; height = between 0.44 and 0.48m; and length = 1.80m (NBR 9,050/2004) • At each sports venue, there must be an extra accessible toilet with minimum dimensions of 3.00 x 3.00m, as well as a trolley and lift-style manual transfer device. This toilet’s location must be identified on all the doors of the other accessible toilets Toilets for children or people of short stature: • Whenever possible, they must be installed when the building’s toilet calculations point to a number of more than five toilets per sex on each floor Nappy change areas: • The minimum nappy change surface area must be 0.75 x 0.50m, with a height of 0.85m in relation to the finished floor
  55. 55. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 55 1.50 2.80 Min 1.20 Min0.80 360° rotation Ø1.50 Min0.85 Figure 2.7a Transfer area Dimensions in metres Support bars to transfer person with a disability Accessories placed in area reachable by users Base to adjust toilet to ideal transfer height Flush activated by a single command
  56. 56. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201356 2.2.1 Toilet and changing room signage • Toilets must be signposted and identified in Portuguese and English, combined with graphic symbols (Figure 2.8) • Emergency warnings must feature a light and sound device inside the toilets (For more details, see item 5.1.9) Transfer area Min 3.00 Transfer area Min 1.70 Min1.00 Min1.50 Min3.00 Manoeuvre area Toilet Toilet Min0.85 180° rotation 1.50 x 1.20 Dimensions in metres Figure 2.7b
  57. 57. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 57 2.2.2 Toilet doors, entrances and manoeuvre areas • It is recommended that accessible toilets have an entrance that is independent from the other toilets, and that they be distributed in all sectors of buildings • Toilet doors must have signage in contrasting colours (IPC) • Door handles must be of the lever variety (Figure 2.9) and have rounded edges. It must be possible to use them with a force of less than 20 N. To lock the door from the inside, use sliding latches, never rotating latches (IPC) • At sports venues, one must adopt measures that take account of sports wheelchairs. In other words, the doors giving access to changing rooms and toilets need to have a clear space measuring 1.00m across Information in Braille (Portuguese and English) Protection against impacts 0.40m 1.35m mulher woman Visual information in colour contrasting with background High-relief tactile information Min 1mm Figure 2.8 DO NOT USE DO NOT USE Min 12cm USE Figure 2.9a
  58. 58. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201358 Min 1.20 Min0.80 360° rotation Ø1.50 Min0.85 Lever-style handle Min 0.40 Sliding latch Door viewed from inside cubicle 0.90to1.10 Door viewed from outside cubicle Protection against impacts Dimensions in metres Horizontal pull rails: • Drawer-style horizontal pull rails must be installed inside doors when they open outwards, 10cm from the hinge, attached at the same height as the handle and half as long as the door’s width Figure 2.10 Figure 2.9b
  59. 59. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 59 Luminous signage: • Luminous signs, where they exist, must be associated with the door-locking option 2.2.3 Toilet cubicles Accessible toilet cubicles must have minimum measurements of 1.70 x 1.50m (Figures 2.7b and 2.10), and they must have the following: • An area free from obstacles next to the toilet bowl, measuring at least 0.80 x 1.20m (NBR 9,050/2004) • A space for turning around inside the toilet cubicle, with a diameter of 1.50m (NBR 9,050/2004) • In the case of existing toilets, where it is not possible to allocate a turning area, it is tolerable for this manoeuvre to take place outside the cubicle. In this case, the external space required is 1.50 x 1.20m (NBR 9,050/2004) 2.2.4 Washbasins (Figure 2.11) • Height of top surface of basin or counter: between 0.78 and 0.80m (NBR 9,050/2004) • Free space at least 0.73m in height between the finished floor and the inside of the washbasin (NBR 9,050/2004) • Horizontal space of at least 0.25m beneath the counter (NBR 9,050/2004) • A support counter adjacent to the washbasin is recommended (IPC) Taps: • Ideally, taps should be activated by electronic sensors or they should be lever-type taps (NBR 9,050/2004 and IPC requirements) • Mono mixer taps are an excellent type of mixer tap (NBR 9,050/2004 and IPC requirements) • Taps must be positioned no more than 0.50m from the front edge of the washbasin (NBR 9,050/2004)
  60. 60. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201360 Washbasin accessories: • The soap and paper towel dispensers must be less than 0.50m from the sink’s central axis, to both sides, and between 0.80 and 1.20m above the floor (NBR 9,050/2004) • Other accessories, such as coat hooks, miscellaneous object holders and rubbish bins, may be installed outside this zone 0.50m from the axis, but within a height of 0.80 to 1.20m above the floor • It is recommended that paper towel dispensers be activated by electronic sensors Figure 2.11a Approach area Soap dispenser Socket 0.80to1.20 Min 0.25 0.40to1.00 1.200.80 Max 0.50 Paper towel dispenser Max 0.50 Max 0.50 10o Dimensions in metres Mono mixer tap Min0.73 0.78to0.80 Max1.10 0.80to1.20 Min1.80
  61. 61. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 61 Mirrors: • In the case of mirrors inclined at an angle of 10°, the maximum height of the lower edge must be 1.10m, and the minimum height of the upper edge position is 1.80m • In the case of vertically installed mirrors, the maximum height of the lower edge must be 0.90m and the minimum height of the upper edge is 1.80m Sockets: • We recommend installing sockets in toilets near the sinks • Electrical sockets must be capable of receiving several different types of plugs. We recommend universal sockets at a minimum height of 0.40m and a maximum height of 1.20m Figure 2.11b Support bar 03xaM M in 4 3 to 4 Min73 78to80 Support counter Dimensions in centimetres Vertically installed mirror
  62. 62. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201362 2.2.5 Toilet bowls • Accessible toilet bowls may not have a front opening • In the case of facilities equipped with toilet bowls with front openings, we recommend replacing them • Leave a clear space of 0.80 x 1.20m to the side of toilets, for transfer purposes (NBR 9,050/2004) • Height of toilets: 0.46m, including the seat (NBR 9,050/2004 and IPC requirements) • If there is no lid to serve as a backrest, a resistant, smooth artefact must be built for this purpose (IPC) • Automatic flush is the best solution (IPC). However, if this is not possible, manual flushes must be easy to activate, using a force of less than 23 N (NBR 9,050/2004) • The flush button must be 1.00m up from the finished floor 2.2.6 Support bars in toilets • Support bars must be firmly attached and able to bear a minimum force of 1.5 KN (NBR 9,050/2004) • They must be made from resistant material and they must not be able to interfere with the transfer area • There must be a 40cm distance between the central axis of the toilet bowl and the side bar (NBR 9,050/2004 and IPC requirements) • The height of the horizontal bar must be 75cm in relation to the finished floor (NBR 9,050/2004) To install bars next to conventional toilets, where there is a side wall, follow Figure 2.12. To install bars next to conventional toilets, where there is no side wall, follow Figure 2.13.
  63. 63. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 63 Min 80 Min 30 Withseat C Top view Right side view Left side viewFront view Min 70 Min70A B A D Top view Right side view Left side viewFront view Min 80 10 to 25 Withseat A D A B C Distances Adult A 75cm B 40cm C 46cm D 30cm Distances Adult A 75cm B 40cm C 46cm D 30cm Figure 2.12 Figure 2.13 Bars for conventional toilet basins
  64. 64. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201364 Withseat Top view Right side view Left side viewFront view A C A BB 10 to 2510 to 25 Withseat Top view Right side view Left side viewFront view Min 70 30 Min70 B A C A B 10 to 25 Distances Adult A 75cm B 40cm C 46cm D 65cm Distances Adult A 75cm B 40cm C 46cm Figure 2.14 Figure 2.15 Bars for attached toilet basins
  65. 65. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 65 To install bars next to close-coupled toilets, following Figures 2.14 and 2.15. • Bars must have a diameter of between 3.0 and 4.5cm and rounded edges (NBR 9,050/2004) • Bars must be 5.0cm from the wall or partitions to which they are attached (NBR 9,050/2004) • In order to guarantee the safety of users, hinged bars may not permit abrupt movements 2.2.7 Accessories for accessible toilet cubicles (Figure 2.16) Toilet paper holder: • Built-in toilet paper holders must be attached at a height of 0.55m in relation to the finished floor. They must be placed at a maximum distance of 0.20m from the front rim of the toilet (NBR 9,050/2004) • Toilet paper holders that are not built in must be attached at a height of 1.00m above the finished floor, aligned with the front rim of the toilet Figure 2.16 0.44to0.46 Coat hook Toilet paper dispenser, not built in Built-in toilet paper dispenser Dimensions in metres 0.80 0.55 1.00 1.00 Max 0.20 flush activated with single movement
  66. 66. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201366 Coat hooks and miscellaneous object holders: • A coat hook must be installed next to washbasins, shower cubicles, changing room benches, changing booths and toilet cubicles, at a height of 0.80m above the finished floor • A miscellaneous object holder must be installed next to washbasins, urinals and toilets, at a height of between 0.80 and 1.20m, with a maximum depth of 0.25m, in a place that does not interfere with transfer and manoeuvre areas or the use of support bars • Object holders and hooks must not have sharp corners or surfaces that are abrasive or that could cut people 2.2.8 Bathtubs (Figure 2.17) • Bathtubs, bathtub platforms, bathtub edges and the bottom of bathtubs must be made of anti-slip material, although it must not be too abrasive • There must be a lateral transfer area (0.80 x 1.20m), offset 0.30m from the rear limit of the seat (NBR 9,050/2004) • The height of the platform and bathtub aligned with the wheelchair must be no more than 0.45m above the finished floor (NBR 9,050/2004) Vertical and horizontal support bars: • The vertical bars must measure 70cm in length and they must be located on the wall adjacent to the transfer platform, aligned with the outside edge of the bathtub, at a height of 10cm above the platform • The horizontal bars must measure at least 80cm. They must be attached respectively at a height of 10 and 30cm in relation to the upper edge of the bathtub. The lower bar must be 10cm in front of the upper bar Taps: • The bathtub’s taps and mixer mechanisms must be easy to handle, with a lever-type arrangement, preferably a mono mixer (NBR 9,050/2004 and IPC requirements)
  67. 67. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 67 Devices: • Install an emergency device next to bathtubs and shower cubicles to be activated in the event of a fall. This signalling device must be attached at a height of 40cm above the finished floor (NBR 9,050/2004) • Install a thermostatic control valve in bathtubs (IPC) 2.2.9 Urinals • The urinal approach area (Figure 2.18) must correspond to the reference module of 0.80 x 1.20m (NBR 9,050/2004) 0.30 0.80 1.20 0.30 0.30 0.100.70 Min 0.80 0.40 Fixed platform with anti-slip coating Transfer area Transfer area 0.80 x 1.20 Emergency button 0.100.20 0.20 0.45 Dimensions in metres Figure 2.17
  68. 68. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201368 • One should favour wall and floor urinals. However, if suspended urinals are used, they must be installed at a height of between 0.60 and 0.65m from the urinal’s axis, counting from the finished floor • If there is a flush mechanism, if must be easy to handle and positioned 1.00m to 1.10m above the finished floor. We recommend flushes operated by optical sensors or with lever mechanisms • Where there are individual urinals, at least one must be equipped with support bars. We recommend locating them closest to the entrance door • Support bars at a height of 0.75m above the finished floor, with a minimum length of 0.70m, situated on both sides of the urinal, with a 0.60m space between themselves and centralised in relation to the urinal’s axis • We recommend that urinals be of a colour that contrasts with the wall on which they are installed 0.30 0.30 07.0niM57.0 01.1ot00.1 56.0ot06.0 Approach area 0.80 1.20 Dimensions in metres Figure 2.18
  69. 69. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 69 2.3 Changing rooms • At sports venues, one must provide accessible changing rooms for athletes, judges, coaches, staff and medical professionals • If possible, in addition to changing rooms for both sexes, provide for the inclusion of a unisex changing booth with an entrance that is independent from the other changing rooms, integrated with the shower units and equipped with toilets • The changing rooms’ benches must have a minimum depth of 0.45m, a height of 0.46m and a backrest. The benches must provide a free space of 0.30m underneath them Lockers (Figure 2.19): • They must be capable of storing wheelchairs • They must be situated at a height of between 0.40 and 1.20m above the finished floor. Their handles must be located in a range between 0.80 and 1.20m above the floor • Their shelves must have an ergonomic depth, making it possible to see and move the belongings to be stored in the lockers • The locker doors, when open, must not interfere with the manoeuver area of wheelchairs with a diameter of 1.50m Min 0.45 Min1.90 Min0.80 Max1.20 1.50 1.50 Min0.40 Max1.20 Min 0.45 Min0.30 Between0.44and0.48 Min0.30 Dimensions in metres Figure 2.19
  70. 70. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201370 Reserved changing room cubicles (Figure 2.20): • The minimum dimensions of cubicles must be 1.80 x 1.80m • The cubicles must contain a horizontal surface for people to get changed on, at least 1.80m long, 0.70m wide and 0.46m in height, respecting the transfer area and free reference module (0.80 x 1.20m). They must also have support bars (NBR 9,050/2004) • The support bars must be attached to the wall, next to the horizontal surface for getting changed, at a height of 0.75m above the finished floor. One of the bars must be at the front, 0.30m from the side wall, and the other must be on the side wall, 0.40m from the front wall (NBR 9,050/2004) Mirrors: • Bottom edge no more than 0.30m above the floor • Top edge at least 1.80m above the floor (NBR 9,050/2004), although 1.90m is recommended 0.70 0.46 0.30 0.40 Min1.80 Min0.30 Min1.80 1.50 0.75 Max1.20 Min0.80 Dimensions in metres Figure 2.20
  71. 71. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 71 Coat rails/hooks: • Installed at a height of between 0.80 and 1.20m above the finished floor (NBR 9,050/2004) 2.3.1 Shower stalls and cubicles (Figure 2.21) • Accessible shower stalls must have a horizontal surface for changing clothes • The transfer area must measure 0.80 x 1.20m, including a 0.30m space in addition to an extension of the shower wall, so that the wheelchair rest can be aligned with the head of the shower seat (NBR 9,050/2004) • The minimum dimensions of the shower’s wet area must be 0.90 x 0.95m (NBR 9,050/2004) • Maintain a foldable shower seat made of impact-resistant material, with rounded edges and an anti-slip, waterproof surface, and capable of bearing a force of at least 1.5 KN (NBR 9,050/2004) • The seat must be 0.40m deep and 0.45m wide (NBR 9,050/2004) • The seat’s height must be 0.46m (NBR 9,050/2004). This height refers to the distance between the floor where one will place the wheelchair for the transfer and the surface of the shower seat, rather than the shower’s wet floor • Maximum change in height of 0.50cm (NBR 9,050/2004) • Cubicle equipped with a manually operated shower installed 0.30m from the wall to which the seat is attached and 1.00m above the finished floor (NBR 9,050/2004) • The manually operated shower hose must have a minimum length of 1.50m (IPC) • Lever-operated mono mixer taps, located in a band between 0.75 and 1.00m above the finished floor (IPC) • It is important to equip showers with a thermostatic control valve • The seat must be firmly attached in order to bear a force of 1.5 KN. It must be made of resistant material and it must not be slippery to the touch (NBR 9,050/2004) • Vertical bar attached 0.75m above the finished floor with a minimum length of 0.70m, placed 0.45m from the front edge of the seat and in line with the end of the transfer area
  72. 72. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201372 • Horizontal bar with a minimum length of 0.60m, positioned at a height of 0.75m above the finished floor and at a maximum distance of 0.20m from the wall to which the seat is attached. An L-shaped bar is acceptable to replace the vertical and horizontal bars, measuring at least 0.70m in length and attached at a height of 0.75m above the finished floor. Its vertical segment must be 0.45m from the front edge of the seat Figure 2.21 Transfer area Dimensions in metres 0.30 0.50 0.85 Min0.70 0.75 1.00 1.20 0.80 Min0.95 0.85 Min 0.70 0.55 0.30 Min0.70 0.300.44to0.48 0.400.40
  73. 73. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 73 • Buildings designated as accommodation locations must comply with NBR 9,050/2004, whether in the Athletes’ Village, in the Media Villages or at other facilities, whether or not related to sport, such as hotels, apart-hotels and accommodation in general. Consequently, at least 5% of bedrooms must be accessible and 10% must be adaptable. All of these bedrooms must be located along accessible routes • Adaptable bedrooms are understood to be those whose apartment and toilet doors have a minimum free width of 0.80m and whose internal space meets the specifications of this technical document, but which do not have accessories installed in them (Figure 3.1) • We recommend having accessible bedrooms on the lowest floors, to facilitate fast exits in the event of an emergency. However, such units must not represent all the bedrooms, as it is necessary to offer different options to all guests, whether in terms of floor, building sector or views from the windows (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) • We emphasise that adopting universal design principles and solutions to accommodate any person in all rooms is preferable to merely designating a certain number of accessible rooms (IPC) Accommodation 3
  74. 74. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201374 • Bedrooms must be equipped with communication and guidance systems to cater to everyone, including people with sensory disabilities or reduced mobility (Decree 5,296/2004, UN Convention and NBR 9,050/2004) • Equipment and furniture must be accessible (Decree 5,296/2004 and NBR 9,050/2004) • Clients with visual disabilities must also be orientated as to the position of furniture and available facilities, when staying unaccompanied (IPC) 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.95 0.70 1.20 1.20 0.30 Min 0.90 1.50 1.50 1.50 Dimensions in metresFigure 3.1
  75. 75. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 75 3.1 Accessible bedrooms • Accessible bedrooms must be distributed around buildings in different modalities, both to offer different price options and to enable the full range of individual difficulties and preferences to be catered to (Figure 3.2) • There must be accessible bedrooms on the lowest floors, to facilitate fast exits in the event of an emergency. However, such units must not represent all the bedrooms • Accessible bedrooms must have internal circulation spaces that permit good mobility for people in wheelchairs • In addition, the edges of furniture must be rounded, the carpet must be stuck directly to the floor slab and it must not be too soft • Avoid shaggy rugs (Núcleo Pró-Acesso). Carpets must be made of low, high-density closed loops and adhered directly to the floor 0.90m 1.50m 1.20m Figure 3.2
  76. 76. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201376 3.1.1 Doors Accommodation doors width recommendations (Figure 3.3): • Minimum width of 1.00m in locations designated for sports practice, due to athletes’ use of sports wheelchairs (NBR 9,050/2004) • In the case of locations not designated for athletes, a minimum door width of 0.80m is tolerated (NBR 9,050/2004), although 0.90m is preferable (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) • In the case of double-leaf doors, at least one of the doors must allow clearance of 0.80m (NBR 9,050/2004), although 0.90m is preferable (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) Handle 0.90to1.10m 0.40m Impact-resistant protection Não Perturbe Figure 3.3
  77. 77. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 77 Doors opening: • In this space, there must be clearance of 0.60m next to the door (Figure 3.4), near the handle, enabling someone in a wheelchair to approach and reach the handle (NBR and IPC requirements) • The main accommodation door should preferably open inwards, provided that there is an internal space adjacent to the door measuring at least 1.20 x 1.20m (preferably 1.50 x 1.50m), to permit wheelchair manoeuvres (Figure 3.5) Door-opening recommendations: • A minimum circulation area must be provided to enable good mobility for people in wheelchairs, allowing them to open doors and use door handles • A minimum distance of 1.35m must be maintained between pivoting or hinged doors that are installed sequentially (IPC) • If it is not possible to allocate an internal space with the specifications stated above, the bedroom door must open outwards, where there must be a manoeuvring space with a minimum radius of 1.50m and safe conditions so that when the door is opened into the corridor, no risks are posed to people circulating in it (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) • In accommodation designated for athletes, the minimum clearance to allow the passage of people in sports wheelchairs must be 1.00m (Núcleo Pró-Acesso), although a difference of up to 0.15m in relation to the established minimum may be tolerated • Door sills should be eliminated. If this solution is not possible, a maximum change in level of 1.30cm is tolerable (IPC)
  78. 78. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201378 Outside of roomMin 0.50m Inside of room Min 1.50 Min1.35 Widthofdoor Clearance Min 1.00 Min1.50 Min 1.35 Min 1.50 Min 0.50 Min1.35 Min 1.35 Min 1.20 Min 0.30 Min 0.30 Min 0.50 Min1.35 Min1.20 Dimensions in metres Min 0.50 0.30 Min1.35 Figure 3.4 Figure 3.5
  79. 79. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 79 Balconies: • In the case of balconies, the tracks of sliding doors must be installed on the upper lintel rather than on the floor (IPC). The balcony floor must be flush with the bedroom floor (NBR 9,050/2004). Balcony doors must meet the same specifications as entrance doors in terms of their span and limits of reach Door handles, latches and locks: • Door handles must be easy to handle and require only a small effort to open (Figure 3.6). They must be of the lever variety, with rounded edges (IPC), and installed at a height of between 0.90 and 1.10m (IPC) • Doorknobs must not be used (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) • Automatic door latches must be adjusted to guarantee maximum force of 19.5 N (NBR 9,050/2004) • Conventional door latches must be replaced by slow-action or low-resistance latches (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) • Safety chains, locks and other devices must not demand dexterity from users, and it must be possible to operate them using just one hand. They must be installed at a height of no more than 1.20m (IPC) Figure 3.6 DO NOT USE DO NOT USE Min 12cm USE
  80. 80. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201380 3.1.2 Commands and controls • Controls and switches, including for heaters or air conditioning units, must be positioned at a height of between 0.80 and 1.20m above the finished floor (IPC) • Sockets and connectors must be at a maximum height of 0.45m above the finished floor (IPC) • There must be a general light switch next to the bed, as well as bedside lamps • Switches must be next to the bed, as well as controls for the television, air conditioning (Figure 3.7) and communication systems such as interphones and telephones (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) Between0.80and1.20m Figure 3.7
  81. 81. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 81 3.1.3 Equipment • Accommodation must have at least one telephone that can be reached by someone lying on the bed (IPC) • Radio-clocks must have a large, high-contrast display (IPC) • Telephones must be compatible with specific devices so that they can be used by people with hearing disabilities. They must also have a message display (IPC) • There must be a telephone with a 0.60m wire installed in the toilet for use in the event of an emergency (NBR 9,050/2004) • Televisions must be equipped with a remote control and closed captions (IPC) • When there are plans for telephone, interphones or similar devices, they must be equipped with a light signal and sound volume control (NBR 9,050/2004) • Emergency signalling and alarm devices that feature light as well as sound signals must be installed Also consider the determinations regarding lifts, alarms, emergency exits and other facilities referred to in items 1.6. and 1.7. for the area outside each bedroom. 3.1.4 Wardrobes (Figure 3.8): • There must be a 1.50m manoeuver space in front of wardrobes (IPC) • Coat rack must be installed at a maximum height of 1.20m (IPC) • At least one wardrobe must have a rod with two heights. As an alternative, pull-down wardrobe rails are advisable • Wardrobes must be equipped with clothes hangers that are easy to use and remove (IPC). Hangers attached to wardrobe poles with rings must not be used • Wardrobes must be well lit (IPC) • Wardrobe doors must be equipped with accessible locks, preferably of the lever kind • Wardrobes must be installed between 0.40 and 1.20m above the finished floor (NBR 9,050/2004) • Handles and locks must be attached at a height of between 0.80 and 1.20m above the finished floor (NBR 9,050/2004)
  82. 82. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201382 Pull-down wardrobe rails Internal lighting 0.40 1.50 1.20 1.20 1,50 0.80 Dimensions in metres Dimensions in metres 1.50 Pull-down wardrobe rails Internal lighting 0.40 1.50 1.20 1.20 1,50 0.80 Dimensions in metres Dimensions in metres 1.50 3.1.5 Windows • The furniture layout must enable people in wheelchairs to access the windows and curtains (Figure 3.9), operated by cords that must not exceed 1.20m in height (IPC) • The height of windowsills must permit good external visibility for people of short stature or people in wheelchairs, and so it must not exceed 0.80m (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) Figure 3.8 Figure 3.9
  83. 83. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 83 3.1.6 Furnishings Furniture: • All people must be able to see and handle the furniture used in accommodation, considering the technical specifications presented in NBR 9,050/2004. Furniture must not block passages and circulation spaces • Equipment such as air conditioning units, bedside lamps, radio-clocks, etc., must be activated by just one touch • At the bottom of bedside tables, there must be a free space 22.5cm high and 30cm deep (IPC) • All sideboards must have rounded edges and a maximum height of 0.85m above the finished floor, with minimum lower clearance of 0.73m (NBR 9,050/2004) Mirrors: • There must be at least one mirror whose bottom edge is at least 0.30m above the floor and whose top edge is at a height that allows a person standing up to see himself/herself • When a mirror is installed in vertical position, the height of the bottom edge must be no more than 0.90m (NBR 9,050/2004) and the top edge must be at least 1.80m above the floor • When a mirror is angled at 10° in relation to the vertical plane, the height of the bottom edge must be no more than 1.10m and the top edge must be at least 1.80m above the finished floor (NBR 9,050/2004) 3.1.7 Beds • Beds must be accessible (Figure 3.10) and the space around them must permit good circulation of people in wheelchairs or people using equipment for their mobility, such as walking frames (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) • A strip at least 0.90m wide must be preserved along the side of beds (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) • Beds with a frame must have a space 0.20m high by 0.15m deep below them, permitting the pedals of wheelchairs to go under them (IPC)
  84. 84. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201384 • Beds on a fixed base without a space between the floor and their structure are not recommended • The height of the bed’s mattress (top surface) must be between 0.44 and 0.48m above the finished floor (NBR 9,050/2004) 84ot44 02niM .15 15 22.5 Dimensions in centimetres 30 3.1.8 Bathrooms • In lodgings and hotels, the number of bedrooms with accessible bathrooms must be larger than the minimum necessary number of accessible bedrooms • General lighting inside bathrooms must be 30 lux and the lighting around the washbasin must be at least 70 lux For more details about bathrooms, consult item 2.2. Washbasins: • The height of the top surface of the basin or counter must be between 0.78 and 0.80m (Figure 3.11) • Taps must be positioned no more than 0.50m from the front edge of the washbasin (NBR 9,050/2004) Figure 3.10
  85. 85. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 85 • The free space under the counter or basin must be at least 0.73m high • The horizontal clear space under the counter or basin must measure at least 0.25m • Basins must have a support bar (NBR 9,050/2004) Taps: • Taps must be easy to handle and reach (Núcleo Pró-Acesso, IPC and NBR 9,050/2004) • One should favour taps activated by electronic sensors or lever-type taps, which require little force to operate them (IPC and NBR 9,050/2004) • One should favour mono mixer taps to mix hot and cold water (IPC and NBR 9,050/2004) Figure 3.11 Support bar 03xaM M in 4 3 to 4 Min73 78to80 Support counter Dimensions in centimetres Vertically installed mirror
  86. 86. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201386 Washbasin accessories: • Accessories must be less than 0.50m from the sink’s central axis (Figure 3.12), to both sides, and between 0.80 and 1.20m above the finished floor • Other accessories, such as coat hooks, miscellaneous object holders and rubbish bins, may be installed outside this 0.50m zone Washbasin support bars: • The width of the support bar must be between 3.0 and 4.5cm • The bar must be 5.0cm from the edge of the washbasin Bathroom mirrors: • In the case of mirrors inclined at an angle of 10°, the maximum height of the lower edge must be 1.00m, and the minimum height of the upper edge position is 1.90m (Núcleo Pró-Acesso) • In the case of vertically installed mirrors, the maximum height of the lower edge is 0.90m Sockets: • Electrical sockets must be universal, i.e. capable of receiving several types of plugs • Sockets must be positioned between 0.40 and 1.20m above the floor
  87. 87. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 87 Figure 3.12 Approach area Soap dispenser Socket 0.80to1.20 Min 0.25 0.40to1.00 1.200.80 Max 0.50 Paper towel dispenser Max 0.50 Max 0.50 10o Dimensions in metres Mono mixer tap Min0.73 0.78to0.80 Max1.10 0.80to1.20 Min1.80
  88. 88. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201388 Support bars in toilets: • Support bars must be firmly attached (Figure 3.13) to withstand a force of at least 1.5 KN (NBR). They must be made of resistant material that is not slippery to the touch, and they must not be able to interfere with the transfer area • There must be a 0.40m distance between the toilet and the side bar (NBR 9,050/2004 and IPC requirements) • The horizontal bar must be between 0.75 and 0.80m above the finished floor (NBR 9,050/2004) • The length of the bar in relation to the front rim of the toilet must be 0.50m • The bar’s diameter must be between 3.0 and 4.5cm and it must be 5.0cm from the wall. The support behind the toilet must follow the measures proposed by NBR 9,050/2004: length of 20cm to each side beyond the edges of the toilet • The toilet must have a backrest or specially built device. One may use the lid as a backrest, but it must be smooth and resistant (IPC), as described in item 2.2.6 • If it is impossible to attach the support bars firmly and securely (for example, where partition walls are made of weak material), NBR 9,050/2004 allows for the installation of side bars that are hinged or fixed to the floor, provided that the safety standards and dimensions specified above are respected Accessories for accessible toilet cubicles: Toilet paper holders: • They must be attached at a height of between 0.50 and 0.60m above the finished floor and located at a maximum distance of 0.15m from the front rim of the toilet (NBR 9,050/2004) • Toilet paper holders that are not built in must be attached at a height of between 1.00 and 1.20m above the finished floor, located 0.15m from the front rim of the toilet Coat hooks and miscellaneous object holders: • Must be installed between 1.00 and 1.20m above the finished floor (NBR 9,050/2004)
  89. 89. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 89 3.1.9 Showers • Accessible showers (Figure 3.14) must be equipped with curtains rather than doors (IPC) • The transfer area must be 0.80 x 1.20m • Minimum dimensions of the shower’s wet area: 0.95 x 0.90m • One must maintain a foldable, waterproof shower seat capable of bearing a force of at least 1.5 KN (NBR 9,050/2004) • Seat dimensions: 0.45m deep, 0.70m wide and 0.44 to 0.48m high (NBR 9,050/2004) • The floor’s inclination to drain away the shower water must have a maximum difference in level of 1.50cm (NBR 9,050/2004) • The shower cubicle must be equipped with a manually operated shower installed 0.30m from the wall to which the seat is attached and 1.00m above the finished floor • Minimum length of manually operated shower hose: 1.50m (NBR 9,050/2004) • Lever-operated mono mixer taps, located in a band between 0.75 and 1.00m above the finished floor • Thermostatic control valve with an emergency device recommended by NBR 9,050/2004, to be installed 0.40m above the finished floor • Support bars with the capacity to bear a force of 1.5 KN, made of resistant material that is not slippery to the touch 0.44to0.46 Coat hook Toilet paper dispenser, not built in Built-in toilet paper dispenser Dimensions in metres 0.80 0.55 1.00 1.00 Max 0.20 flush activated with single movement Figure 3.13
  90. 90. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201390 • Height of support bar: 0.75m above the floor (NBR 9,050/2004) • Vertical bar attached 0.75m above the finished floor, with a minimum length of 0.70m, placed 0.45m from the front edge of the seat and in line with the end of the transfer area • Horizontal bar on the wall to the side of the seat (opposite the transfer area), no more than 0.85m from the transfer area • An L-shaped bar is acceptable to replace the vertical and horizontal bars, measuring at least 0.70m in length and attached at a height of 0.75m above the finished floor. Its horizontal segment must be 0.45m from the front edge of the seat • It is important to equip the shower with a thermostatic control valve Transfer area Dimensions in metres 0.30 0.50 0.85 Min0.70 0.75 1.00 1.20 0.80 Min0.95 0.85 Min 0.70 0.55 0.30 Min0.70 0.300.44to0.48 0.400.40 Figure 3.14
  91. 91. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 91 3.1.10 Bathtubs • Bathtubs, bathtub platforms, bathtub edges and the bottom of bathtubs must be made of anti-slip material, although it must not be too abrasive (Figure 3.15) • There must be a lateral transfer area (0.80 x 1.20m), offset 0.30m from the rear limit of the seat (NBR 9,050/2004) • Height of the platform and bathtub aligned with the wheelchair: between 0.44 and 0.48m (NBR 9,050/2004) • The platform must be flush against a wall (NBR 9,050/2004) Vertical and horizontal support bars: • The vertical bar must measure 0.70m in length and be positioned on the wall adjacent to the transfer platform, aligned with the outside surface of the bathtub, at a height of 0.10m above the platform • The horizontal bars must measure at least 0.80m in length and be attached respectively at a height of 0.10 and 0.30m in relation to the upper edge of the bathtub Taps: • The bathtub’s taps and mixer mechanisms must be easy to handle, with a lever-type arrangement, preferably a mono mixer (NBR 9,050/2004 and IPC requirements) Devices: • Install an emergency device next to bathtubs and shower cubicles to be activated in the event of a fall. This signalling device must be attached at a height of 0.40m above the finished floor (NBR 9,050/2004) • Provide a telephone or another communications service or alarm installed in bathrooms, which may be accessed easily if assistance is needed or in the event of an emergency, attached at a height that enables it to be used by someone in a wheelchair • The telephone handset must have a 1.50m wire • Install a thermostatic control valve in bathtubs (IPC)
  92. 92. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201392 3.1.11. Kitchens in accommodation • In kitchens in apart-hotels or small accommodation blocks (Figure 3.16), one must guarantee circulation, approach and reach of utensils (NBR 9,050/2004) • The sinks must have a maximum height of 0.85m, with lower clearance of at least 0.73m (NBR 9,050/2004) • Kitchen cabinets must be accessible, preferably with spring mechanisms for opening them (NBR 9,050/2004) • All sideboards must have a maximum height of 85cm, with lower clearance of at least 0.73m (NBR 9,050/2004) 0.30 0.80 1.20 0.30 0.30 0.100.70 Min 0.80 0.40 Fixed platform with anti-slip coating Transfer area Transfer area 0.80 x 1.20 Emergency button 0.100.20 0.20 0.45 Dimensions in metres Figure 3.15
  93. 93. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 93 3.2 Wheelchair-friendly bedrooms The concept of wheelchair-friendly bedrooms is not the same as accessible bedrooms or adaptable bedrooms. It is an additional option to raise the quality of accommodation in general. The IPC Accessibility Guide highlights that the technical limitations presented at some old establishments do not necessarily impede the use of facilities by people with motor or sensory limitations, provided that modifications are made to comply with accessibility standards. The installation of wheelchair-friendly bedrooms does not relieve establishments from the requirement to offer bedrooms that are fully adapted for people with disabilities. Characteristics of wheelchair-friendly bedrooms (Figure 3.17): • All bedroom doors, including bathroom doors, must have a minimum span of 0.80m (IPC) • The minimum transfer space next to the bed must be 0.90m (IPC) • There must be a space in the bedroom with a diameter of at least 1.20m, to enable someone in a wheelchair to change direction (IPC) Accessible cupboards 1.50 Min0.73 Max0.85 Dimensions in metres Figure 3.16
  94. 94. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 201394 • The height of the toilet must be between 0.44 and 0.48m (NBR 9,050/2004), with a lateral transfer space (NBR 9,050/2004 and IPC requirements) • There must be a bar or another solid structure to let people support themselves during transfer • The height of controls must be less than 1.40m or a suitable handling arrangement may be provided • A shower seat must be provided with a backrest and handrails at the shower’s entrance and exit (IPC) • If there is a bathtub rather than a shower, the requirement for a handrail still applies (IPC) One must also use the NBR 9,050/2004 standards as a reference for accessibility measures. 0.90 1.20 Dimensions in metres Figure 3.17
  95. 95. Rio 2016 Accessibility Technical Guidelines > version 3 | december 2013 95 3.3 Reception areas The existence of an accessible route linking the parking area to the entrance and reception area (Decree 5,296) is fundamental. The reception desk must be accessible to all people. It may have two heights – one to serve people standing up and the other to serve people in wheelchairs – provided that this does not constitute discriminatory service. The accessible service desk must be marked with the International Symbol of Access (NBR 9,050/2004). Dimensions of service desk for people in wheelchairs (Figure 3.18): • Maximum height of service desk: 0.90m • Minimum height of clearance under desk: 0.75m, although 0.73m is tolerable (NBR 9,050/2004) • Depth of clearance under desk: 0.50m, although a minimum of 0.30m is tolerable, in line with the reference area approach area of 0.80 x 1.20m (NBR 9,050/2004) Min 100cm mc09xaM Min75cm Min 50cm Figure 3.18

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