Does DNA methylation facilitate phenotypic plasticity in marine invertebrates?

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Presentation given at the Friday Harbor Laboratories on August 13th, 2014

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Does DNA methylation facilitate phenotypic plasticity in marine invertebrates?

  1. 1. Does DNA methylation facilitate phenotypic plasticity in marine invertebrates? Steven Roberts School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences robertslab.info @sr320
  2. 2. Shameless plug onsnetwork.org/eimd @EIMD_fhl
  3. 3. Shameless plug onsnetwork.org/eimd @EIMD_fhl
  4. 4. Does DNA methylation facilitate phenotypic plasticity in marine invertebrates?
  5. 5. Open Science • You are free to Share! • Our lab practices open notebook science • Data, Preprints, Proposals, Slidedecks available FigShare, GitHub, and lab website (robertslab.info) These slides plus links @ robertslab.info
  6. 6. commercially important traits Lab Background
  7. 7. commercially important traits modified from Lab Background
  8. 8. modified from
  9. 9. modified from
  10. 10. modified from
  11. 11. Today modified from 1 2 3
  12. 12. Histone Modification Epigenetics short RNAs DNA Methylation
  13. 13. Photo credit: Flickr, Creative Commons, he-boden Epigenetics
  14. 14. Epigenetics
  15. 15. m m DNA Methylation
  16. 16. Function?
  17. 17. Non- Vertebrates? landscape and function is very different than what is observed in vertebrates
  18. 18. Non- Vertebrates? landscape and function is very different than what is observed in vertebrates
  19. 19. Non- Vertebrates? landscape and function is very different than what is observed in vertebrates
  20. 20. Absent in several model organisms
  21. 21. Function?Oysters?
  22. 22. mosaic associated with gene bodies
  23. 23. Roberts and Gavery 2012 in silico analysis
  24. 24. Roberts and Gavery 2012 in silico analysis
  25. 25. Roberts and Gavery 2012 in silico analysis
  26. 26. Two Lineages - Sperm + Larvae (72h & 120h) Claire Olson Whole Genome BS-Seq
  27. 27. Claire Olson Differentially Methylated Loci predominant in Transposable Elements
  28. 28. Claire Olson github.com/sr320/olson-dev
  29. 29. Summary • Sparsely (~16 %) methylated genome • Gene body methylation • Function specific •TEs are not hypermethylated across genome • Preliminary evidence indicates DMRs are predominant in TEs
  30. 30. Role?
  31. 31. In species that experience a diverse range of environmental conditions, processes have evolved to increase the number of potential phenotypes in a population in order to improve the chances for an individual’s survival.
  32. 32. Roberts and Gavery 2012 in silico analysis
  33. 33. Stochastic Variation housekeeping response to change
  34. 34. Mackenzie Gavery
  35. 35. housekeeping response to change
  36. 36. Targeted Regulation
  37. 37. Mackenzie Gavery
  38. 38. Mackenzie Gavery
  39. 39. Transposable Elements providing increased diversity?
  40. 40. modified from Beginning to test these Hypotheses
  41. 41. Very new data Environment and gene expression stochastic or targeted?
  42. 42. Very new data Environmental impact (Estrogens)
  43. 43. Very new data Ocean Acidification Selection Environmental Impact Katie Lotterhos
  44. 44. Very new data Heritability Plasticity Local Adaptation Genetics versus Epigenetics Common Garden Experiment
  45. 45. Acknowledgements Mackenzie Gavery Claire Ellis Sam White Bill Howe Dan Halperin EPA STAR DNA methylation robertslab.infoslides, data & more @

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