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2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study
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2002 Open Doors Organization Disability Study

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A study of the travel behavior and market potential of Americans with disabilities

A study of the travel behavior and market potential of Americans with disabilities

Published in: Travel, Education
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  • This study, follows on and adds quantified validation to, Simon Darcy's groundbreaking research in 'From Anxiety to Access.' It is summarized and updated in an analysis by Laurel van Horn in her TRANSED 2007 paper 'Disability Travel in the United States.' The concept Inclusive Tourism evolved from these and other seminal works such as Peter Neumann's 'The Economic Impulses of Accessible Tourism for All' and the design approach arising from the Disability Rights movement known as Universal Design.

    Slideshare contains downloadable and editable template presentations on the Seven Principles of Universal Design in English, Spanish , Portuguese, and French.
    A video clip from a presentation in Milan on Inclusive Tourism hosted by the Carlo Besta Institute is online here. The complete text is downloadable here.
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  • 1. Prepared for: Open Doors Organization 230 East Ohio Suite 101 Chicago, IL 60611 [email_address] January 2002 Research among Adults with Disabilities: Travel and Hospitality All rights reserved. This report is for use within the purchaser’s own organization only. Open Doors Organization data or information may not be reproduced or communicated by any means to other people, organizations or to the media without prior permission from the Open Doors Organization.
  • 2. Table of Contents <ul><li>Background 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Objectives 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Sample and Methodology 5 </li></ul><ul><li>Executive Summary 6 </li></ul><ul><li>Detailed Findings 16 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Chapter 1: General Travel 17 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chapter 2: Profile of Travelers with Disabilities 22 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chapter 3: Profile of a Typical Trip 26 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chapter 4: Travel by Air 37 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chapter 5: Hotels 48 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chapter 6: Cruises 59 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chapter 7: Restaurants 62 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Implications 67 </li></ul><ul><li>Respondent Profile 69 </li></ul><ul><li>Traveler Profile 73 </li></ul>
  • 3. <ul><li>The Open Doors Organization commissioned Harris Interactive to conduct a quantitative study among Americans with disabilities (aged 18 and older) to identify the basic travel habits and patterns of adults with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The development of the study was preceded by focus groups among people with disabilities as well as executive interviews with representatives from the travel industry. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The study was undertaken in response to the growing population of adults with disabilities. Assuming that incidence rates by age remain the same, by 2030 nearly 24% of the total US population will be disabled (and over 15% severely disabled). In addition, the total disabled population will increase by 30.9 million and the severely disabled population will increase by 21 million,when compared to 1997.* </li></ul></ul>Background *This data on the incidence of adults with disabilities was obtained through a study published by the Census Bureau in 2001, based on 1997 data, called Americans with Disabilities.
  • 4. <ul><li>Key objectives of the study are to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Measure general travel behaviors including how often adults with disabilities are traveling, with whom, how much they spend, and on which sources of information they rely to make decisions; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gauge experiences with airlines , cruise lines , restaurants , and hotels ; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Determine how well the needs of adults with disabilities are being met by airlines and hotels; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quantify the top services/products that would encourage adults with disabilities to fly and stay in hotels more often. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Estimate the current and potential economic impact of the disability community </li></ul></ul>Objectives
  • 5. <ul><li>Total sample includes 1,037 interviews with adults with disabilities: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>534 interviews were conducted online (using The Harris Poll Online Database) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>503 interviews were conducted by telephone (using a prescreened sample of adults with disabilities from The Harris Poll ) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Disability was defined as having blindness, deafness, or a condition that substantially limits one or more basic physical activities such as walking, climbing stairs, reaching, lifting or carrying. Respondents were screened based on this criteria using a variation of the 2000 Census question. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>15% of the general adult population (or more than 31 million adults aged 18 and older) defines themselves as having one or more of these characteristics.* </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Data was weighted to represent the populations with these disabilities aged 18 and older. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Interviewing was conducted between September 23, 2002 and October 9, 2002. </li></ul><ul><li>Interviews were an average of 21 minutes in length. </li></ul>Sample and Methodology *This data on the incidence of adults with disabilities was obtained through The Harris Poll (November 2002) and based off of the 209,128,094 people age 18 years and older in the US population, according to the 2000 U.S. Census.
  • 6. Executive Summary
  • 7. Executive Summary <ul><li>General Travel </li></ul><ul><li>71% of adults with disabilities (or more than 22 million people) have traveled at least once in the past 2 years.* This includes: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>5.6 million business travelers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>21 million pleasure/leisure travelers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>5 million travelers who combine business and pleasure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Overall, adults with disabilities take about 2 trips every 2 years (or approximately 63 million total trips), the majority of which are for pleasure. And, each trip generally lasts 5 days. </li></ul><ul><li>There is also a subgroup of more frequent travelers in the disability community – 20% of all adults with disabilities travel at least 6 times every 2 years. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>*This data is based on the 2000 U.S. Census which estimates that there are 209,128,094 people age 18 years and older in the U.S. population. The data on incidence of adults with disabilities w as obtained through The Harris Poll (November 2002). </li></ul></ul>
  • 8. Executive Summary <ul><li>General Travel (continued) </li></ul><ul><li>While traveling, the typical adult with a disability spends $430, which means current travel expenditures among the disability population top $27 billion over the course of 2 years. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The target traveler (or heavy spender*) among the disability population has one or more of the following characteristics: household incomes of $35,000 or more; between the ages of 35 and 49; college graduates; and/or married. </li></ul></ul>*Heavy spenders are defined as adults with disabilities who on average spend $1,000 or more on a trip.
  • 9. Executive Summary <ul><li>Sources of Information </li></ul><ul><li>When planning a trip, the Internet is a key resource for adults with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Almost half of those who travel (46%) say they consult the Internet for accessibility information. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>One-third (33%) of those who travel book their trips most frequently online. This appears to be somewhat higher than the general population.* </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Word of mouth is also an extremely important source of information for adults with disabilities – 85% of those who travel say they share their travel experiences with others, indicating a powerful network among travelers with disabilities. </li></ul>*According to the Travel Industry Association, 27% of travelers in the past year used the Internet for actually booking something related to their travel.
  • 10. Executive Summary <ul><li>Airlines </li></ul><ul><li>30% of adults with disabilities have traveled by air in the past 2 years (or 9.4 million air travelers in total). </li></ul><ul><li>Air travelers typically take 2 flights every 2 years and spend $349 per flight (or $3.3 billion per year for the entire airline industry). </li></ul><ul><li>Air travelers say they would take 2 more flights per year if airlines were to accommodate their needs as a person with a disability. This translates into 18.8 million more flights – and means that air spending by the disability community could double if airlines were to make necessary accommodations. </li></ul><ul><li>The top features or services that airlines would need to offer to encourage more frequent travel would be: 1) more accommodating staff, 2) guaranteed preferred seating, and 3) a designated employee at check-in and arrival. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  • 11. Executive Summary <ul><li>Hotels, Motels and Inns </li></ul><ul><li>55% of adults with disabilities have stayed in hotels, motels or inns in past 2 years (or 17.3 million hotel users). </li></ul><ul><li>Hotel users typically stay in hotels 2 times every 2 years and spend about $241 per visit (or $4.2 billion per year for the entire hotel industry). </li></ul><ul><li>Hotel users say they would stay in hotels 2 more times per year if hotels were to accommodate their needs as a person with a disability. This translates into 34.5 million more hotel stays – and means that hotel spending by the disability community could double if hotels were to make necessary accommodations. </li></ul><ul><li>The top features or services that hotels would need to offer to encourage more frequent hotel stays would be: 1) rooms close to entrance, hotel restaurants/food court, and transportation and 2) more accommodating staff. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Based on qualitative research, “accommodating” staff seems to be interpreted as “sensitive” or “solicitous.” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  • 12. Executive Summary <ul><li>Cruises </li></ul><ul><li>In the past five years, 12% of adults with disabilities have taken a cruise. This appears to be somewhat higher than the general population.*   </li></ul><ul><li>Repeat business for cruises is particularly high. 59% of those who have taken a cruise in the past five years plan to take another cruise in the coming five years. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>*According to the Cruise Lines International Association (2002 Market Profile Study), only 8% of the U.S. general population has taken a cruise in the past 5 years.
  • 13. Executive Summary <ul><li>Restaurants </li></ul><ul><li>On average, adults with disabilities patronize fast food restaurants, casual restaurants and more formal restaurants about once per week each. Typical personal expenditures range from $5 for fast food restaurants to $15 for more formal restaurants. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Adults with disabilities select their favorite (and most frequented) restaurants for the same reasons as adults without disabilities do – based on the taste of the food, the value, and the service. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>$15 35% More formal restaurants $9 36% Casual dining restaurants (e.g. Denny’s or Shoney’s) $5 53% Fast food restaurants Median Personal Expenditures % who patronize at least once per week
  • 14. Detailed Findings
  • 15. Chapter 1: General Travel
  • 16. Overall Number of Trips Q500 How many trips have you taken in the past 2 years for business? Q501 How many trips have you taken in the past 2 years for pleasure? Q502 How many trips have you taken in the past 2 years for business & pleasure? Base: All respondents (n=1037) <ul><li>71% of adults with disabilities traveled at least once in the past 2 years. Typically, adults with disabilities take about 2 trips every 2 years, though 1 out of 5 are more frequent travelers who take 6 trips or more. </li></ul>Total Trips Taken in Past 2 Years MEDIAN = 2
  • 17. Sharing Travel Experiences <ul><li>Word of mouth is a powerful vehicle in the disability community – 85% of adults with disabilities who travel share their travel experiences with others. </li></ul>Q540 Which of the following statements best reflects how likely you are to share your personal travel experiences with others? Base: Has taken a trip (n=778) Share Travel Experience 85%
  • 18. Method of Booking Trips <ul><li>One-third of adults with disabilities who travel book their trips most frequently online. Only about 1 out of 5 use a travel agent. </li></ul>Q515 Which method do you use most frequently to book your trips? Base: Has taken a trip (n=778) Use Travel Agent 22 %
  • 19. Sources of Information <ul><li>Among those who travel, previous personal experience, friends and family, and the Internet are the top 3 sources of accessibility information for adults with disabilities who travel. </li></ul>Q545 In general, when planning a trip, what are your best sources of information about which companies, services and products are most accessible for people with disabilities? Base: Has taken a trip (n=778)
  • 20. Reasons for Favorite Restaurant <ul><li>Taste of food, value, and service top the list of reasons why adults with disabilities return to their favorite restaurants. </li></ul>Q725 Which of the following best describe why you keep going back to eat at your most-frequented restaurants? Base: All respondents (n=1037) Service 89%
  • 21. Chapter 2: Profile of Travelers with Disabilities
  • 22. Profile of Travelers with Disabilities <ul><li>Among all adults with disabilities… </li></ul><ul><li>General travel </li></ul><ul><li>71% have traveled at least once in the past 2 years </li></ul><ul><li>20% are frequent travelers … and have taken 6 or more trips in the past 2 years. </li></ul><ul><li>Type of travel </li></ul><ul><li>67% have traveled for pleasure </li></ul><ul><li>18% have traveled for business </li></ul><ul><li>16% have traveled for a combination of business and pleasure </li></ul><ul><li>Travel by air </li></ul><ul><li>30% have traveled by air in the past 2 years </li></ul><ul><li>10% are heavy airline users … and have taken 3 or more flights in the past two years </li></ul><ul><li>Stays in hotels </li></ul><ul><li>55% have stayed in hotels in the past 2 years </li></ul><ul><li>22% are heavy hotel users … and have stayed in hotels 3 or more times in the past 2 years </li></ul><ul><li>Travel expenditures </li></ul><ul><li>17% are heavy spenders …and typically spend more than $1,000 on a trip. </li></ul>
  • 23. Profile of Heavy Airline Users, Heavy Hotel Users, and Heavy Spenders <ul><li>34% of all adults with disabilities fall into one or more of the following categories: heavy airline users, heavy hotel users or heavy spenders. </li></ul>All adults with disabilities Heavy Airline Users 2% Heavy Spenders 10% Heavy Hotel Users 10% 0% 3% 5% 4%
  • 24. Profile of Travel Expenditures <ul><li>Travelers with disabilities have taken more than 63 million trips in the past 2 years and typically spend $430 per trip. </li></ul><ul><li>So, total travel expenditures for the disability community equal…. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>More than $27 billion for 2 years </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Approximately $13.6 billion annually </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  • 25. Chapter 3: Profile of a Typical Trip
  • 26. Total Trips for Business, Pleasure or Combination <ul><li>Most of the trips taken by adults with disabilities are for pleasure. </li></ul>Q500 How many trips have you taken in the past 2 years for business? Q501 How many trips have you taken in the past 2 years for pleasure? Q502 How many trips have you taken in the past 2 years for business & pleasure? Base: All respondents (n=1037) Q517 Now, thinking about your last trip, did you take your last trip for business, pleasure or both? Base: Has taken a trip (n=778) % Last Trip % Total Trips
  • 27. Profile of Typical Trip Q520 Again, thinking about your last trip, how many of the following people traveled with you? Q525 On your last trip, how many nights were you away from home? Q530 Also, on your last trip, approximately how much did you personally spend on . . . ? Base: Has taken a trip (n=778) *This figure is the median expenditures for the people who use this service. For example, the median expenditures ($349) for airfare is based off of only those who traveled by plane. As such, the specific expenditures will not equal the total. Travel companions Nights Away From Home MEDIAN = 5 <ul><li>On a typical trip, adults with disabilities: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend 5 nights away from home; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have 1 companion; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend $430. </li></ul></ul>MEDIAN = 1 companion $100 Entertainment (e.g., theater, theme parks and museums)* $349 Airfare* $105 Food and beverages* $241 Accommodations (such as hotels, inns or motels)** $28 $98 $430 Median Mass transit* Car (e.g., gas, tolls, rental)* Total expenses
  • 28. Profile of Typical Trip – Business (18% of total trips) Travel companions Nights Away From Home MEDIAN = 4 <ul><li>On a typical business trip, adults with disabilities: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend 4 nights away from home; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have 1 companion; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend $330. </li></ul></ul>Q520 Again, thinking about your last trip, how many of the following people traveled with you? Q525 On your last trip, how many nights were you away from home? Q530 Also, on your last trip, approximately how much did you personally spend on . . . ? Base: Last trip was for business (n=53) *This figure is the median expenditures for the people who use this service. For example, the median expenditures ($530) for airfare is based off of only those who traveled by plane. As such, the specific expenditures will not equal the total. MEDIAN = 1 companion Median $105 Entertainment (e.g., theater, theme parks and museums)* $530 Airfare* $99 Food and beverages* $226 Accommodations (such as hotels, inns or motels)* $92 $108 $330 Mass transit* Car (e.g., gas, tolls, rental)* Total personal expenses
  • 29. Profile of Typical Trip – Pleasure (66% of total trips) Travel companions Nights Away From Home MEDIAN = 5 <ul><li>On a typical pleasure trip, adults with disabilities: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend 5 nights away from home; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have 1 companion; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend $441. </li></ul></ul>Q520 Again, thinking about your last trip, how many of the following people traveled with you? Q525 On your last trip, how many nights were you away from home? Q530 Also, on your last trip, approximately how much did you personally spend on . . . ? Base: Last trip was for pleasure (n=647) *This figure is the median expenditures for the people who use this service. For example, the median expenditures ($350) for airfare is based off of only those who traveled by plane. As such, the specific expenditures will not equal the total. MEDIAN = 1 companion $101 Entertainment (e.g., theater, theme parks and museums)* $350 Airfare* $105 Food and beverages* $248 Accommodations (such as hotels, inns or motels)* $27 $93 $441 Median Mass transit* Car (e.g., gas, tolls, rental)* Total personal expenses
  • 30. Profile of Typical Trip - Combined Business & Pleasure (16% of total trips) Travel companions Nights Away From Home MEDIAN = 3 <ul><li>On a typical combined business and pleasure trip, adults with disabilities: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend 3 nights away from home; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have 1 companion; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend $435. </li></ul></ul>Q520 Again, thinking about your last trip, how many of the following people traveled with you? Q525 On your last trip, how many nights were you away from home? Q530 Also, on your last trip, approximately how much did you personally spend on . . . ? Base: Last trip was combination of business and pleasure (n=64) *This figure is the median expenditures for the people who use this service. For example, the median expenditures ($233) for airfare is based off of only those who traveled by plane. As such, the specific expenditures will not equal the total. MEDIAN = 1 companion $53 Entertainment (e.g., theater, theme parks and museums)* $233 Airfare* $94 Food and beverages* $211 Accommodations (such as hotels, inns or motels)* $19 $91 $435 Median Mass transit* Car (e.g., gas, tolls, rental)* Total personal expenses
  • 31. Profile of Typical Trip – Frequent Travelers** (20% of all adults with disabilities) Travel companions Nights Away From Home MEDIAN = 5 <ul><li>On a typical trip, frequent travelers: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend 5 nights away from home; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have 1 companion; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend $388. </li></ul></ul>Q520 Again, thinking about your last trip, how many of the following people traveled with you? Q525 On your last trip, how many nights were you away from home? Q530 Also, on your last trip, approximately how much did you personally spend on . . . ? Base: Has taken a trip and frequent traveler (n=246) *This figure is the median expenditures for the people who use this service. For example, the median expenditures ($349) for airfare is based off of only those who traveled by plane. As such, the specific expenditures will not equal the total. **Frequent travelers are defined as adults with disabilities who take 6 or more trips every 2 years. MEDIAN = 1 companion $97 Entertainment (e.g., theater, theme parks and museums)* $349 Airfare* $98 Food and beverages* $232 Accommodations (such as hotels, inns or motels)* $22 $78 $388 Median Mass transit* Car (e.g., gas, tolls, rental)* Total personal expenses
  • 32. Profile of Typical Trip – Heavy Spenders** (17% of all adults with disabilities) Travel companions Nights Away From Home MEDIAN = 7 <ul><li>On a typical trip, heavy spenders: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend 7 nights away from home; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have 2 companions; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend $1,621. </li></ul></ul>Q520 Again, thinking about your last trip, how many of the following people traveled with you? Q525 On your last trip, how many nights were you away from home? Q530 Also, on your last trip, approximately how much did you personally spend on . . . ? Base: Has taken a trip and heavy spender (n=209) *This figure is the median expenditures for the people who use this service. For example, the median expenditures ($613) for airfare is based off of only those who traveled by plane. As such, the specific expenditures will not equal the total. **Heavy spenders are defined as adults with disabilities who on average spend $1,000 or more on a trip. MEDIAN = 2 companions $223 Entertainment (e.g., theater, theme parks and museums)* $613 Airfare* $316 Food and beverages* $576 Accommodations (such as hotels, inns or motels)* $50 $198 $1,621 Median Mass transit* Car (e.g., gas, tolls, rental)* Total personal expenses
  • 33. Profile of Typical Trip – Heavy Airline Users** (10% of all adults with disabilities) Travel companions Nights Away From Home MEDIAN = 7 <ul><li>On a typical trip, heavy airline users: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend 7 nights away from home; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have 1 companion; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend $661. </li></ul></ul>Q520 Again, thinking about your last trip, how many of the following people traveled with you? Q525 On your last trip, how many nights were you away from home? Q530 Also, on your last trip, approximately how much did you personally spend on . . . ? Base: Has taken a trip and heavy airline user (n=154) *This figure is the median expenditures for the people who use this service. For example, the median expenditures ($349) for airfare is based off of only those who traveled by plane. As such, the specific expenditures will not equal the total. **Heavy airline users are defined as adults with disabilities who have flown 3 or more times in the past 2 years. MEDIAN = 1 companion $105 Entertainment (e.g., theater, theme parks and museums)* $349 Airfare* $140 Food and beverages* $300 Accommodations (such as hotels, inns or motels)** $26 $108 $661 Median Mass transit* Car (e.g., gas, tolls, rental)* Total personal expenses
  • 34. Profile of Typical Trip – Heavy Hotel Users** (22% of all adults with disabilities) Travel companions Nights Away From Home MEDIAN = 5 <ul><li>On a typical trip, heavy hotel users: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend 5 nights away from home; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have 1 companion; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spend $689. </li></ul></ul>Q520 Again, thinking about your last trip, how many of the following people traveled with you? Q525 On your last trip, how many nights were you away from home? Q530 Also, on your last trip, approximately how much did you personally spend on . . . ? Base: Has taken a trip and heavy hotel user (n=312) *This figure is the median expenditures for the people who use this service. For example, the median expenditures ($348) for airfare is based off of only those who traveled by plane. As such, the specific expenditures will not equal the total. **Heavy hotel users are defined as adults with disabilities who have stayed in hotels 3 or more times in the past 2 years. MEDIAN = 1 companion $108 Entertainment (e.g., theater, theme parks and museums)* $348 Airfare* $147 Food and beverages* $304 Accommodations (such as hotels, inns or motels)* $25 $107 $689 Median Mass transit* Car (e.g., gas, tolls, rental)* Total personal expenses
  • 35. Total Expenditures – By Marital Status, Income, Age and Education <ul><li>Average expenditures are higher for adults with disabilities in one or more of the following categories: those who are married, have higher incomes, are college graduates, and/or are between the ages of 35 and 49. </li></ul>Q530 Also, on your last trip, approximately how much did you personally spend on . . . ? Base: Has taken a trip (n=778) $704 $75K or more $697 $50K to less than $75K $725 $35K to less than $49.9K $383 $15K to less than $34.9K $384 Less than $15K Income $498 Married/living with spouse $384 Single Marital Status MEDIAN Total Personal Expenses Education $342 High school graduate or less $521 Some college $676 College graduate or more Age $300 18-34 $564 35-49 $403 50-64 $478 65 or older MEDIAN Total Personal Expenses
  • 36. Chapter 4: Travel By Air
  • 37. Profile of Air Travelers <ul><li>30% of adults with disabilities have traveled by air in the past 2 years (or 9.4 million air travelers). </li></ul><ul><li>Air travelers typically take 2 trips every 2 years (or 18.8 million trips) and spend $349 per flight. </li></ul><ul><li>So, total expenditures for the airline industry among travelers with disabilities equal…. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>More than $6.6 billion for 2 years </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Approximately $3.3 billion annually* </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>*According to the Travel Industry Association, total air passenger revenues in 2002 were $72.9 billion. Therefore, adults with disabilities contribute about 4.5% of total revenues.
  • 38. Trips By Air <ul><li>43% of travelers with disabilities have taken at least 1 flight in the past 2 years. </li></ul>Q505 For how many of these trips did you travel by air? Base: Has taken a trip (n=778) Number of Airline Flights Taken by Travelers with Disabilities over the Past 2 Years 43%
  • 39. Heavy Airline Users <ul><li>Heavy airline users take 3 or more flights every 2 years and comprise 10% of all adults with disabilities. </li></ul>All adults with disabilities Adults with disabilities who travel (71%) Adults with disabilities who fly (30%) Heavy airline users (10%)
  • 40. Special Devices/Equipment <ul><li>The use of an airport wheelchair and a meet-and-assist service are by far the most important services needed by adults with disabilities (and also heavy airline users). </li></ul>Q625 Which of the following special devices do you need when you travel by air? Base: Has traveled by air (n=378)
  • 41. Features/Services That Encourage More Frequent Travel By Air <ul><li>More accommodating staff, guaranteed seating, and designated assistance at check-in/arrival top the list of services airlines need to offer in order to encourage more frequent travel among adults with disabilities. Guaranteed preferred seating is far and away the top service requested by heavy airline users. </li></ul>Q635 Which of the following two items would encourage you to fly more often? Base: All respondents (n=1037) NOTE: This analysis was performed using a trade-off technique called the Compass Method. 15% of adults with disabilities answered that none of the services offered would encourage them to fly more often. Instructions for reading this table: The “rank” column shows the order of respondents’ preferences. The “index” column is the share of preference for each item. “100” is the score we would expect each item to receive, if all items were considered equally important. Anything above 100 is considered more important and anything less than 100 is considered less important. In addition, the “index” shows the relative importance of each item. For example, guaranteed preferred seating (index=188) is five times more important than use of an onboard wheelchair (index=37). Heavy Airline Users All Adults With Disabilities 5 12 14 37 41 50 74 113 118 124 128 135 140 148 176 188 198 Index 2 10 6 17 14 27 75 89 101 85 106 167 117 155 190 350 189 Index 17 15 16 13 14 12 11 9 8 10 7 4 6 5 2 1 3 Rank 6 Increased sensitivity to my needs during security checks 17 Braille safety cards 16 Service animals 15 Assistive hearing devices 14 Use of onboard wheelchair 13 Oxygen available on board 12 Use of airport transfer chair to get to my seat 11 Attendants who do not call unnecessary attention to my needs 10 More time to board or exit the plane 9 Use of airport wheelchair to get to the gate 8 Wheelchair drop off and pick up at gate 7 Accessible lavatory 4 Meet and assist service at the gate 2 Guaranteed preferred seating (aisle seat upfront, preferably bulkhead) 3 Designated employee at check-in and arrival 1 Staff who go out of their way to accommodate my special needs 5 Rank Centralized phone number to call
  • 42. Top 5 Features/Services That Would Encourage More Frequent Air Travel – By Severity and Type of Disability <ul><li>The same features/services would also encourage more air travel, regardless of severity or type of disability. Guaranteed preferred seating and more accommodating staff top the list for all groups. </li></ul>Q635 Which of the following two items would encourage you to fly more often? Base: Blindness (n=141); Deafness (n=175); Physical impairment (n=961); Slight/moderate (n=421); Somewhat/very severe (n=614) NOTE: This analysis was performed using a trade-off technique called the Compass Method. 5. Centralized phone number to call 4. Meet and assist service at the gate 3. Designated employee at check-in and arrival 2. Guaranteed preferred seating 1. Staff who go out of their way to accommodate my special needs Physical Impairment 4. Increased sensitivity to my needs during security checks 4. Designated employee at check-in and arrival 2. Centralized phone number to call 2. Guaranteed preferred seating 3. Staff who go out of their way to accommodate my special needs 3. Meet and assist service at the gate 1. Guaranteed preferred seating 1. Staff who go out of their way to accommodate my special needs 5. Designated employee at check-in and arrival Deafness 5. Centralized phone number to call Blindness 4. Meet and assist service at the gate 4. Meet and assist service at the gate 2. Guaranteed preferred seating 2. Designated employee at check-in and arrival 3. Designated employee at check-in and arrival 3. Staff who go out of their way to accommodate my special needs 1. Staff who go out of their way to accommodate my special needs 1. Guaranteed preferred seating 5. Increased sensitivity to my needs during security checks Somewhat/very severe disability 5. Centralized phone number to call Slight/moderate disability
  • 43. Potential For Air Travel if Needs Were Met <ul><li>If their needs were met, the typical traveler with a disability would take 2 more flights per year as would the typical heavy airline user. </li></ul>Q640 How many more trips do you think you would take in a given year if airlines were able to accommodate all of your primary needs as a person with a disability? Base: Has traveled by air (n=378); Heavy airline users (n=154) MEDIAN = 2 Air Travelers With Disabilities Heavy Airline Users (10% of adults with disabilities) MEDIAN = 2
  • 44. Potential Revenue for Airlines <ul><li>The airline industry has the potential to more than double its annual revenue from adults with disabilities (an additional $3.3 billion) if necessary accommodations are made. And, this is even a very conservative estimate, assuming that air travelers with disabilities have overstated two-fold how often they would take flights if accommodations are made. Moreover, airlines that reach out more aggressively and immediately to the disability market can expect to achieve a larger share of the $3.3 billion.  </li></ul>NOTE: Adults with disabilities are defined as those having blindness, deafness, or a condition that substantially limits one or more basic physical activities such as walking, climbing stairs, reaching, lifting or carrying. The data on the incidence of adults with disabilities was obtained through The Harris Poll (November 2002) and based off of the number of adults in the US population, according to the 2000 U.S. Census. The 30% incidence of air travelers was based off of data from this study.
  • 45. Chapter 5: Hotels
  • 46. Profile of Hotel Users <ul><li>55% of adults with disabilities have stayed in hotels in the past 2 years (or 17.3 million hotel users). </li></ul><ul><li>Hotel users typically stay in hotels 2 times every 2 years (or 34.5 million visits) and spend $241 per visit. </li></ul><ul><li>So, total expenditures for the hotel industry among travelers with disabilities equal…. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>More than $8.3 billion for 2 years </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Approximately $4.2 billion annually* </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>*According to the Travel Industry Association, total hotel room revenues in 2002 were $76.3 billion. Therefore, adults with disabilities contribute about 5.5% of total revenues.
  • 47. Stays in Hotels, Motels, or Inns <ul><li>64% of travelers with disabilities have stayed in hotels at least 1 time in the past 2 years. </li></ul>Q510 How many of these trips included one stay overnight in paid accommodations, such as a hotel or motel? Base: Has taken a trip (n=778) Number of Hotel Stays Taken by Travelers with Disabilities over the Past 2 Years 64%
  • 48. Heavy Hotel Users <ul><li>Heavy hotel users stay in hotels, motels or inns 3 or more times every two years and comprise 22% of all adults with disabilities. </li></ul>All adults with disabilities Adults with disabilities who travel (71%) Adults with disabilities who stay in hotels (55%) Heavy hotel users (22%)
  • 49. Features/Services That Encourage More Frequent Hotel Stays <ul><li>The location of the room (that is, a room close to the entrance, restaurants, and transportation) and accommodating, designated staff are the most important services that hotels need to offer to encourage adults with disabilities to visit more often. </li></ul>Q820 Which of the following two items would encourage you to stay in hotels more often? Base: All respondents (n=1037) NOTE: This analysis was performed using a trade-off technique called the Compass Method. 8% of adults with disabilities answered that none of the services offered would encourage them to stay in hotels more often. Instructions for reading this table: The “rank” column shows the order of respondents’ preferences. The “index” column is the share of preference for each item. If all items were considered equally important, “100” is the score we would expect each item to receive. Anything above 100 is considered more important and anything less than 100 is considered less important. In addition, the “index” shows the relative importance of each item. For example, room close to restaurants (index=280) is ten times more important than pool lift (index=28). Adults with Disabilities 96 99 99 122 124 132 134 164 168 263 280 Index 6 Internet access in room 11 Visual alert system for doors, phone, and smoke detector 10 Wheelchair accessible room with roll-in shower 9 Portable tub/shower seat available 8 Wall mounted shower seat available 7 Ramp access to entrances 4 Designated hotel employee at check-in 2 Room close to entrance and transportation 3 Staff who go out of their way to accommodate my special needs 1 Room close to hotel restaurants or food court 5 Rank Room service Adults with Disabilities 17 18 28 29 32 53 60 63 72 72 81 93 Index 12 Room with grab bars only 13 Wheelchair accessible room with bathtub 14 Staff who do not call unnecessary attention to my needs 15 Bed on open bed frame 16 Large print menus and property maps 22 In room TTY 23 Non wheelchair accessible room 20 Phone amplifier 18 Lower closet shelves 19 Captions on all television channels 17 Lower shower heads 21 Rank Pool lift
  • 50. Features/Services That Encourage More Frequent Hotel Stays By Heavy Hotel Users <ul><li>A convenient hotel room and accommodating, accessible staff are also the most important services requested by heavy hotel users. </li></ul>Q820 Which of the following two items would encourage you to stay in hotels more often? Base: Heavy hotel users (n=312) NOTE: This analysis was performed using a trade-off technique called the Compass Method. Instructions for reading this table: The “rank” column shows the order of respondents’ preferences. The “index” column is the share of preference for each item. If all items were considered equally important, “100” is the score we would expect each item to receive. Anything above 100 is considered more important and anything less than 100 is considered less important. In addition, the “index” shows the relative importance of each item. For example, room close to restaurants (index=318) is almost 17 times more important than pool lift (index=19). Heavy Hotel Users 74 12 Wheelchair accessible room with roll-in shower 86 91 97 107 116 119 134 162 194 318 348 Index 7 Room service 11 Visual alert system for doors, phone, and smoke detector 10 Portable tub/shower seat available 9 Room with grab bars only 8 Ramp access to entrances 5 Wall mounted shower seat available 3 Designated hotel employee at check-in 4 Staff who go out of their way to accommodate my special needs 2 Room close to hotel restaurants or food court 6 1 Rank Internet access in room Room close to entrance and transportation Heavy Hotel Users 17 19 24 24 27 45 48 56 57 62 73 Index 18 Lower closet shelves 23 Non wheelchair accessible room 22 Pool lift 21 In room TTY 20 Phone amplifier 19 Captions on all television channels 16 Lower shower heads 14 Wheelchair accessible room with bathtub 15 Bed on open bed frame 13 Staff who do not call unnecessary attention to my needs 17 Rank Large print menus and property maps
  • 51. Top 5 Features/Services That Would Encourage More Frequent Hotel Stays – By Severity and Type of Disability <ul><li>The same features/services would also encourage more hotel stays, regardless of severity or type of disability – the location of the room and more accommodating staff are important to all groups. </li></ul>Q635 Which of the following two items would encourage you to fly more often? Base: Blindness (n=141); Deafness (n=175); Physical impairment (n=961); Slight/moderate (n=421); Somewhat/very severe (n=614) NOTE: This analysis was performed using a trade-off technique called the Compass Method. 5. Room service 4. Designated hotel employee at check-in 3. Staff who go out of their way to accommodate my special needs 2. Room close to entrance and transportation 1. Room close to hotel restaurants or food court Physical Impairment 4. Designated hotel employee at check-in 4. Room service 2. Staff who go out of their way to accommodate my special needs 2. Room close to entrance and transportation 3. Room close to entrance and transportation 3. Staff who go out of their way to accommodate my special needs 1. Room close to hotel restaurants or food court 1. Room close to hotel restaurants or food court 5. Visual alert system for doors, phone, and smoke detector Deafness 5. Internet access in room Blindness 4. Designated hotel employee at check-in 4. Internet access in room 2. Room close to hotel restaurants or food court 2. Room close to entrance and transportation 3. Staff who go out of their way to accommodate my special needs 3. Designated hotel employee at check-in 1. Room close to entrance and transportation 1. Room close to hotel restaurants or food court 5. Ramp access to entrances Somewhat/very severe 5. Staff who go out of their way to accommodate my special needs Slight/Moderate
  • 52. Potential For Hotel Stays if Needs Were Met <ul><li>If their needs were met, the typical traveler with a disability would stay in hotels 2 more times per year as would the typical heavy hotel user. </li></ul>Q825 In a given year, how many time would you stay in a hotel if hotels were able to accommodate all of your primary needs as a person with a disability? Base: Has stayed in paid accommodations (n=607); Heavy hotel users (n=312) All Hotel Users With Disabilities Heavy Hotel Users 22% of all adults with disabilities MEDIAN = 2 MEDIAN = 2
  • 53. Potential Revenue for Hotels <ul><li>The hotel industry has the potential to more than double its annual revenue from adults with disabilities (an additional $4.2 billion) if necessary accommodations are made. And, this is even a very conservative estimate, assuming that hotel users with disabilities have overstated two-fold how often they would go to hotels if accommodations are made. Moreover, hotels that reach out more aggressively and immediately to the disability market can expect to achieve a larger share of the $4.2 billion. </li></ul>NOTE: Adults with disabilities are defined as those having blindness, deafness, or a condition that substantially limits one or more basic physical activities such as walking, climbing stairs, reaching, lifting or carrying. The data on the incidence of adults with disabilities was obtained through The Harris Poll (November 2002) and based off of the number of adults in the US population, according to the 2000 U.S. Census. The 55% incidence of hotel users was based off of data from this study.
  • 54. Chapter 6: Cruises
  • 55. Taken a Cruise in the Past Five Years <ul><li>12% of adults with disabilities have taken a cruise in the past 5 years. </li></ul>Q645 Have you taken a cruise in the past five years? Base: All respondents (n=1037)
  • 56. Taken a Cruise in the Past Five Years <ul><li>Most adults with disabilities don’t anticipate taking a cruise in the next 5 years. However, once adults with disabilities have taken a cruise, they are likely to want to take a cruise again. </li></ul>Q650 And, on a scale of 1 to 7 with “1” representing “not likely at all” and “7” representing “extremely likely” , how likely are you to take a cruise in the next five years? Base: All respondents (n=1037); Has taken a cruise in the past five years (n=121) NOTE: On the 7 point scale, “likely” is associated with a rating of 5,6 or7; “neither likely nor unlikely” is associated with a rating of 4; and “unlikely” is associated with a rating of 1,2, or 3. % Likelihood to Take Cruise in Next Five Years
  • 57. Implications
  • 58. Implications <ul><li>Despite the hurdles and frustrations expressed during preliminary qualitative research, the travel market among adults with disabilities is huge… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More than 22 million adults with disabilities have traveled in the past 2 years. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They have taken more than 63 million trips in the past 2 years. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They have spent over $27 billion on travel expenditures in the past 2 years. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Revenues from travelers with disabilities could double for both airlines and hotels, if appropriate accommodations are made. </li></ul><ul><li>The accommodations needed to capture this potential revenue do not seem to be cost-prohibitive or unattainable: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For airlines, more accommodating staff and guaranteed preferred seating </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For hotels, rooms close to transportation, entrances and restaurants and more accommodating staff </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Internet is an especially powerful vehicle among adults with disabilities who travel and has the opportunity to be better leveraged among travel suppliers when reaching out to adults with disabilities. </li></ul>
  • 59. Respondent Profile
  • 60. Respondent Profile Marital Status Total % Married 54 Single, never married 15 Divorced 11 Separated 3 Widowed 11 Living with partner 5 Decline to answer 1 Gender Total % Male 46 Female 54 Children <18 in Household Total % No children in household 75 1 11 2 7 3 or more 6 Decline to answer * Race Total % White 84 Black/African American 6 Native American or Alaskan Native 3 Mixed racial background 2 Other 1 Decline to answer 3 Ethnicity Yes, of Hispanic origin 5 No, not of Hispanic origin 92 Decline to answer 3 Age Total % 18 – 34 13 35 – 49 27 50 – 64 30 65+ 29 Decline to answer 1 MEAN 54
  • 61. Respondent Profile (continued) Education Total % High school graduate or less 51 Completed some college, but no degree 22 Associate’s degree 7 College graduate or more 19 Decline to answer 1 Household Income Total % Less than $25,000 41 $25,000 - $49,999 24 $50,000 - $74,999 11 $75,000 or more 8 Decline to answer 16 Employment Status Total % Employed (full-time, part-time, self-employed) 21 Not employed, but looking for work 4 Not employed and not looking for work 17 Retired 47 Student 3 Homemaker 11 Decline to answer 2 Region Total % East 19 Midwest 25 South 36 West 20
  • 62. Respondent Profile (continued) Type of Disability Total % Have blindness or vision impairment 14 Have deafness or hearing impairment 18 Have physical mobility impairment 92 Severity of Disability Total % Slight/Moderate (Net) 42 Slight 10 Moderate 32 Severe (Net) 58 Somewhat severe 40 Very severe 18
  • 63. Traveler Profile
  • 64. Traveler Profile Marital Status Total % Married 56 Single, never married 14 Divorced 12 Separated 2 Widowed 11 Living with partner 5 Decline to answer 1 Gender Total % Male 45 Female 55 Children <18 in Household Total % No children in household 74 1 13 2 7 3 or more 5 Decline to answer * Race Total % White 83 Black/African American 6 Native American or Alaskan 3 Native Mixed racial background 3 Other 1 Decline to answer 4 Ethnicity Yes, of Hispanic origin 4 No, not of Hispanic origin 93 Decline to answer 3 Age Total % 18 – 34 13 35 – 49 28 50 – 64 30 65+ 29 Decline to answer 1 MEAN 54
  • 65. Traveler Profile (continued) Education Total % High school graduate or less 46 Completed some college, but no degree 25 Associate’s degree 7 College graduate or more 20 Decline to answer 1 Household Income Total % Less than $25,000 37 $25,000 - $49,999 25 $50,000 - $74,999 13 $75,000 or more 10 Decline to answer 15 Employment Status Total % Employed (full-time, part-time, self-employed) 24 Not employed, but looking for work 4 Not employed and not looking for work 16 Retired 46 Student 5 Homemaker 11 Decline to answer 2 Region Total % East 20 Midwest 26 South 33 West 21
  • 66. Traveler Profile (continued) Type of Disability Total % Have blindness or vision impairment 12 Have deafness or hearing impairment 18 Have physical mobility impairment 91 Severity of Disability Total % Slight/Moderate (Net) 43 Slight 11 Moderate 33 Severe (Net) 57 Somewhat severe 42 Very severe 15

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