Squash Ontario - State of the Sport 2014

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Squash Ontario - State of the Sport 2014

  1. 1. 0 2014 STATE OF THE SPORT A Comprehensive Report on Recreation and Leisure Trends in Canada, including the Sport of Squash
  2. 2. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sherry Funston (Executive Director, Squash Ontario) Richard Yendell (Technical and Player Development Director, Squash Ontario) Meaghan Griffin (Sport 4 Ontario) Jeff Deverill (Barrie Athletic Club) Mike Taylor (Caliber Sports) Squash Suppliers Jeff Corey (Harrow) Larry Howes (Squash Unlimited) Seanna Keating (Dunlop) Carlos Loo (Oliver) Chris Quan (Asics) Fred Reid (Black Knight) Blair Rickers (Wilson) Tammie Sangster (Head) Jeff Watts (Karakal) Adrian Webb (Tecnifibre) League Co-ordinators Stacy Bell (COSA East) Lynn Dussiaume (Sudbury City League) Matt Easingwood (Niagara Region League) Ray Kerslake (COSA North) John Lea (ODSL) Carolyn Moss (TDWSA) Gordon Robertson (T&D Men’s League) Cathy Tuckwell (OWSDL) Peter Urkedal (SW Squash League) Research: Mujtaba Mirza, Administrative Co-Ordinator Squash Ontario Written Report: Mujtaba Mirza, Administrative Co-Ordinator Squash Ontario 2014 Squash Ontario Annual General Meeting © Squash Ontario - June 14th , 2014
  3. 3. Contents INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................................................................................1 DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS IN ONTARIO ...................................................................................................................................2 ONTARIO DEMOGRAPHIC QUARTERLY: HIGHLIGHTS OF THE FOURTH QUARTER 2013 ...............................................3 ECONOMIC TRENDS IN ONTARIO ..........................................................................................................................................4 LEISURE TRENDS IN CANADA................................................................................................................................................. 5 SUMMARY OF DEMOGRAPHIC, ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND LEISURE TRENDS ...................................................................12 SQUASH ONTARIO PARTICIPATION TRENDS 2009-2014.....................................................................................................13 JUNIOR PARTICIPATION...................................................................................................................................................13 ADULTS & MASTERS PARTICIPATION .............................................................................................................................19 SANCTION EVENT PARTICIPATION..................................................................................................................................21 LEAGUE PARTICIPATION ..................................................................................................................................................23 SQUASH COURTS IN ONTARIO.............................................................................................................................................24 SQUASH EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS & RETAILERS REPORT..................................................................................... 25 SQUASH PARTICIPATION BY LOCATION IN THE PROVINCE CURRENT ONTARIO MEMBERS ........................................26 OBSERVATIONS.....................................................................................................................................................................30 APPENDIX .............................................................................................................................................................................. 32
  4. 4. 1 INTRODUCTION The Value of Demographic Trends Staying up to date on the latest demographic trends enables businesses to identify existing and emerging markets for their products and services – in our case, squash players and potential squash players. When combined with behavioral and attitudinal data, demographics can be used to improve marketing effectiveness by helping businesses target new customer segments with the right messages at the right time. When done well, businesses can increase consumer awareness, improve customer acquisition efforts, and bolster customer retention rates. Following is a comprehensive and all-inclusive look at the “state of sport and leisure” in Canada as well as the “state of squash”. For the purposes of the report we have used our own participation numbers, current demographic and economic data provided by Statistics Canada and Ontario Ministry of Finance data, and sport participation report published by Heritage Canada. We have also included data from the 2014 Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.
  5. 5. 2 DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS IN ONTARIO Ontario’s demographic trends have been changing for quite some time. Club Owners, managers and squash professionals need to understand the wider demographic, social, economic trends in the province as they relate to leisure activities such as participation in sport. Here are highlights of Ontario demographics as published on the Ontario Ministry of Finance website. (http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/economy/demographics/projections/)  Ontario has an aging population. From 1996 to 2013, the age groups that have grown as percentage of the total population are 15-24, 45-64, 65-74 and 75+. Future trends, as indicated in the Ministry of Finance data, age groups that are will grow as percentage of the total population are 65-74 and 75+. Median age has increased to 40.3 years since 1996 and is projected to increase to 43.5 in 2036.  Ontario’s population is growing as percentage of the rest of Canada. On the other hand our annual growth rate is declining. Ontario’s population is projected to grow by 28.6 per cent, or almost 3.9 million, over the next 24 years, from an estimated 13.5 million on July 1, 2012 to almost 17.4 million by July 1, 2036. The annual rate of growth of Ontario’s population is projected to remain close to 1.0 per cent for most of the projection period.  Net migration is projected to account for 71 per cent of all population growth in the province over the 2012–2036 period, with natural increase accounting for the remaining 29 per cent. Over the last decade of the projections, the contribution of natural increase will moderate as baby boomers increasingly reach senior years and the number of deaths increases more rapidly.  The number of seniors aged 65 and over is projected to more than double from about 2.0 million, or 14.6 per cent of population, in 2012 to almost 4.2 million, or 24.0 per cent, by 2036. The growth in the share and number of seniors will accelerate over the 2012–2031 period as baby boomers turn age 65. After 2031, the growth in the number of seniors will slow significantly.  The number of children aged 0–14 is projected to increase gradually over the projection period, from 2.2 million in 2012 to over 2.7 million by 2036. The children’s share of population is projected to fall from 16.3 per cent in 2012 to 15.9 per cent by 2016, and to rise slightly over the 2021–2029 period to reach 16.0 per cent as the baby boom echo generation (children of baby boomers) have children. Thereafter, the share is projected to resume declining.  The number of Ontarians aged 15–64 is projected to grow from 9.3 million in 2012 to almost 10.5 million by 2036. This age group is projected to decline as a share of total population, falling from 69.1 per cent in 2012 to 60.4 per cent by 2036. As baby boomers turn age 65, the growth in population aged 15-64 will slow down until 2027–28 and then accelerate over the remainder of the projection.  The Greater Toronto Area (GTA) is projected to be the fastest growing region of the province, with its population increasing by 2.5 million, or 39.1 per cent, to reach over 8.9 million by 2036. The GTA’s share of provincial population is projected to rise from 47.6 per cent in 2012 to 51.5 per cent in 2036. All regions will see a shift to an older age structure. Regions where natural increase and net migration are projected to remain negative will see the largest shifts in age structure. The GTA is expected to remain the region with the youngest age structure as a result of strong international migration and positive natural increase.  The Aboriginal population is growing at about four times the rate of non-Aboriginals. Ontario has the greatest number of Aboriginal peoples across Canada at 301,425 people. In fact, over three million people in Ontario identify themselves as a member of a visible minority group. (National Household Survey. June 2013. http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/2011/as-sa/99-010-x/99-010-x2011001-eng.cfm#a4
  6. 6. 3 ONTARIO DEMOGRAPHIC QUARTERLY: HIGHLIGHTS OF THE FOURTH QUARTER 2013 Source: http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/economy/demographics/projections/ Estimates1 MOF Projections2 POPULATION (000s) 1996 2001 2006 2011 2012 2013 2016 2021 2026 2031 2036 Canada 29,610 31,021 32,571 34,343 34,754 35,158 36,494 38,406 40,288 42,094 43,822 Ontario 11,083 11,897 12,662 13,264 13,412 13,538 14,034 14,816 15,673 16,533 17,372 Ontario as % of Canada 37.4 38.4 38.9 38.6 38.6 38.5 38.5 38.6 38.9 39.3 39.6 Ontario Ave. Annual Growth Rate 1.2 1.4 1.3 0.9 1.1 0.9 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.1 1 (Over previous year shown) AGE DISTRIBUTION (%) 0-4 6.8 5.9 5.5 5.4 5.4 5.3 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.2 5 5-14 13.5 13.5 12.3 11.2 11 10.9 10.7 10.5 10.6 10.7 10.7 15-24 13.2 13.4 13.8 13.7 13.7 13.6 12.5 11.5 11.2 11.1 11.2 25-44 32.9 31.6 29.4 27.1 27 26.8 27.3 27.4 27 26.1 25.1 45-64 21.3 23.2 26 28.4 28.3 28.2 28 26.9 25.2 24 24 65-74 7.3 7 6.9 7.6 8 8.4 9.1 10.3 11.2 11.9 11.2 75+ 5 5.5 6.2 6.6 6.7 6.8 7.1 8 9.4 11 12.7 SELECTED AGE GROUPS (%) 0-14 20.3 19.4 17.8 16.6 16.4 16.2 15.9 15.8 15.9 15.9 15.7 15-64 67.4 68.1 69.2 69.1 68.9 68.6 67.9 65.9 63.4 61.2 60.4 65+ 12.2 12.5 13 14.2 14.7 15.2 16.2 18.3 20.7 22.9 24 OTHER CHARACTERISTICS Median Age (yrs.) 35 36.7 38.4 39.8 40 40.3 40.6 41.2 41.9 42.7 43.5 Age Span of Baby Boom (yrs.) 31-50 36-55 41-60 46-65 47-66 48-67 51-70 56-75 61-80 66-85 71-90 Families (000s) 2,933 3,191 3,422 3,612 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. Households (000s) 3,925 4,219 4,555 4,888 n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. n.a. REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION (%) GTA 43 44.5 45.8 47.2 47.4 47.6 48.3 49.1 50 50.8 51.5 Central 22.1 22.1 22 21.6 21.5 21.5 21.5 21.3 21.1 21 20.9 Eastern 13.8 13.5 13.2 13.2 13.2 13.1 12.9 12.9 12.9 12.8 12.7 Southwestern 13.4 13 12.6 12 11.9 11.8 11.6 11.2 10.9 10.5 10.2 Northeastern 5.4 4.8 4.5 4.3 4.2 4.2 4 3.8 3.6 3.4 3.2 Northwestern 2.3 2.1 1.9 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.4
  7. 7. 4 ECONOMIC TRENDS IN ONTARIO Below are highlights of the current economic trends in the province, published as Ontario Economic Accounts (Fourth Quarter, 2013) on the Ontario Ministry of Finance website. (http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/economy/ecaccs/) For more information, refer to Table 1 and 2 in Appendix  Ontario’s real GDP increased 1.3% in 2013, matching growth in 2012.  Final domestic demand rose 0.4% in 2013, slowing from growth of 1.3% in 2012.  Real consumer spending grew 1.8% in 2013, accelerating from a 1.4% increase in 2012. Personal spending on semi-durables (+3.2%) and durables (+2.5%) led growth while spending on non-durables (+1.6%) and services (+1.6%) also advanced. Consumer purchases of food and beverages, clothing and footwear, natural gas and electricity all increased in 2013, while spending on furniture and appliances and gasoline declined. Consumer spending on motor vehicles rose modestly in 2013.  Capital spending on machinery and equipment declined 3.8% in 2013, after rising 2.0% in 2012. Investment spending on non-residential construction decreased 8.0%, following a 1.6% decline in 2012.  Investment in residential construction fell 2.2% in 2013, the first annual decline since 2009. The decline was driven in large part by a 6.4% drop in new housing construction. Home owner transfer costs also decreased, falling by 1.0% in 2013 while renovations activity rose 1.7%.  Exports grew by 1.1%, while imports declined 0.6% in 2013. As a result, net trade made a significant contribution to overall growth.  Current dollar GDP increased 2.7% in 2013, following a 3.0% advance in 2012.  Employee compensation increased 2.7%, with wages and salaries rising 2.6%. Wages and salaries in the services-producing industries rose 2.8%, and were up by 2.0% in goods-producing industries in 2013.  Inflation, as measured by the implicit price index for GDP, slowed from 1.7% in 2012 to 1.3% in 2013. Consumer prices rose by 1.1%, easing from a 1.3% advance in 2012. Both export prices (+0.9%) and import prices (+1.6%) increased in 2013.  Household disposable income rose 2.6%, after increasing 2.5% in 2012. Ontario’s personal savings rate declined to 4.7% from 5.0% in 2012, as current dollar final consumption (+3.0%) grew at a faster pace than household disposable income in 2013.  The net operating surplus of corporations decreased by 1.3% in 2013, after falling 1.0% in 2012.  Real output measured on an industry basis rose 1.4% in 2013, matching the 2012 gain
  8. 8. 5 LEISURE TRENDS IN CANADA The demographic, social and economic trends are related to trends in leisure activities. The information below was taken from the Sport Participation Research Paper published in 2010 by Heritage Canada. (http://sirc.ca/online_resources/documents/SportParticipation%20Report%202013_EN_VF.pdf ) The data is based mainly on the data from General Social Survey from 1992, 1998, 2005 and 2010. There has been a decline is sport participation across the board and there are several factors that contribute to this trend as highlighted below in excerpt from that report. Current Status National sport participation rate continues to decline General Social Survey (GSS) Time-Use data shows that the national participation rate of Canadians age 15 years and older has been declining since 1992. In 2010, 7.2 million or 26% of Canadians age 15 and older participated regularly in sport. This represents a 19% decline over the past 18 years. Refer to Tables 3, 4 and 5 in the Appendix. Provincial/regional trend Participation in sport declined in all eastern provinces. The largest decline was recorded in Nova Scotia where participation fell by 11%, from 32% to 21%, between 2005 and 2010. Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Ontario, and New Brunswick also reported declining rates from 2005 levels: 9%, 8%, 1%, and 1% respectively. In Western Canada, Alberta reported increases in rates of participation from 2005 levels, a rise of 4%, followed by Manitoba (2%), and British Columbia (1%). Saskatchewan remained virtually unchanged at 0.2% (Table 3, p. 27). Refer to Chart 4 & Table 4 Gender gap in sport participation has increased Men are more likely to participate in sport on a regular basis than women. In 2010, approximately 1/3rd of Canadian men and 1/6th of Canadian women regularly participated in sport. Refer to Table 3 and Chart 1 Chart 2 - Changes in active leisure participation of Canadians on a given day from 1992 to 2010 (Sport Participation 2010 Research Report, 2013, Canadian Heritage)
  9. 9. 6 Chart 4 – Sport participation rates by province, 2005 and 2010 (Sport Participation 2010 Research Report, 2013, Canadian Heritage) Chart 1 – Counts and ratio of Canadian sport participants (Sport Participation 2010 Research Report, 2013, Canadian Heritage) Decreased sport participation across all age groups Sport participation tends to decrease as Canadians get older yet the participation rate of young Canadian adults is declining faster than that of older Canadians. In 2010, 54% of Canadians 15 to 19, 37% of Canadians 20 to 24, 29% of Canadians 25 to 34, 23% of Canadians 35 to 54, and 17% of Canadians 55 and older were regularly practicing sport. In comparison to 2005 these results represent a decrease of 4% for the 15 to 19 and 20 to 24 age groups; 2% for the 25 to 34 and 35 to 54 age groups; and 1% for the 55 and older age group. Refer to Chart 2 and Table 5
  10. 10. 7 Chart 2 - Changes in active leisure participation of Canadians on a given day from 1992 to 2010 (Sport Participation 2010 Research Report, 2013, Canadian Heritage) Participation highly concentrated in a few sports Canadians are active in many different sports but most sport participants practice only a select few on a regular basis including golf, ice hockey, and soccer. Gender seems to influence the choice of sport. While men tend to prefer the three aforementioned sports, women participate more in golf, soccer, and swimming. Refer to Chart 6, Table 8 & 9 Students are the most active in sport, followed by full-time workers In 2010, students (with or without employment) had the highest rate of participation in sport at 46% regularly engaging in sport, which is down from 51% in 2005. During this period, participation by male students increased by 6% to 65%, while participation by female students fell by 18%, from 44% in 2005 to 26% in 2010 (Table 6, p. 28-29). Refer to Chart 5, 6, Table 8 & 9 Students participate in sport in greater numbers than any labour force group Almost half of students (15 years and older) participate in sport on a regular basis compared to 31% of part-time workers, 27% of full-time workers, and 17% of unemployed people. Refer to Chart 5 Chart 5 – Sport participation rates by labour force status, 1992, 1998, 2005, and 2010 (Sport Participation 2010 Research Report, 2013, Canadian Heritage)
  11. 11. 8 Chart 6 – Participation rate in the top ten sports among sport participants, 1992, 1998, 2005, and 2010 (Sport Participation 2010 Research Report, 2013, Canadian Heritage) Established immigrants participate in sport less than recent immigrants and Canadian born Immigrants who came to Canada after 1990 (29%) tend to participate regularly in sport and at the same rate as Canadian born (27%). Conversely, established immigrants are less likely to engage in sport activities; 16% of immigrants who moved to Canada before 1990 participate regularly in sport. Refer to Table 6 Soccer is the most played sport by Canadian children One in four GSS respondents reported having at least one child (5 to 14 years old) living in the household playing soccer on a regular basis. The next two most popular sports are swimming (24%) and ice hockey (22%). Refer to Chart 7, Table 10 & 11 Chart 7 – Sport participation for top 10 most practiced sports among children participants, 2010 (Sport Participation 2010 Research Report, 2013, Canadian Heritage) Women are more likely than men to have a coach Female sport participants tend to use the services of a coach more often than male sport participants and this difference appears to increase as people age. For example, two-thirds of young male and female adults (15 to 19 years old) have a coach, compared to one-fifth of men and one-third of women in their early twenties. And the data shows that 12% of women who are 55 years or older have a coach while 4% of male sport participants in the same age group have one.
  12. 12. 9 Increased number of Canadians involved in amateur sport as coaches, referees, administrators, and spectators. Indirect involvement in sport has been increasing over the past 20 years. In 2010, 40% of Canadians reported being a spectator of amateur sport events while 7% of men and women helped with administration, 2% were involved in officiating, and 5% were involved as a coach. Most important benefit of sport participation is relaxation and fun. Among the benefits of sport participation recognized by Canadians, relaxation and fun were ranked as being important by 97% of sport participants. Health and fitness were the most important benefits of sport for participants age 15 to 19 and these outcomes were recognized as very important by the majority of sport participants from the other age groups as well. Finally, women attached greater importance to family activities and making new friends than men did. Sport participation perceived as improving health and life satisfaction. Concerning physical and mental health, sport participants have a more positive self-assessment than non- participants. Additionally, sport-participants are more likely to be satisfied with their lives than non-participants. Factors that Impact Sport Participation According to the General Social Survey and the Sport Participation Report, the following factors seem to influence sport participation. Education level impacts sport participation. In general, individuals with higher levels of education are more likely to participate in sport. Close to 1/3rd of university graduates practice sport on a regular basis compared to 25% of Canadians who have a post-secondary diploma and/or some university, and 22% of individuals who report being in the “some college/trade/high school diploma” category. Higher income earners more likely to participate in sport. Sport participants are more likely to be found in the higher household income categories than in the lower household income categories. Fewer than 10% individuals with a household income of less than $20,000 per year participate in sport, compared to 15% of Canadians with a household income in the range of $20,000 to $29,999 and approximately one in five Canadians with a household income of $30,000 to $49,999 or $50,000 to $79,999. 1/3rd of individuals with a household income higher than $80,000 engage regularly in sport. Household income influences children’s participation in sport. While the great majority of children from families with an annual income over $80,000 participate in sport on a regular basis, 70% children from a middle income family and 60% children from a lower income family also engage in sport on a regular basis. Age is an indicator of tournament participation. In 2010, 11% of Canadians participated in sport tournaments. Participation in tournaments is highest among young sport participants. Six out of ten sport participants age 15 to 19 participated in tournaments compared to 35% to 40% of sport participants belonging to other age groups. However, participation in tournaments is increasing among older sport participants compared to previous GSS years.
  13. 13. 10 Gender, household composition, educational attainment, and household income. These factors are most notable when participation in sport competes with domestic responsibilities, child rearing, work-related activities, and participation in other leisure time activities. Household income and the level of education of household members also have an impact on sport participation. Reasons for Decline in Participation Lack of time and interest are the main reasons for not participating in sport. Leisure time has been decreasing for Canadians over the past 20 years; therefore it is not surprising to see that lack of time is the most common reason for not participating in sport on a regular basis. Non-participants who said they did not have time to participate in sport generally work (paid work and household work) more hours than non- participants who gave other reasons for non-participation. Refer to Chart 8 Chart 8 – Average time per day spent on various activities by male and female non-participants, 2010 (Sport Participation 2010 Research Report, 2013, Canadian Heritage) Canada’s aging population. Active participation in sport decreases with age are perhaps the most important. This increase in the proportion of seniors is mainly a result of lower rates of natural increase and longer life expectancy. Leisure time has decreased. The leisure time of Canadians (which is the residual of the 24-hour day that is not allocated to paid and unpaid work or personal care) declined 7% from 6.1 hours per day in 1992 to 5.7 hours per day in 2010. This represents a leisure time loss of twenty-four minutes per day (Table 28, p. 77). This loss can be contrasted with an increase in the number of leisure activities available to Canadians. These activities range from going to the movies or watching television to various hobbies, sport, socializing, attending a performing arts event, reading or gardening, surfing the Internet and chatting online. The active leisure time of Canadians (the part of ‘free time’ that is not dedicated to civic and voluntary activity, socializing, television, movies, reading or other passive leisure activity) increased from 2005 from 1.1 hours to 1.2 in 2010. However, this increase of 6 minutes per day allocated in active leisure was dedicated to non-sport activity which leaves the time allocated to active sport at 30 minutes per day, the same as in 2005. The increasing popularity of walking, jogging, and exercises that are not included in the definition of active sport could explain this rise in time allocated to active leisure. Refer to Chart 9, Table 13 & 14
  14. 14. 11 Chart 9 – Reasons for non-participation, 2010 (Sport Participation 2010 Research Report, 2013, Canadian Heritage) Chart 10 – Average free time per day by sport participation, 2010 (Sport Participation 2010 Research Report, 2013, Canadian Heritage)
  15. 15. 12 Summary of Demographic, Economic, Social and Leisure Trends In summary, sport participation is in decline across the board. In terms of demographics, we see an aging population in the province and that contributes to lower participation in sports. The stats show a lower participation rate for higher age groups and that rate is also on the decline. Ontario’s population growth rate is on the decline with majority of the growth resulting from migration. The GTA is expected to outgrow other regions of the province in population numbers. Our economy is steady, while provincial GDP has grown steadily, personal spending and household income are on the rise. On the other end we see that almost 60% of employed people in the province earn less than $50,000 annually. Sport participation continues to decline regardless of its perceived benefits. Participation has been hit all across the country as a result of changing demographics and lifestyle. We have an aging population. The younger population has the highest percent participation in sport but as majority of them are students, we see a lack of leisure tie they have on their disposal as sports competes with other activities for a smaller time frame in an average day and level of interest. The reality is that sport is only one of many possible leisure time activities that Canadians have to choose from and choosing sport is further constrained by factors including age, gender, household composition and income.
  16. 16. 13 SQUASH ONTARIO PARTICIPATION TRENDS 2009-2014 JUNIOR PARTICIPATION For a more detailed breakdown refer to Table 18 in the Appendix TRENDS IN ENTRIES TOTAL PARTICIPATION - Juniors Season Boys Girls Total 2009-2010 1012 419 1431 2010-2011 1060 443 1503 2011-2012 1112 414 1526 2012-2013 1140 416 1556 2013-2014 1154 431 1585 GOLD PARTICIPATION - Juniors Season Boys Girls Total 2009-2010 305 147 452 2010-2011 324 167 491 2011-2012 307 149 456 2012-2013 346 166 512 2013-2014 384 157 541 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 Junior Participation 2009-2014 Boys Girls Total 0 200 400 600 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 Gold Participation Juniors - 2009- 2014 Boys Girls Total
  17. 17. 14 SILVER PARTICIPATION - Juniors Season Boys Girls Total 2009-2010 523 172 695 2010-2011 530 186 716 2011-2012 616 165 781 2012-2013 589 140 729 2013-2014 567 167 734 ONTARIO PARTICIPATION - Juniors Season Boys Girls Total 2009-2010 184 100 284 2010-2011 206 90 296 2011-2012 189 100 289 2012-2013 205 110 315 2013-2014 203 107 310 TOTAL PARTICIPATION Juniors Season Total Gold Silver Ontario 2009-2010 1431 452 695 284 2010-2011 1503 491 716 296 2011-2012 1526 456 781 289 2012-2013 1556 512 729 315 2013-2014 1585 541 734 310 0 500 1000 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 Silver Participation Juniors - 2009- 2014 Boys Girls Total 0 100 200 300 400 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 Ontario Participation - Juniors - 2009-2014 Boys Girls Total 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 Total Participation - 2009-2014 Total Gold Silver Ontario
  18. 18. 15 2013-2014 INDIVIDUAL JUNIOR PLAYERS Overall Ontario Gold Silver Total 444 Total 208 TOTAL 229 Total 326 Male 332 Male 139 Male 165 Male 249 Female 112 Female 69 Female 64 Female 77 Average Age 13.4 Average Age 14.2 Average Age 14.29 Average Age 12.68 Median Age 13.42 Median Age 14.33 Median 14.46 Media Age 12.89 U11 91 U11 26 U11 31 U11 84 U13 101 U13 40 U13 39 U13 89 U15 130 U15 63 U15 66 U15 102 U17 78 U17 47 U17 52 U17 51 U19 44 U19 32 U19 41 Individual Junior Players by Clubs Overall Ontario Gold Silver The Club at White Oaks 48 National Squash Academy 24 The Club at White Oaks 28 The Club at White Oaks 35 National Squash Academy 42 Executive Squash & Fitness Club 24 National Squash Academy 27 Granite Club 28 Granite Club 35 The Club at White Oaks 21 Out of Province 21 National Squash Academy 28 Executive Squash & Fitness Club 29 Granite Club 18 Granite Club 20 Toronto Lawn Tennis Club 24 Toronto Lawn 29 Out of Province 17 Executive Squash 19 Toronto Cricket 21 Toronto Cricket, Skating & Curling Club 23 Badminton & Racquet Club 11 Ottawa Athletic Club 15 Royal Canadian Yacht Club 19 Out of Province 23 Mayfair Parkway 11 Badminton & Racquet Club 11 Mississauga Life Time Athletic 16 Royal Canadian Yacht Club 21 Toronto Lawn Tennis Club 10 Mayfair Parkway 10 Executive Squash & Fitness Club 15 Badminton & Racquet Club 17 Windsor Squash & Fitness Club 9 Toronto Lawn Tennis Club 10 Windsor Squash & Fitness Club 14 Windsor Squash & Fitness Club 17 Toronto Cricket, Skating & Curling Club 8 Ontario Racquet Club 8 Mayfair Parkway 13 Mayfair Parkway 17 Club Meadowvale 7 Windsor Squash & Fitness Club 8 Ontario 13 Mississauga Life Time Athletic 16 Ontario Racquet Club 7 Toronto Cricket, Skating & Curling Club 6 Badminton & Racquet Club 12 Ottawa Athletic Club 15 Ottawa Athletic Club 6 Club Meadowvale 4 Club Meadowvale 12 Club Meadowvale 14 Kitchener-Waterloo Racquet Club 4 Kitchener-Waterloo Racquet Club 4 London Squash & Fitness Club 9 London Squash & Fitness Club 14 Barrie Athletic Club 3 Barrie Athletic Club 3 Ontario Racquet Club 9 Ontario Racquet Club 13 Cedar Springs Health, Racquet & Sports Club 3 London Squash & Fitness Club 3 Glendon Athletic Club 6 Glendon Athletic Club 7 London Squash & Fitness Club 3 Ontario 3 Mayfair Lakeshore 6 Kitchener-Waterloo Racquet Club 6 Canada Games Complex 2 Cedar Springs Health, Racquet & Sports Club 2 Kitchener-Waterloo Racquet Club 4
  19. 19. 16 Mayfair Lakeshore 6 Mayfair Lakeshore 2 Out-of-Province Clubs 2 Ottawa Athletic Club 4 Barrie Athletic Club 5 Terry Fox Fitness Centre 2 RA Squash Club 2 Barrie Athletic Club 3 Elora Racquets and Fitness Club 4 YMCA of North Bay and District 2 Royal Canadian Yacht Club 2 Elora Racquets and Fitness Club 3 Urban Squash Toronto 3 YMCA-YWCA Guelph 2 St. Andrew's College 2 Urban Squash Toronto 3 YMCA Sudbury 3 Calgary Winter Club 1 Terry Fox Fitness Centre 2 YMCA Sudbury 3 Burlington Fitness & Racquet Club 2 Elora Racquets and Fitness Club 1 YMCA of North Bay and District 2 Burlington Fitness & Racquet Club 2 Cedar Springs Health, Racquet & Sports Club 2 Glendon Athletic Club 1 YMCA-YWCA Guelph 2 Goodlife Fitness Club - Dunfield 2 Goodlife Fitness Club - Dunfield 2 Headwaters Racquet Club 1 Barrhaven Squash Club 1 Ontario Club 2 Pickering Recreation Complex 2 Kingston Garrison Squash Club 1 Elora Racquets and Fitness Club 1 Pickering Recreation Complex 2 RA Squash Club 2 McMaster University Athletics 1 Glendon Athletic Club 1 Sarnia Riding Club 2 Richmond Hill Squash Club 2 Mississauga Life Time Athletic 1 Headwaters Racquet Club 1 Terry Fox Fitness Centre 2 Sarnia Riding Club 2 Pickering Recreation Complex 1 Kingston Garrison Squash Club 1 Toronto Racquet Club 2 St. Andrew's College 2 St. Andrew's College 1 McMaster University 1 YMCA of North Bay 2 Terry Fox Fitness Centre 2 Stratford Country Club 1 Mississauga Life Time Athletic 1 Ajax Squash Club 1 Toronto Racquet Club 2 The Oakville Club 1 Pickering Recreation Complex 1 Cedar Springs Health, Racquet & Sports Club 1 YMCA of North Bay and District 2 YMCA Sudbury 1 Sarnia Riding Club 1 Delta Fitness and Squash Club 1 YMCA-YWCA Guelph 2 Stratford Country Club 1 Glen Abbey Community Centre 1 Ajax Squash Club 1 The Oakville Club 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - Parkview 1 Barrhaven Squash Club 1 Toronto Racquet Club 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - Valhalla 1 Delta Fitness and Squash Club 1 YMCA Sudbury 1 Headwaters Racquet Club 1 Glen Abbey Community Centre 1 McMaster University Athletics and Recreation 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - Parkview 1 Richmond Hill Squash Club 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - Valhalla 1 YMCA St. Catharines 1 Headwaters Racquet Club 1 Kingston Garrison Squash Club 1 McMaster University 1 Club Markham 1 Stratford Country Club 1 The Oakville Club 1 YMCA St. Catharines 1
  20. 20. 17 DOUBLES PARTICIPATION ONTARIO & SANCTION EVENTS For more detailed breakdown view Table 16 in the Appendix TRENDS IN ENTRIES DOUBLES PARTICIPATION Season Total Male Female 2009-2010 302 206 96 2010-2011 288 193 95 2011-2012 304 218 86 2012-2013 312 213 99 2013-2014 250 160 90 INDIVIDUAL DOUBLES PLAYERS 2013-2014 Doubles Participation Breakdown 2013-2014 Overall Ontario Championships Sanction Events Total 249 Total 197 Total 82 Male 183 Male 140 Male 58 Female 65 Female 57 Female 24 Adults 239 Adults 195 Adult 75 Juniors 9 Juniors 2 Junior 7 Individual Doubles Players by Clubs Overall Ontario Championships Sanction Events Total 249 Total 197 Total 82 Male 183 Male 140 Male 58 Female 65 Female 57 Female 24 Adults 239 Adults 195 Adult 75 Juniors 9 Juniors 2 Junior 7 Toronto Cricket, Skating & Curling Club 44 Toronto Cricket, Skating & Curling Club 44 Pickering Recreation Complex 18 Toronto Racquet Club 32 Toronto Racquet Club 32 Mayfair Lakeshore 17 0 100 200 300 400 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 Doubles Participation - Ontario Championships 2009 - 2014 Total Male Female
  21. 21. 18 Mayfair Lakeshore 23 Mayfair Lakeshore 18 Ontario 10 Pickering Recreation Complex 18 Cedar Springs Health, Racquet & Sports Club 14 Mayfair Parkway 9 Mayfair Parkway 15 Granite Club 12 GoodLife Fitness Club - Parkview 4 Cedar Springs Health, Racquet & Sports Club 14 Mayfair Parkway 10 National Squash Academy 4 Ontario 13 Badminton & Racquet Club 8 Granite Club 3 Granite Club 12 National Squash Academy 8 Headwaters Racquet Club 2 National Squash Academy 10 Royal Canadian Yacht Club 7 London Squash & Fitness Club 2 Badminton & Racquet Club 8 Out Of Province 7 Sarnia Riding Club 2 Out Of Province 7 The Cambridge Club 7 Toronto Cricket, Skating & Curling Club 2 The Cambridge Club 7 Ontario Racquet Club 5 Burlington Fitness & Racquet Club 1 Royal Canadian Yacht Club 7 London Squash & Fitness Club 3 GoodLife Fitness Club - CitiPlaza 1 London Squash & Fitness Club 5 Ontario 3 Kitchener-Waterloo Racquet Club 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - Parkview 5 Pickering Recreation Complex 3 McMaster University 1 Ontario Racquet Club 5 Kitchener-Waterloo Racquet Club 2 Goodlife Fitness Club - Dunfield 1 Kitchener-Waterloo Racquet Club 3 Toronto Lawn Tennis Club 2 The Cambridge Club 1 Sarnia Riding Club 2 Burlington Racquet and Fitness Club 1 Toronto Athletic Club 1 Toronto Lawn Tennis Club 2 GoodLife Fitness Club - McCaul 1 Toronto Lawn Tennis Club 1 Headwaters Racquet Club 2 GoodLife Fitness Club - Parkview 1 Toronto Racquet Club 1 Ontario Club 0 Headwaters Racquet Club 1 Burlington Fitness & Racquet Club 1 Mayfair West 1 Mayfair West 1 McMaster University 1 Toronto Athletic Club 1 TAG Fitness & Squash 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - CitiPlaza 1 Toronto Athletic Club 1 McMaster University 1 Windsor Squash & Fitness Club 1 Burlington Racquet and Fitness Club 1 Windsor Squash & Fitness Club 1 TAG Fitness & Squash 1
  22. 22. 19 ADULTS & MASTERS PARTICIPATION ONTARIO CHAMPIONSHIPS For more detailed breakdown, refer to Table 17 in the Appendix Adult & Masters Participation Ontario Championships 2009- 2014 Season Total Male Female 2009-2010 326 257 69 2010-2011 421 341 80 2011-2012 383 304 79 2012-2013 399 304 95 2013-2014 355 282 73 2013-2014 INDIVIDUAL ADULTS AND MASTERS PLAYERS Total 258 Male 210 Female 48 Adults 231 Juniors 27 INDIVIDUAL MASTERS AND SINGLES PLAYERS BY CLUBS National Squash Academy 27 University Of Waterloo 2 Mayfair Lakeshore 18 GoodLife Fitness Club - Square One 2 Mayfair Parkway 16 Jim Archdekin Recreation Centre 2 Executive Squash & Fitness 10 GoodLife Fitness Club - CitiPlaza 2 The Club at White Oaks 8 Northfield Racquet Club 2 Out of Province 8 Fit City Health Centre 2 Barrie Athletic Club 8 One Health Club 2 London Squash & Fitness Club 7 Aurora Family Leisure Complex 2 Adelaide Club 7 RA Squash Club 2 Headwaters Racquet Club 7 Guelph Athletic Club 2 Toronto Lawn Tennis Club 6 Toronto Cricket Skating and Curling Club 2 GoodLife Fitness Club - Parkview 6 Georgetown Racquet Club 2 Richmond Hill Squash Club 6 University of Western Ontario 1 0 100 200 300 400 500 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 Adult & Masters Participation Ontario Championships 2009-2014 Total Male Female
  23. 23. 20 Ontario Racquet Club 5 Huron Oaks Squash Club 1 Ontario 5 British Columbia Club 1 Pickering Recreation Complex 5 University Of Guelph Squash Club 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - Valhalla 5 Riverstone Golf and Country Club 1 Badminton & Racquet Club 4 County Club Squash & Fitness 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - Dunfield 4 Dixie Squash Club 1 Cedar Springs Health, Racquet & Sports Club 4 YMCA-YWCA Guelph 1 Durham College - UOIT 4 Kitchener-Waterloo Racquet Club 1 Toronto Racquet Club 4 Terry Fox Fitness Centre 1 Toronto Athletic Club 4 Glen Abbey Community Centre 1 Peterborough Squash Club 4 Glendon Athletic Club 1 Granite Club 3 GoodLife Fitness Club - Waterloo 1 Kingston Garrison Squash Club 3 Mississauga Lifetime Athletic 1 University Of Toronto 3 CFB North Bay - Fitness & Wellness Centre 1 The Cambridge Club 3 Meadowvale Community Centre 1 Burlington Fitness & Racquet Club 3 Parkway Health Racquet Club 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - McCaul Queen St. West Coed 3 Club Markham 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - Northridge 3 CFB Borden - PSP Fitness & Sports 1 YMCA Sudbury 3 Royal Canadian Yacht Club 1 Elora Racquets and Fitness Club 3 Club Meadowvale 3 Toronto Cricket, Skating & Curling Club 2
  24. 24. 21 SANCTION EVENT PARTICIPATION INDIVIDUAL PLAYERS IN SANCTION TOURNAMENTS 2013-2014 Total 652 Male Total 485 Female Total 166 Male Juniors 55 Female Juniors 25 Average Age 37.31 Median Age 36.7 Top 10 Clubs by participation in Ontario Championships Account Only - Club not specified 161 Riverstone Golf & Country Club 2 The Club at White Oaks 42 Royal Canadian Yacht Club 2 Pickering Recreation Complex 36 Sunshine Racquet & Fitness Club 2 Mayfair Lakeshore 30 University Of Waterloo 2 National Squash Academy 26 Vitality Plus 2 Barrie Athletic Club 25 YMCA of Central East Ontario - Peterborough 2 Headwaters Racquet Club 22 YMCA St. Catharines - Walker Family Branch 2 YMCA Sudbury 23 Arnprior Squash Club 1 Mayfair Parkway 21 Riverstone Golf & Country Club 2 London Squash & Fitness Club 16 Royal Canadian Yacht Club 2 Executive Squash & Fitness Club 14 Sunshine Racquet & Fitness Club 2 GoodLife Fitness Club - Parkview 14 University Of Waterloo 2 Peterborough Squash Club 13 Brock University 2 Adelaide Club 10 Balmy Beach 1 McMaster University 9 Campbellford & District Curling & Racquet Club 1 Burlington Fitness & Racquet Club 8 Club Markham 1 Fit City Health Centre 7 County Club Squash & Fitness 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - Valhalla 7 Crescent Town Squash Club 1 Kingston Garrison Squash Club 6 Elora Racquets and Fitness Club 1 One Health Club 6 GoodLife - Queensview 1 Brantford Athletic Club 5 Guelph Athletic Club 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - McCaul 5 Howard Armstrong Rec. Centre 1 The Cambridge Club 5 Huron Oaks Squash Club 1 Ajax Squash Club 4 International players 1 Aurora Family Leisure Complex 4 Lakeshore Recreation 1
  25. 25. 22 British Columbia 4 London Squash and Fitness 1 Club Meadowvale 4 McMaster University 1 Durham College - UOIT 4 Mississauga Lifetime Fitness 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - Club One 4 Moncton 1 Goodlife Fitness Club - Dunfield 4 NDHQ Squash 1 Kitchener-Waterloo Racquet Club 4 Prince Edward Fitness & Aquatic Centre 1 Sarnia Riding Club 4 Queen's University Squash Club 1 Toronto Lawn Tennis Club 4 Richmond Hill Squash Club 1 YMCA of Sudbury 4 Ridley College 1 Cedar Springs Health, Racquet & Sports Club 3 River Grove Community Centre 1 Delta Fitness and Squash Club 3 Squash Alberta Club 1 Georgetown Racquet Club 3 St Thomas Health Club 1 GoodLife Fitness Club - CitiPlaza 3 Terry Fox Fitness Centre 1 Granite Club 3 Toronto Racquet Club 1 LA Fitness 3 University Of Guelph 1 Toronto Cricket, Skating & Curling Club 3 University Of Toronto 1 Ottawa Athletic Club 3 YMCA Kingston Family 1 Out-of-Province Clubs 3 YMCA Niagara Falls 1 Stratford Country Club 3 YMCA North York 1 Toronto Athletic Club 3 YMCA of London - Centre Branch 1 YMCA of Cambridge 3 YMCA West End 1 Clarington Squash Club 2 Glen Abbey Community Centre 2 GoodLife Fitness Club - Waterloo 2
  26. 26. 23 LEAGUE PARTICIPATION Western Region League Teams: 24 Divisions: B, C and D Total players: 6 to 8 players per team. 144 to 196 players in total Trend: Steady at around 24 teams last few years. Toronto & District Men’s League Teams: 130 teams approximately – Winter and Summer combined Divisions: Division 1, 2, 3 Masters B, C and just added Friday night league (Division 4) Total Players: 800-900 approximately including Winter and Summer season Trend: A drop in player numbers last 5 years but has been stable otherwise. Toronto & District Women’s League Teams: 36 Divisions: A, B, C, D & E (E folded halfway through season this year) Total Players: 143 in 2013 Winter Season, Trend: Steady but slightly up this year South Western Region League Teams: 24 Divisions: A/B, C and D Total Players: 196 Trend: Massive increase from last year 50, league was not functioning before. Ottawa & District League Teams: 36 Divisions: Division 1 to 6 Total Players: 144 minimum Sudbury City League Teams: 8 Teams Divisions: One division, 7 players on each team playing in order of skill level Total Players: 56 and spares Trend: Steady at 8 Teams, people who don’t make it to a team are added to spares Central Ontario Squash League East Teams: 20 East (Kingston Area), 11 North (Peterborough Area) Divisions: A, B, C, D offered in Kingston region – B, C in North Total Players: 183, Women’s League just starting with 50 players – East 44 players in North Trend: East - Upper level divisions stagnant, C & D are growing with beginner players. Queens University courts are really busy. North - Steady at 11 teams, a few teams interested in joining may be 12 next year. It is growing more, looking at offering D next year. Peterborough YMCA uncooperative in offering sufficient court times. Y’s team play most home matches in different clubs.
  27. 27. 24 Ontario Squash Doubles League: Teams: 46 Divisions: Division 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 Total Players: Over 600 Trend: League has been growing in the last three years. T&D Women’s Doubles League: Teams: 6 teams Divisions: 1 Total Players: 70 Trend: Slight decline. In previous years has 8-10 teams. Black Knight T&D Junior Mixed League Teams: 27 Teams Divisions: U11, U13, U15, U17 and U19 Total Players: 196 Trend: League is growing with highest number of teams in the league this year. Niagara Region League: Teams: 27 Teams (2013/2014) Divisions: Mens 1, Mens 2, Mens 3, Womens. Total Players: 116 Trend: Slight decline in participation. 120 players and 28 teams (2012/2013). 124 players and 29 teams (2011/2012) SQUASH COURTS IN ONTARIO International Courts 426 Converted 14 North American 196 SB Doubles 3 North American Doubles: 30 Total Courts 662 Courts built in last 2-3 years in Ontario clubs and facilities 39 Clubs closed last three years 3 Canadian Squash & Fitness: 3 courts The Harbour Club: 3 courts Physio Med Fitness Airport (prev. Premier Fitness): 6 courts
  28. 28. 25 SQUASH EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS & RETAILERS REPORT Black Knight: Sales are slightly up recently. Overall trend is even with a slight increase. Main sellers are racquets and eye guards. Eye guards’ sales are up as badminton now requires them. Dunlop: Trend towards light racquets. Sales are stable, HD Brown is growing in terms of market share. Sales are better in accessories. Junior squash is on upswing. Dunlop is a heritage brand, faces more competition in tennis than squash. Asics: Main supplier of indoor sport shoes Blast, Domain, Blade, and Flashpoint are good sellers Oliver: Started a few years ago and has grown really fast across Canada. Looking to expand into the GTA. Pro shops are getting smaller as increasing trend to purchase equipment online. Harrow: Expects to see more junior teams and youth groups buying through pro shops – team uniforms and bag sales are up. Big box stores not supporting squash but still expecting growth. All points to stable to moderate growth. Head: Decline in sales. No growth or sales through retail or pro shops. Too many companies selling directly to players. Squash Unlimited (Kingston): Growth in beginner and intermediate squash players in the region due to Queens University squash courts, 85% usage rate. Growth in low to mid-level racquets and shoes. Majority of sales are online as trend is to buy with convenience. Racquets are tested before being added to sale on shop and online. Tecnifibre: Growing in Canada, growth in racquet and string sales. Quite a few Canadian players are sponsored. 80% of business through pro shops and retailers, rest through player packages and sponsorships. No website to sell directly, 4 online retail websites sell their products. Wilson: Sales stables over the last few years, challenging with online sales, economic environment has made it difficult. Holding our own and looking grow our business. Squash looks solid to stable, in private clubs squash it is holding its own. University courts are really well utilised. Karakal: In terms of sales, last few years have been steady, slight decline so far this year. A few more racquet companies have entered the market and there is a decline in participation. 60% sales through proshops and rest are online form the website.
  29. 29. 26 SQUASH PARTICIPATION BY LOCATION IN THE PROVINCE CURRENT ONTARIO MEMBERS
  30. 30. 27 INDIVIDUAL SQUASH PLAYERS
  31. 31. 28 INDIVIDUAL DOUBLES PLAYERS INDIVIDUAL ONTARIO CHAMPIONSHIP PLAYERS
  32. 32. 29 INDIVIDUAL JUNIOR SQUASH PLAYERS
  33. 33. 30 OBSERVATIONS Over the past 5 years, participation in squash has shown a slight decline with primary reasons being a lack of leisure time, economy and personal commitments. Interestingly enough, this trend is apparent in the volunteer area of many not for profit organizations. In gathering information from our regional league organizers, we found that numbers have remained steady; however, there has been a significant growth in the Ontario Squash Doubles League which now boasts over 700 players. Participation in competitions at the junior level has increased while participation in the adult competitions has remained steady. Several squash facilities have closed their doors (Kanata, Belleville as examples) but at the same time, we have seen 39 courts added with more new courts on the drawing board in Toronto and Oakville. Opportunities 1. The Baby Boomers - opportunities awaits recreation professionals who anticipate and plan for the leisure challenges of the boomer cohort  Boomers are concerned about chronic disease and have a desire to do whatever is possible to postpone physical aging.  Boomers have increasing amounts of discretionary money as a result of escalating earning power, inheritances, and return on investments (this is true for many of them, but not all).  Boomers will need support as they enter into an evident new adult life (retirement) with its own challenges and opportunities.  Boomers are undergoing a psychological shift, from a desire to acquire material possessions toward a desire to purchase enjoyable and satisfying experiences, particularly in leisure.  Boomers have a continued absence of disposable time due to complex lifestyles; however, their perspective on leisure as a necessity will remain. 2. Schools  Connecting local schools in close proximity to your club has shown to greatly enhance existing junior programs or jump starting new ones.  Canada recently scored a D- in an international report including 14 other counties on Physical Activity for Children and Youth  Targeting schools with kid-specific marketing materials along with trail offers will help get new younger players in the doors  The University Squash League is growing from player participation standpoint through the introduction of ‘Varsity Squash’ on several campuses.
  34. 34. 31 3. New Events to Increase Participation and Populate Courts  Squash Ontario has created ‘1 Day’ events as part of the Junior Competition circuit as a way of attracting new grassroots players who are not yet prepared to commit to a full weekend tournament.  These are regional events with capped entry which allow smaller clubs with fewer courts to bid on and host sanctioned junior events that were previously unavailable to them.  This model is being integrated into our Senior Singles and Doubles calendar for the 2014-15 season.  The Masters program is also moving towards more level based competition to increase participation numbers versus aged based play  The Regional Masters Team event has developed quickly as a key event on the squash calendar, players are keen to play in a team format with players from their own clubs/regions 4. Technology/Software  Technology provides an opportunity to reach out and connect regional leagues through rankings and ratings programs, Squash Ontario is seeking to connect the existing league results into the overall ranking system  Clubs with in house ranking programs are better able to serve their membership as players can easily find their level and most importantly people of equal skill level to play  The need for more reliable rating systems would help improve the integrity of inter club competition and club house league play by connecting the average squash player to the big picture of squash in Ontario.
  35. 35. 32 APPENDIX Table 1 - ONTARIO ECONOMIC ACCOUNTS: HIGHLIGHTS http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/economy/ecaccts/ (% change from previous period) 2012 2013 2013q1 2013q2 2013q3 2013q4 Real GDP (Chained $ 2007) 1.3 1.3 0.3 0.8 0.5 0.5 (annualized rate) 1.1 3.1 2.0 1.9 Household spending 1.4 1.8 0.4 0.8 0.7 0.3 Government current spending 1.4 0.0 -0.1 0.5 0.3 0.2 Residential construction 4.7 -2.2 0.8 -0.8 -2.5 -0.6 Non-residential construction -1.6 -8.0 -3.3 -1.4 -1.4 -3.1 Machinery & equipment 2.0 -3.8 -4.1 -0.8 -2.0 -3.4 Intellectual property products -1.7 -6.5 -3.2 -2.2 1.4 -2.7 Final Domestic Demand 1.3 0.4 -0.1 0.3 0.2 -0.2 Exports 1.7 1.1 1.5 3.2 -1.1 0.8 Imports 2.0 -0.6 0.1 1.4 -1.2 0.7 Change in Business inventories (Chained $2007 billions) 4.1 3.6 3.5 1.0 2.9 6.9 Nominal GDP ($ Current) 3.0 2.7 1.0 0.4 0.6 0.7 Net operating surplus for corporations -1.0 -1.3 1.7 -2.3 0.4 0.5 Primary household income 3.4 2.9 1.3 0.4 0.4 0.8 Household disposable income 2.5 2.6 1.2 0.2 0.6 0.7 Implicit price index, GDP 1.7 1.3 0.7 -0.4 0.1 0.2 Table 2 - Annual Income Estimates for Census Families and Individuals (T1 Family File) Persons with income: 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Total persons with income 9222090 9363100 9487810 9627930 9741870 Persons with income under $5,000 830210 9.00% 845850 9.03% 888840 9.37% 891310 9.26% 872840 8.96% $5,000 and $9,999 815130 8.84% 800370 8.55% 799510 8.43% 737790 7.66% 713400 7.32% $10,000 and $14,999 892470 9.68% 880800 9.41% 906900 9.56% 948450 9.85% 935960 9.61% $15,000 and $19,999 869650 9.43% 871050 9.30% 882150 9.30% 922670 9.58% 917710 9.42% $20,000 and $24,999 704480 7.64% 713700 7.62% 736800 7.77% 752700 7.82% 771350 7.92% $25,000 and $34,999 1190940 12.91% 1182460 12.63% 1196710 12.61% 1189450 12.35% 1196060 12.28% $35,000 and $49,999 1455600 15.78% 1468930 15.69% 1472870 15.52% 1471300 15.28% 1482520 15.22% $50,000 and $74,999 1329040 14.41% 1374810 14.68% 1372190 14.46% 1408470 14.63% 1448000 14.86% $75,000 and $99,999 613600 6.65% 660060 7.05% 665470 7.01% 702990 7.30% 745510 7.65% $100,000 and $149,999 328330 3.56% 359990 3.84% 363210 3.83% 390420 4.06% 427210 4.39% $150,000 and $199,999 85580 0.93% 93670 1.00% 95480 1.01% 100120 1.04% 109120 1.12% $200,000 and $249,999 35230 0.38% 38020 0.41% 37900 0.40% 39400 0.41% 43820 0.45% $250,000 and over 71830 0.78% 73390 0.78% 69790 0.74% 72850 0.76% 78370 0.80% Median total income (dollars) $29080 $29700 $29280 $29520 $30290
  36. 36. 33 Table 3 – Adult Canadians regularly participating in sport by sex, 1992, 1998, 2005, and 2010 Table 4 - Adult Canadians regularly participating in sport by provinces, 1992, 1998, 2005, and 2010
  37. 37. 34 Table 5 – Adult Canadians regularly participating in sport by age groups, 1992, 1998, 2005, and 2010 Table 6 – Adult Canadians regularly participating in sport by year of immigration, Canada, 2010
  38. 38. 35 Table 7 – Profile of Canadians who regularly participated in sport, 2010
  39. 39. 36 Table 8 – Most practiced sports by Canadians, 2010 Table 9 – Frequency of participation of the top 20 most practiced sports among sport participants by sex, 2010
  40. 40. 37 Table 10 – Most practiced sports by children age 5 to 14 years old
  41. 41. 38 Table 11 – Most played sports by Canadians (15 years and older) who participated in tournaments, by sports and sex
  42. 42. 39 Table 12 – Profile of Canadians who participated in tournaments, 2010
  43. 43. 40 Table 13 – Average time spent per day on various activities (sport participants) by family income, 2010 Table 14 – Average time spent per day on various activities (sport participants) by province, 2010
  44. 44. 41 Table 15 – Reasons for non-participation in sport by age group, 2010
  45. 45. 42
  46. 46. 43 TABLE 16 - DOUBLES PARTICIPATION 2009-2014 Event 2009-2010 2010 - 2011 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013 - 2014 Ontario Mixed Doubles Granite Club Mayfair Parkway Var. Mayfair Parkway Var. Mayfair Lakeshore Var. Cedar Springs Var. Male 32 Male 35 3 Male 32 -3 Male 23 -9 Male 24 1 Female 32 Female 35 3 Female 32 -3 Female 23 -9 Female 24 1 Total 64 Total 70 6 Total 64 -6 Total 46 -18 Total 48 2 Veterans Doubles TRC TRC Var. TRC Var. TRC Var. TRC / Mayfair Lakeshore Var. Male 108 Male 96 -12 Male 76 -20 Male 80 4 Male 72 -8 Female 38 Female 34 -4 Female 22 -12 Female 38 16 Female 30 -8 Total 146 Total 130 -16 Total 98 -32 Total 118 20 Total 102 -16 Males B, C and Females B Doubles Pickering Recreation Pickering Recreation Var. n/a n/a n/a Male 42 Male 40 -2 Female 12 Female 14 2 Total 54 Total 54 0 Open Doubles Granite Club Granite Club Var. n/a n/a n/a Male 24 Male 22 -2 Female 14 Female 12 -2 Total 38 Total 34 -4 Ontario Doubles Championships n/a n/a Toronto Cricket Toronto Cricket Var. Mayfair Parkway Var. Male 110 Male 110 0 Male 64 -46 Female 32 Female 38 6 Female 36 -2 Total 142 Total 148 6 Total 100 -48 TOTAL PARTICIPATION Male 206 Male 193 -13 Male 218 25 Male 213 -5 Male 160 -53 Female 96 Female 95 -1 Female 86 -9 Female 99 13 Female 90 -9 Total 302 Total 288 -14 Total 304 16 Total 312 8 Total 250 -62
  47. 47. 44 TABLE 17 - ADULT SINGLES AND MASTERS PARTICIPATION 2009-2014 Event 2009-2010 2010 - 2011 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013-2014 Ontario Singles Closed Cedar Springs Mayfair Lakeshore Var. Mayfair Lakeshore Var. Mayfair Lakeshore Var. Mayfair Lakeshore Var. Male 65 Male 133 68 Male 139 6 Male 124 -15 Male 117 -7 Female 39 Female 54 15 Female 56 2 Female 39 -17 Female 28 -11 Total 104 Total 187 83 Total 195 8 Total 163 -32 Total 145 -18 Ontario Singles Open Club at White Oaks Club at White Oaks Var. Club at White Oaks Var. NSA Var. NSA Var. Male 18 Male 16 -2 Male 14 -2 Male 28 14 Male 25 -3 Female 8 Female 5 -3 Female 9 4 Female 13 4 Female 8 -5 Total 26 Total 21 -5 Total 23 2 Total 41 18 Total 33 -8 Ontario Masters Closed Executive Squash Executive Squash Var. Executive Squash Var. Mayfair Parkway Var. Mayfair Parkway Var. Male 100 Male 106 6 Male 74 -32 Male 86 12 Male 86 0 Female 41 Female 38 -3 Female 35 -3 Female 46 11 Female 46 0 Total 141 Total 144 3 Total 109 -35 Total 132 23 Total 132 0 Ontario Masters Open Glenway Country Club Glenway Country Club Var. Club at White Oaks Var. n/a n/a Male 74 Male 86 12 Male 58 -28 Female 30 Female 26 -4 Female 4 -22 Total 104 Total 112 8 Total 62 -50 Ontario Masters Teams n/a n/a Club at White Oaks Club at White Oaks Var. Club at White Oaks Var. Male 19 Male 66 47 Male 54 -12 Female 19 Female 56 37 Female 45 -11 Total 38 Total 122 84 Total 99 -23 Total Male 257 Male 341 84 Male 304 -37 Male 304 0 Male 282 -22 Female 69 Female 80 11 Female 79 -1 Female 95 16 Female 73 -22 Total 326 421 95 383 -38 399 16 -44
  48. 48. 45 TABLE 18 - JUNIORS PARTICIPATION 2009-2014 Event 2009-2010 2010 - 2011 2011 - 2012 2012 - 2013 2013-2014 Ontario Junior Closed Fabulous Fitness Fabulous Fitness Var. Executive Squash Var. Executive Squash Var. Executive Squash Var. Boys 85 Boys 99 14 Boys 85 -14 Boys 97 12 Boys 95 -2 Girls 43 Girls 42 -1 Girls 48 6 Girls 47 -1 Girls 52 5 Total 128 Total 141 13 Total 133 -8 Total 144 11 Total 147 3 Ontario Junior Open Club at White Oaks Club at White Oaks Var. Club at White Oaks Var. Club at White Oaks Var. Club at White Oaks Var. Boys 99 Boys 107 8 Boys 104 -3 Boys 108 4 Boys 108 0 Girls 57 Girls 48 -9 Girls 52 4 Girls 63 11 Girls 55 -8 Total 156 Total 155 -1 Total 156 1 Total 171 15 Total 163 -8 Super Silver (Ontario Silver Championships 2013) Fabulous Fitness Fabulous Fitness Var. Fabulous Fitness Var. Pickering Recreation Var. Executive Squash Var. Boys 92 Boys 91 -1 Boys 107 16 Boys 69 -38 Boys 64 -5 Girls 30 Girls 33 3 Girls 25 -8 Girls 9 -16 Girls 20 11 Total 122 Total 124 2 Total 132 8 Total 78 -54 Total 84 6 Junior Gold #1 Club at White Oaks TCS&CC Var. Club at White Oaks Var. Mayfair Parkway Var. NSA Var. Boys 78 Boys 95 17 Boys 76 -19 Boys 99 23 Boys 92 -7 Girls 37 Girls 37 Girls 42 5 Girls 46 4 Girls 41 -5 Total 115 Total 132 17 Total 118 -14 Total 145 27 Total 133 -12 Junior Gold #2 Glenway Country Club Glenway Country Club Var. Mayfair Parkway Var. Club at White Oaks Var. Ottawa Athletic Club Var. Boys 91 Boys 79 -12 Boys 85 6 Boys 93 8 Boys 43 -50 Girls 38 Girls 44 6 Girls 34 -10 Girls 46 12 Girls 12 -34 Total 129 Total 123 -6 Total 119 -4 Total 139 20 Total 55 -84 Junior Gold #3 GoodLife Queensview NSA Var. NSA Var. NSA Var. Club at White Oaks Var. Boys 56 Boys 79 23 Boys 85 6 Boys 80 -5 Boys 96 16 Girls 34 Girls 42 8 Girls 34 -8 Girls 39 5 Girls 40 1 Total 90 Total 121 31 Total 119 -2 Total 119 0 Total 136 17 Junior Gold #4 ORC ORC Var. ORC Var. ORC Var. Mayfair Parkway Var. Boys 80 Boys 71 -9 Boys 61 -10 Boys 74 13 Boys 85 11 Girls 38 Girls 44 6 Girls 39 -5 Girls 35 -4 Girls 34 -1 Total 118 Total 115 -3 Total 100 -15 Total 109 9 Total 119 10 Junior Gold #5 n/a n/a n/a n/a ORC Boys 68 Girls 30 Total 98 Junior Silver #1 Toronto Cricket GoodLife Parkview Var. Parkview Racquet Var. NSA Var. Mayfair Parkway Var. Boys 105 Boys 101 -4 Boys 70 -31 Boys 97 27 Boys 84 -13 Girls 44 Girls 26 -18 Girls 20 -6 Girls 24 4 Girls 21 -3 Total 149 Total 127 -19 Total 90 -37 Total 121 31 Total 105 -16 Junior Silver #2 London Squash Racquets The Club at White Oaks Var. TLTC / B&R Var. TLTC / B&R Var. TLTC / B&R Var. Boys 50 Boys 57 7 Boys 59 2 Boys 112 53 Boys 123 11 Girls 19 Girls 36 17 Girls 23 -13 Girls 26 3 Girls 43 17 Total 69 Total 93 24 Total 82 -11 Total 138 56 Total 166 28 Junior Silver #3 B&R/TLTC B&R/TLTC Var. London Squash Club Var. LSRC Var. Toronto Cricket Var. Boys 110 Boys 106 -4 Boys 55 -51 Boys 27 -28 Boys 78 51 Girls 35 Girls 31 -4 Girls 21 -10 Girls 5 -16 Girls 25 20 Total 145 Total 137 -8 Total 76 -61 Total 32 -44 Total 103 71 Junior Silver #4 Club Markham LSFC Var. B&R/TLTC Var. Northfield Var. n/a Boys Boys 33 Boys 104 71 Boys 36 -68 Girls n/a Girls 10 Girls 22 12 Girls 10 -12 Total Total 43 Total 126 83 Total 46 -80 Junior Silver #5 Cedar Springs (U11/U13) Northfield Var. Toronto Cricket Var. n/a n/a Boys 28 Boys 55 27 Boys 82 27 Girls 17 Girls 16 -1 Girls 30 14 Total 45 Total 71 26 Total 112 41
  49. 49. 46 Junior Silver #6 St Andrews (U15/U17) Burlington Racquet Club Var. St. Andrew's Var. n/a n/a Boys 59 Boys 46 -13 Boys 89 43 Girls 7 Girls 26 19 Girls 12 -14 Total 66 Total 72 6 Total 101 29 Junior Silver #7 GoodLife Parkview St. Andrew's Var. Northfield Racquet Var. n/a n/aBoys 79 Boys 41 -38 Boys 50 9 Girls 20 Girls 8 -12 Girls 12 4 Total 99 Total 49 -50 Total 62 13 Silver Circuit #1 / Grand Prix #1 n/a n/a n/a GoodLife Parkview Executive Squash Var. Boys 46 Boys 19 -27 Girls 18 Girls 12 -6 Total 64 Total 31 -33 Silver Circuit #2 / Grand Prix #1 n/a n/a n/a Cedar Springs Club at White Oaks Var. Boys 40 Boys 24 -16 Girls 7 Girls 5 -2 Total 47 Total 29 -18 Silver Circuit #2 / Grand Prix #2 n/a n/a n/a Ottawa Athletic (CANCELLED) Barrie Athletic Var. Boys 9 Boys 19 10 Girls 1 Girls 4 3 Total 10 Total 23 13 Silver Circuit #3 / Grand Prix #2 n/a n/a n/a TCSCC LSFC Var. Boys 32 Boys 30 -2 Girls 14 Girls 13 -1 Total 46 Total 43 -3 Silver Circuit #4 / Grand Prix #3 n/a n/a n/a ORC ORC Var. Boys 45 Boys 39 -6 Girls 6 Girls 4 -2 Total 51 Total 43 -8 Silver Circuit #5 / Grand Prix #5 n/a n/a n/a NSA Club Meadowvale Var. Boys 46 Boys 47 1 Girls 20 Girls 5 -15 Total 66 Total 52 -14 Silver Circuit #5 / Grand Prix #6 n/a n/a n/a Ottawa Athletic (CANCELLED) NSA Var. Boys 5 Boys 40 35 Girls 0 Girls 15 15 Total 5 Total 55 50 Silver Circuit #6 n/a n/a n/a Burlington Racquet n/a Boys 25 Girls 0 Total 25 Total Participation Boys 1012 Boys 1060 48 Boys 1112 52 Boys 1140 28 Boys 1154 14 Girls 419 Girls 443 24 Girls 414 -29 Girls 416 2 Girls 431 15 Total 1431 Total 1503 72 Total 1526 23 Total 1556 30 Total 1585 29
  50. 50. Squash Ontario Telephone: (416) 426-7201 Website: www.squashontario.com Facebook: facebook.com/squashontario Twitter: @squashontario Our values are part of everything we do.... Excellence.....in effort and performance Fairness.........in policies and decision-making Integrity........in our standards and conduct Respect..........in how we treat each other Get Fit...Play Squash!!

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