Social@ScaleWHAT 30 OF THE BEST MINDS IN SOCIAL THINK LARGE BRANDSMUST DO TO SUCCEED IN BEING SOCIAL AT SCALE.            ...
Dedicated to those who share ourmission to help every large enterprisebe Social.
Table of ContentsWhat is Social@Scale?.......................................................................................
Table of Contents cont’d.SECTION 2: Are you READY to be Social@Scale? Organization, Tools & Tactics       RENEE BLODGET......
Table of Contents cont’d.SECTION 4: Content & Conversation to be Social@Scale               VENKATESH RAO ...................
What is Social@Scale?Combining cutting-edge technology,corporate governance, and a disciplinedoperational framework, Socia...
How to Plan and Deliver a    Global Social Media Deployment    1       Map the Strategy            2   3    4    5        ...
The 6 “Must Haves” ForAny Enterprise Social RFP  1       Multi-Channel                                    Cross-Functional...
SECTION 1It’s Time to StartThinking Social@Scale
David Meerman Scott is a marketing strategist, advisor to emerging companies, keynote speaker, and an                     ...
The Real-Time Mindset: cont’d.Large Organizations Need to Work at ItThe more people you have in an organization, the tough...
David Armano is Editor-in-Chief of EdelmanDigital.com and Edelman’s Executive Vice President -- Global                    ...
Social Business: Not If, But When cont’d.The big question now is not IF social can scale, but when and how.               ...
Mitch Joel is President of Twist Image and the author of the best-selling business book, “Six Pixels of Separation.”      ...
Based in Alabama, Mack Collier is a social media strategist, trainer and speaker who specializes in helping               ...
Joseph Jaffe is Founder & Partner of Evol8tion, LLC, an innovation agency that matches early stage startups with          ...
Michael Brito is a Senior Vice President of Social Business Planning at Edelman Digital. He provides strategic            ...
Rohit Bhargava Bhargava is Senior Vice President of Global Strategy at Ogilvy and the best selling author of the          ...
Nilofer Merchant inspires fearless cultures. When fear rules, ideas are stifled, innovation stagnates. Remove              ...
Ted Coine is one of the most influential business leaders online and is recognized on the Forbes list of Top 50            ...
A frequent commentator on NPR, David Weinberger is a senior researcher at Harvard Law’s Berkman Center                    ...
The Internet is Not the Medium: WE are the Medium cont’d.So what should businesses do?1. Don’t talk unless what you say wi...
Shelly Palmer is the host of Fox Television’s Shelly Palmer Digital Living, the author of “Overcoming The                 ...
Mark Earls is one of the marketing world’s leading experts on human behavior and behavior change. Mark                    ...
People Are Not Robots; Corporations Are Not Machines Either cont’d.But corporations aren’t machines and thinking about the...
SECTION 2Are you READY tobe Social@Scale?ORGANIZATION, TOOLS & TACTICS
Renee Blodgett is the founder of Magic Sauce Media, a new media services consultancy focused on viral                     ...
Augie Ray was most recently the Executive Director of Community and Collaboration at USAA, where he and                   ...
Your Job is NOT to Raise Your Own Klout Score: cont’d.It’s also important to select tools that can be deployed and support...
Nicknamed “The King of Social” by Samsung at South by SouthWest, Brett Petersel is constantly connecting                  ...
Ted Rubin is the most followed CMO on Twitter. In March 2009, he started using and evangelizing the term                  ...
Return on Relationship: cont’d.We’ve seen a little of this in the way some companies havetapped employees to enhance custo...
SECTION 3Social@ScaleOrganizational Models
Sarah Evans is the Chief Evangelist at Tracky, an open social collaboration platform. She shares her social               ...
How to Scale the Social Media Corporate Team at the Enterprise Level cont’d.3. Community Manager -- The online voice and p...
Jeff Bullas is a digital marketing strategist and one of Forbes’ “Top 50 Social Media Power Influencers.” He is            ...
Why Social@Scale Shouldn’t Be Left to the Interns cont’d.It is becoming a deluge of data on many social networks.So far, o...
Chris Brogan is president of Human Business Works, a publishing and media company devoted to promoting the                ...
Six Areas Where to Focus Your Social@Scale Energy cont’d.3. Client Relations – I separate client relations from customer s...
Jason Falls is an author, speaker and CEO of Social Media Explorer, a digital marketing agency and information            ...
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team
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Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team

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Let’s say you are working at one of the world’s 5000 largest businesses.

You know you need to “be social.”

You are faced with the key question of:

How do we scale social across our entire enterprise in a manageable, measurable, and effective way?

Meet The Social Media Dream Team.

Packaged up in one FREE PDF for you to download, Sprinklr has engaged the Enterprise Social Media Dream Team to help.

Who's on it?
Chris Brogan, Jason Falls, Joseph Jaffe, David Meerman Scott, David Armano, Rohit Bhargava, Mitch Joel, Peter Shankman, Mack Collier, Michael Brito, Jay Baer, Edward Boches, Ann Handley, Nilofer Merchant, Ted Coine, David Weinberger, Shelly Palmer, Mark Earls, Renee Blodget, Augie Ray, Brett Petersel, Ted Rubin, Sarah Evans, Jeff Bullas, Jay Baer, Amy Vernon, Matt Dickman, Thomas Baekdal, Venkatesh Rao, Richard Stacy, , Hugh MacLeod and Doc Searls.

And what will you learn in this eBook?
The Dream Team covers topics such as:
-Branding in a Social@Scale World
-Content & Conversation to be Social@Scale
-Social@Scale Organizational Models
-Tools and Tactics to be Social@Scale
-How to Think Social@Scale

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Best Practices for Enterprise Social Media Management by the Social Media Dream Team

  1. 1. Social@ScaleWHAT 30 OF THE BEST MINDS IN SOCIAL THINK LARGE BRANDSMUST DO TO SUCCEED IN BEING SOCIAL AT SCALE. HOW TO PLAN AND DELIVER A GLOBAL SOCIAL MEDIA DEPLOYMENT, PG 2 HOW PREPARED ARE YOU TO BE SOCIAL@SCALE? FIND OUT NOW. TAKE THE READINESS ASSESSMENT, PG 58
  2. 2. Dedicated to those who share ourmission to help every large enterprisebe Social.
  3. 3. Table of ContentsWhat is Social@Scale?...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1How to Plan and Deliver a Global Social Media Deployment ................................................................................. 2The 6 “Must Haves” For Any Enterprise Social RFP ......................................................................................................... 3SECTION 1: It’s Time to Start Thinking Social@Scale DAVID MEERMAN SCOTT ........................................................................................................................................................................ 6 The Real-Time Mindset: Don’t Use the Word “Social” DAVID ARMANO .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 7 Social Business@Scale: Not If, But When MITCH JOEL .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 9 Does Social Really Scale? MACK COLLIER ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Commitment to Change: Not Every Enterprise is Ready for Social@Scale JOSEPH JAFFE ..............................................................................................................................................................................................11 Social@Scale and Other Oxymorons MICHAEL BRITO .........................................................................................................................................................................................12 A Britopian View: Success Cannot Be Measured By Fans Alone ROHIT BHARGAVA .....................................................................................................................................................................................13 3 Tips For Scaling Likeability (And Why It Matters) NILOFER MERCHANT .............................................................................................................................................................................. 14 From 800 Lb Gorillas to 800 Gazelles TED COINE .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 15 The Social and The Extinct DAVID WEINBERGER ................................................................................................................................................................................ 16 The Internet is Not the Medium: WE are the Medium SHELLY PALMER ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 18 No Crystal Ball Required: The Future of Social Media is Now MARK EARLS ...........................................................................................................................................................................19 People Are Not Robots; Corporations Are Not Machines Either
  4. 4. Table of Contents cont’d.SECTION 2: Are you READY to be Social@Scale? Organization, Tools & Tactics RENEE BLODGET....................................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Achieving Social@Scale Means Getting Rid of Your Silos AUGIE RAY ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 23 Your Job is NOT to Raise Your Own Klout Score: Thinking Beyond Posts, Tweets, Games and Pins BRETT PETERSEL ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Time to Get Rid of Your Social Media Silos TED RUBIN .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 26 Return on Relationship: Why Companies Need to Embrace Social@ScaleSECTION 3: Social@Scale Organizational Models SARAH EVANS ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 29 How to Scale the Social Media Corporate Team at the Enterprise Level JEFF BULLAS............................................................................................................................................................................................... 31 Why Social@Scale Shouldn’t Be Left to the Interns CHRIS BROGAN ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 33 Six Areas Where to Focus Your Social@Scale Energy JASON FALLS ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 35 Social Media Software is Only Part of the Equation JAY BAER ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 37 The 5 Critical Social Media Skills You Need to Disperse MATT DICKMAN ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 39 Social@Scale Begins With an Informed C-Suite
  5. 5. Table of Contents cont’d.SECTION 4: Content & Conversation to be Social@Scale VENKATESH RAO ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 42 Avoid Fake Relationships: Using Irony and Humor to Engage Contradictory Marketing Realities EDWARD BOCHES ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 44 7 Tips For Being Social And Doing It at Scale ANN HANDLEY .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 46 An Open Letter to C-Level Executives: How do we SCALE social? DOC SEARLS ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 48 The Personal Side of Social@Scale RICHARD STACY ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 50 The Value of Small Group Conversations: Why a ‘Platform for the Masses’ is Not the Same Thing as a ‘Mass Platform.’ AMY VERNON ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 52 You Have to CareSECTION 5: Branding in a Social@Scale World PETER SHANKMAN ................................................................................................................................................................................. 54 The Great Airport Steak-Out: How Morton’s Gets Its Customers to Scale Social for Them THOMAS BAEKDAL .................................................................................................................................................................................. 56 Is Your Brand Socially Compatible?Social@Scale Readiness Assessment .............................................................................................................................................. 58
  6. 6. What is Social@Scale?Combining cutting-edge technology,corporate governance, and a disciplinedoperational framework, Social@Scaleenables brands to engage in a timelyand relevant manner with their globalaudience from a single platformacross multiple corporate functionsin multiple social channels.
  7. 7. How to Plan and Deliver a Global Social Media Deployment 1 Map the Strategy 2 3 4 5 Define the business objectives and the specific set of social activities designed to meet those objectives.1 2 Staff Up: Suggested Roles 3 4 5 GLOBAL: 1 2 1 social media executive 2 an implementation team REGIONAL: 1 2 1 social media director 2 an analyst LOCAL: 1 2 3 4 5 1 a community manager 4 a content manager 2 a social media manager 5 subject matter experts 3 a reporting manager from marketing, HR, customer service &PR 1 2 3 4 5 Measure2 3 4 5 1 2 Plan to Operate 3 4 5 Consistently Brand Social 1. Campaign Effectiveness 1. Activity plan by role 1. Online social brand 2. Audience Engagement 2. Rules of conduct style guide for look 3. Reach 3. Activations 2. Detailed guidelines for brand feel 4. Sunsetting & Business Deactivations 1. Response Times 5. Best practices 2. Voice of the Customer 3. NPS 4. Attributable eCommerce Revenue SOCIAL@SCALE | 2
  8. 8. The 6 “Must Haves” ForAny Enterprise Social RFP 1 Multi-Channel Cross-Functional 2 Management Capabilities Manage conversations across Collaboration among multiple ALL social channels functional units Support for new & international networks Automated & customizable rules, filters, and actions Native design for multiple channels Workflow, routing, queues, notifications, and escalations 3 Scalability Social Governance 4 Natural Language Processing Global user access, to manage large message volume permission, approvers, and Architecture to support volume spikes RFP password management Audit trails, digital asset management, Multi-country and multi-language calendaring, templates Legal deployments 5 Customized Reporting Rapid Product 6 Enhancements Measure engagement, Frequency of new product feature releases response times, dispersion Ability to support custom development Connect social activity to business results Integration with existing VERSIO 2.0 analytics tools N Message categorization at a granular level SOCIAL@SCALE | 3
  9. 9. SECTION 1It’s Time to StartThinking Social@Scale
  10. 10. David Meerman Scott is a marketing strategist, advisor to emerging companies, keynote speaker, and an international bestselling author of eight books including “Real-Time Marketing & PR” and “Newsjacking.” His books have been translated into 30 languages. You can follow David on Twitter @dmscott or at his personal blog, Web Ink Now.The Real-Time Mindset:Don’t Use the Word “Social”BY DAVID MEERMAN SCOTTWhen I speak with executives around the world about social,many think of their kids’ Facebook or Twitter and what you hadfor lunch, deciding that social is frivolous at best and a dangeroustime-waster at worst. “Recognize yourIn order to scale social, I recommend not using the word employees as“social” at all and instead substitute “real-time”An immensely powerful competitive advantage flows to responsible adults. Empower them toorganizations with people who understand the power of real-time information. What are people doing on your site right now?Has someone just praised you on Facebook? Panned you onTwitter? Published a how-to video about your product onYouTube? Executives understand real-time and are eager to take initiative.”implement the ideas.Conventional vs. Real-TimeThe conventional business approach favors a campaign (note the war metaphor) that requires people to spend weeks or monthsplanning to hit targets. Agencies must be consulted. Messaging strategies must be developed. Advertising space/time must bebought. Conference rooms and refreshments must be prepared for press conferences. Do you serve them sushi or sandwiches?The real-time mindset recognizes the importance of speed. It is an attitude to business (and to life) that emphasizes movingquickly when the time is right.Developing a real-time mindset is not an either/or proposition. I’m not saying you should abandon your current business-planning process. Nor do I advocate allowing your team to run off barking at every car that drives by. Focus and collaborationare essential.cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 5
  11. 11. The Real-Time Mindset: cont’d.Large Organizations Need to Work at ItThe more people you have in an organization, the tougher it is to communicate in real time. In a command-and-controlenvironment where no action can be taken without authority, without consultation, without due process, any individualwho shows initiative can expect to be squashed.The challenge is to develop a new balance that empowers employee initiative but offers real-time guidance when it’sneeded—like a hotline to higher authority.In a real-time corporate culture, everyone is recognized as a responsible adult.If you’re the leader, and you want to cultivate a real-time mindset throughout your organization, tear down thecommand-and-control mentality. Recognize your employees as responsible adults. Empower them to take initiative. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 6
  12. 12. David Armano is Editor-in-Chief of EdelmanDigital.com and Edelman’s Executive Vice President -- Global Innovation & Integration. David previously was a founder of the social business consultancy Dachis Group, helping launch the business from stealth mode into the marketplace. He regularly writes industry perspectives for the Harvard Business Review, and co-founded the “Allhat” event -- billed by SXSW as populated by “the most respected voices in digital.” You can follow David on Twitter @armano or at his Logic + Emotion blog.Social Business: Not If, But WhenBY DAVID ARMANODo you remember webmasters? This was a real title at one point in the corporate world created many years ago to supportsomething we called the “website,” a digital manifestation of your company. The problem with webmasters was that as general-ists who could wear multiple hats -- coding, writing, designing and managing one or more sites -- they as single individuals couldnot scale.Today, we are rapidly moving toward an era of Social Business@Scale, which loosely translates to an organization’s ability tointegrate social technology and behavior internally and externally. Why? Because much like “digital” before it, “social” promisesto empower both consumers and employees alike leading to positive business outcomes for the organizations which figure outhow to crack the social code.cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 7
  13. 13. Social Business: Not If, But When cont’d.The big question now is not IF social can scale, but when and how. “... much likeTo answer that, let’s look back at yesterday’s webmasters whowere replaced by teams, systems and new processes -- alldesigned for scale. We can also look back at the leaders ofyesterday: the CIOs and CMOs who made digital a priorityand led efforts in e-commerce or ambitious corporate global ‘digital’ before it, ‘ social’ promises towebsite rollouts. Lastly, let’s recall those who embraced a digitalculture, individuals who spent countless hours “surfing” theinformation highway and living a digital lifestyle. empower bothHow will social business scale?It will have something to do with “the three P’s” of change consumers andmanagement. Changes in People (culture, job descriptions),Process (systems and workflow), and Platforms (technology) employees alike...”will need to take place in order for social to be woven into thefabric of an organization.Much like yesterday’s webmasters, today’s communitymanagers represent the first wave of social, a newly createdposition designed to deal with a social web. But communitymanagers alone can’t scale and a social business can’t bebuilt overnight. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 8
  14. 14. Mitch Joel is President of Twist Image and the author of the best-selling business book, “Six Pixels of Separation.” His next book, “CTRL ALT DEL - Reboot Your Business (and Yourself ) in a Connected World,” will be published in Spring 2013. You can follow Mitch on Twitter @mitchjoel or at his Six Pixels of Separation blog.Does Social Really Scale?BY MITCH JOELThat’s the real question and that’s the question that organiza-tions are going to have to hunker down and start thinkingabout moving forward. “Social is the act of making all of theAt first, social media was all about making sure that you canrespond to customer and client needs in a timely (and public!)manner. Now that we live in a world where close to one billionpeople are connected on Facebook alone, things are going tochange. Enter the brave new Era of Social Business, where material that awe are all -- including everyone from the President down tothe receptionist -- moving from a hierarchical response-and- company producesmeasure infrastructure to a much more non-hierarchicalstructure. more shareable and findable.”We’re now all responsible for how we communicate – bothinternally and externally. We’re seeing companies like Oracleand Salesforce invest in and acquire (at an alarming rate) busi-nesses that are able to help their people be more social. Sadly,many people still think that social is about the conversation.It isn’t.Social is the act of making all of the material that a company produces more shareable and findable. When what you do – as abusiness – is more shareable and findable, people will do something very social with it. They’ll share it, comment on it, createcontent around it and engage with you and your business. If you can master that one little (but vastly important) nuance, youwill begin to see what happens when a company becomes social. Then you can make it scale with the right tools, philosophicalapproach, and more importantly… the right people. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 9
  15. 15. Based in Alabama, Mack Collier is a social media strategist, trainer and speaker who specializes in helping companies better connect with their customers via social media. He is also the founder and moderater of #Blogchat, the largest Twitter Chat on the internet, where thousands of people meet each Sunday night to discuss a different blogging topic. His first business book, “Think Like A Rockstar: How to Create Social Media and Marketing Strategies That Turn Customers Into Fans,” will be published in 2013. You can follow Mack on Twitter @MackCollier or at his personal blog.Commitment to Change: Not EveryEnterprise is Ready for Social@ScaleBY MACK COLLIERBefore a large organization can scale social across itself, it needs to make two commitments:1. It must create a continuous feedback loop between its customers and itself, where the organization and its customers have direct channels of communication. A “quick and dirty” method of accomplishing this is via robust social media presences, but it needs to go beyond that. There needs to be mechanisms in place both internally within the enterprise and externally among the customers that facilitate and encourage the flow of information in both directions.2. It must create an internal structure that can not only glean relevant customer and company insights, but also distrib- “There needs to be ute those insights to the appropriate areas of the company so it can act on that information. This is why there’s been so much talk in recent years of removing the “silos” within organizations, and more free-sharing of information. mechanisms in place both internally... andThe problem is that these two commitments will require anextensive financial commitment from the average enterprise,and many won’t follow through unless they can see a clearbenefit. The average large organization won’t commit tomaking these necessary changes until they better understand externally among thethe value realized from better connections with their custom-ers (and employees), especially via emerging social and mobile customers that facilitatetechnologies.When companies begin to move away from trying to directly and encourage the flow of information inextract sales from customers (via traditional marketing) tounderstanding that creating value for customers will indirectlylead to sales, then we’ll begin to see the necessary changestake place both internally and externally. both directions.”But these changes will come very slowly for many largeorganizations. Cultures that take decades to form don’ttypically turn around overnight. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 10
  16. 16. Joseph Jaffe is Founder & Partner of Evol8tion, LLC, an innovation agency that matches early stage startups with established brands to partner via mentoring, pilot programs, investment and/or acquisition. In 2009, he launched his first foray into video in the form of JaffeJuiceTV -- in an effort to prove once and for all that he does not have a face for radio. You can follow Joseph on Twitter @jaffejuice or at his “Jaffe Juice” blog and audio podcast.Social@Scale and Other OxymoronsBY JOSEPH JAFFE“Social Media” – it’s a contradiction at best and oxymoron at worst; or perhaps I should say transferred epithet, while I’m split-ting grammatical hairs. And the moron in question is anyone who is using it incorrectly. “Social” = You and I grabbing a beer after work. “Media” = The artificially created and contrived term created “the real role of by us to repetitively hit our “prospects” or targets over the head with a blunt object called advertising or paid media. social media “Social” + “Media” aka Oil + Water = “Social Media.”I like to refer social media as “non media.”Not paid media; not earned media; not owned media, but is retention.”non-media. It is the power of peer-to-peer; human-to-humanconnections. Influence. Advocacy. Referrals. Crediblecustomer-centric endorsements. Yes, even word-of-mouth.I believe that the real role of social media is retention.I also do believe that social can scale. It can get to scale with the same outcome as marketers so desperately covet and desire,BUT there’s an entirely different route that needs to be taken.Social@Scale comes via a combination of two approaches:1. Reaggregation -- I share this term with my colleague, Rishad Tobaccowala. It is a bottom-up approach that is diametrically opposed to the carpet-bombing, top-down incumbent method. From the few comes the many.2. Combining Technology and Humanity -- We’re very good at using technology to automate, streamline and simplify, but the real challenge is how to scale humanity -- that is, how to use technology to achieve scale without losing our souls in the process.Put the two together and we might just have a fighting chance of figuring out the sweet spot of new marketing, which representsa win-win for both our consumers (authentic, credible and transparent connections) and shareholders (economies of scale,critical mass and real business outcomes).Simple, right? SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 11
  17. 17. Michael Brito is a Senior Vice President of Social Business Planning at Edelman Digital. He provides strategic counsel, guidance, and best practices to several of Edelman’s top global tech accounts and is responsible for helping transform their organizations to be more open, collaborative and socially proficient -- with the end result of creating shared value with employees, partners and customers. You can follow Michael on Twitter @Britopian or at his Britopian blog.A Britopian View: Success CannotBe Measured By Fans AloneBY MICHAEL BRITOSocial media is not just about friends, fans and followers.There is certainly some validity to this thinking because ourminds have been trained to focus on outcomes. If doneright, implementing smart social media initiatives such as “Problems arise when we don’tcommunity engagement, advocacy/influencer management,a Facebook sponsored story or a Promoted Tweet will increasecommunity growth.Yes, that’s a good thing. But there is so much more to it. think about theProblems arise when we don’t think about the possibleimplications that this bright and shiny object called “social possible impli-media” can cause. Issues usually include: cations that this* Disjointed Content* How to Scale Programs Globally bright and shiny* Confusion of Roles & Responsibilities object called ‘socialThis is not hype and not a scare tactic. These are real issuesthat plague business today. media’ can cause.”Social business can be compared to building a house.Organizations must focus on the infrastructure first andoperationalize their content marketing and communitymanagement, build governance models and create workflowsthat address customer support integration.The last thing you want to do is hang dry wall AFTER it is painted, right? SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 12
  18. 18. Rohit Bhargava Bhargava is Senior Vice President of Global Strategy at Ogilvy and the best selling author of the new book, “Likeonomics,” which illustrates why we do business with people we like and how any brand can profit from being more likeable. You can follow Rohit on Twitter @rohitbhargava or at his Influential Marketing Blog3 Tips For Scaling Likeability(And Why It Matters)BY ROHIT BHARGAVABy now you’ve heard the predictions that social media is reinventing business, or products, or customers. In the midst of all this“reinvention,” however, is the not-so-trivial challenge of delivering a great product or service. We are often taught that if we getthe product or service right, everything else takes care of itself. The only problem is that it doesn’t really work that way. Satisfiedcustomers leave all the time because they have no real reason to stay. Satisfaction isn’t the same thing as loyalty.Social media can help by answering the most important customer questions, delighting them, and offering more than just asatisfactory experience. Organizations that use social media effectively understand this, but there are still some big challenges.Ownership is one. Who is really in charge of it? Who will answer that tweet on a Sunday afternoon? Just as important isscalability. How do you scale something as elusive as “likeability?”There are plenty of benefits of likeability for your brand, from increased customer loyalty to the ability to encourage moreproactive word of mouth and referrals. Customers stay loyal to brands that they have a deeper personal relationship with.Here are a few tips for scaling thislikeability for your brand:1. Encourage Humanity: People identify with brands that treat them like real people, so skip the terms and “People identify conditions and make it a priority for your people to engage with customers in more meaningful ways. with brands that2. Identify the Creators: In every organization you have treat them like people who are passionate about creating content of all sorts. Often they come from areas outside marketing. Conduct an real people” internal search to find this passion, and you can often scale your team from within.3. Simplify the Tools: Using platforms to manage social media offer great value, as long as you make sure they are simple enough that anyone in your organization can use them to contribute. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 13
  19. 19. Nilofer Merchant inspires fearless cultures. When fear rules, ideas are stifled, innovation stagnates. Remove that fear and you’ll see people thrive. Fearlessness brings results. Nilofer’s career began at Apple and she has since been a CEO, run Fortune 500 companies, led successful start-ups, and launched over 100 products that account for $18B in revenues. She’s also written O’Reilly’s most successful business book to date, “The New How: Creating Business Solutions Through Collaborative Strategy.” In her work, she helps organizations close the Air Sandwich, the proverbial gap between strategy and execution. You can follow Nilofer on Twitter @nilofer or at her “Yes And No: Sparks For Innovators” blog.From 800 Lb Gorillas to 800 GazellesBY NILOFER MERCHANT“Size matters.” This is just one of five legacies that traditional strategy taught us that no longer apply in the Social Era. And, it issimply wrong for leaders of organizations to continue to rely on this (and other) passé ideas.Yet, too many still do. It is the reason that the 800 lb gorillas ofour days -- including banking and finance, automotive, energy,agriculture, and IT – are dying or failing in tectonic ways. “The #SocialEra has new rules: scaleSocial allows us to do something entirely differently. But beforewe can, we have to disaggregate two words – social is notalways attached to the word media. Social can be a way tooperate all parts of the business model, from what we create,to how we deliver, and also how to reach markets. happens by beingIt’s not enough to do what we did yesterday incrementallybetter. Until we collectively stop thinking of Social as some way connected withto do x incrementally better, we’re never going to redesign theenterprise. To patch Social onto the existing enterprise means community.”a programmatic approach. But to use Social for a strategicredesign, well, you have to have the ability to meet the rapidlychanging demands of a volatile and global marketplace.Scale in the old era meant being big. That’s why we celebrated the 800-Lb Gorilla. But the #SocialEra has new rules – and clearlya new truth – scale happens by being connected with community. Social@Scale will look more like 800 Gazelles – nimblyforming into tribes and being fast/fluid/flexible to act and engage with the market. This will lead to more than “winning,” it willlead to thriving organizations. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 14
  20. 20. Ted Coine is one of the most influential business leaders online and is recognized on the Forbes list of Top 50 “Power Influencers” in Social Media. He is currently writing his third book, about how social media is changing business leadership as we know it. You can follow Ted on Twitter @tedcoine or at his Switch and Shift blog.The Social and The ExtinctBY TED COINEWhat is Social@Scale for the enterprise? That’s simple: Howmany employees do you have?That’s how large your social media staff can be. Simple, yes, but “If you don’t get social integrated throughoutnot necessarily easy. So here are a few tips to make sure you’reheaded in the right direction.1. Craft a social media policy that fits your culture. Is your cul- ture controlling or enabling? Your policy must fit your culture your enterprise and infused in your culture or you’re headed for trouble.2. Which department should “own” social? Marketing? PR? Customer Service? R&D? Recruiting? Executive Leadership? The savvy enterprise will answer “all of the above – ASAP no other advice , will matter.” and more!”3. Train, enable, and connect everyone. See what they come up with. Social is by definition a bottom-up endeavor.4. Meet your audience where it already is, and engage in conver- sation, not broadcasting. Think of it this way: SOCIAL (media).5. Whatever technology you use to manage across social platforms, make sure it’s nimble enough to add new ones as they gain popularity – even several times a year, as necessary.Finally, a word of warning because my main area of expertise is C-level leadership rather than media old or new: If you don’t getsocial integrated throughout your enterprise and infused in your culture ASAP, no other advice will matter. Social is changingeverything about how business is done. Everything. Leaders who ignore that do so at their own peril. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 15
  21. 21. A frequent commentator on NPR, David Weinberger is a senior researcher at Harvard Law’s Berkman Center for the Internet & Society and Co-Director of the Harvard Library Innovation Lab at Harvard Law School. He also is the author of “Too Big to Know,” and the co-author of “The Cluetrain Manifesto.” Under the radar, David also wrote seven years worth of gags for Woody Allen’s comic strip, but was never asked to make a cameo in any of his movies. You can follow David on Twitter @dweinberger or at his personal blog, Joho.The Internet is Not the Medium:WE are the MediumBY DAVID WEINBERGER“Social@Scale” until recently was a contradiction. We assumed the more social ties you had, the weaker they became -- untilyou were down to people whose names you can’t quite remember. But the Net is a swirl of sociality that can go from zero-to-intimate in nanoseconds. And each new relationship can be the start of something that builds, can fall away forever, or canbe there as a possibility for another unexpected fling. Sociality thus doesn’t work the way we assumed it did. New possibilitiesare emerging.And this is for three key reasons. First, the Net connects us all — “When businesseswell, a couple of billion of us.Second, it enables a flourishing of innovative ways of beingsocial. (How often in our history could we have said that? Wait,I know! This once!) try to push theirThird, the Internet is not a medium. A telegraph wire is amedium for dots and dashes: messages are sent through it. The own messagesNet’s not like that. Messages pass through the Internet becausewe -- the people on the Internet -- find them interesting enough through the Net, it is worse thanto send along. Telegraph wires don’t get to send only the dotsand dashes they happen to care about. And telegraph wiresdon’t see their social standing go up or down based upon themessages they pass. The Internet is not a medium. We arethe medium. ineffective - it isBecause of this, when businesses try to push their own messagesthrough the Net, it is worse than ineffective. It is offensive. The offensive.”Net manages to provide scale based on intimacy. It does thisby enabling connections that express what matters to us.Messaging of the marketing sort corrodes intimacy.cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 16
  22. 22. The Internet is Not the Medium: WE are the Medium cont’d.So what should businesses do?1. Don’t talk unless what you say will improve the conversation.2. Since hierarchies don’t interact well with networks, the people who speak for you on the Net need also to be speaking for themselves as honest-to-God humans with names and faces -- people who put the value of the conversation and the interests of your customers ahead of the narrow interests of your business.We’re building something wonderful here. Corrupt it at your peril. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 17
  23. 23. Shelly Palmer is the host of Fox Television’s Shelly Palmer Digital Living, the author of “Overcoming The Digital Divide: How to Use Social Media and Digital Tools to Reinvent Yourself and Your Career” (York House Press 2011) and the founder of Shelly Palmer Digital Leadership, an industry-leading advisory and business development firm. You can follow Shelly on Twitter @shellypalmer or at his Digital Leadership blog.No Crystal Ball Required:The Future of Social Media is NowBY SHELLY PALMERAccording to Cisco, by 2015 there will be more than 15 billionconnected devices in the world. Even if this number is an overes-timation, it is virtually certain that tomorrow there will be manymore connected devices than there are today. Intel projects that “The capability to interpret and actthis trend will continue until over 4 billion people have access tothe Internet somewhere around 2020.No crystal ball is needed to see the future of social media.Metcalfe’s Law tells us that with each connection, the value of upon millions of messages in realour network increases. This is an immutable fact of the future,but it is also a challenge. As the network grows, so will its powerto amplify the speed and scale of any message -- good or bad.It is incumbent upon today’s digital leaders to make every effort time is not a thing of the future, it isto prepare for the exponential growth of social media. Thecapability to interpret and act upon millions of messages in realtime is not a thing of the future, it is a necessity of the present.In my professional experience, I have found that businesspeople a necessity of the present.”are generally extremely smart, but bureaucracies are generallyextremely stupid. The challenge is to integrate a scalable,interactive, real-time social media processing mechanism intoa large number of bureaucratically-built legacy systems, and thensocialize its use company-wide. This may take a while. The goodnews is that the tools exist. All you have to do is choose a bestpractices suite of solutions. What’s the bad news? There is none,I’m optimistic about the future and the evolution of Social@Scale. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 18
  24. 24. Mark Earls is one of the marketing world’s leading experts on human behavior and behavior change. Mark is the author of “Welcome to the Creative Age: Bananas, Business and the Death of Marketing,” “HERD: How to Change Mass Behavior by Harnessing Our True Nature,” and “I’ll Have What She’s Having.” In the last few years, he has advised a wide range of organizations around the world including: Sony Corporation, Greenpeace, Unilever, The School of Life, Channel 4 TV, and the UK’s Royal Mail. You can follow Mark on Twitter @herdmeister or at his personal blog.People Are Not Robots;Corporations Are Not Machines EitherBY MARK EARLSThe single biggest challenge for any business leader pondering “One of thethe pros and cons of this social revolution is human-shaped.Let’s be honest, the technology itself is banal and easy to learnto use, to track and to interpret – it is in different forms alreadypart of our personal lives. And there are – as you’d expect – reasons that these social techno-lots of folks willing to take your money in order to explain howto use the technology to the nth degree (not all of these aresnake-oil salesmen, mind you).No, the biggest challenge for all of us lies in the humans who logies are being souse the technology and the (largely false) assumptions we holdabout those people. readily adopted by our consumers andPeople are not like machines. They are not individual independ-ent utility-calculating robots – they are much smarter thanthat. Humans are fundamentally social creatures who live theirlives in the company of others, more often than not makingchoices based on what those around them do and say. They customers is thatoutsource cognitive load, using the brains of those aroundthem to store, recall and decide. they feel natural.”One of the reasons that these social technologies are being soreadily adopted by our consumers and customers is that theyfeel natural. They serve to amplify a central part of our humanity: our super social nature. Mass adoption of social tools meansthat while it may seem simple to think about “the consumer,” it is very rarely “the” anymore.A similar misunderstanding of the people thing is visible inside most organizations – we imagine corporations are like machinesthat are improvable and perfectible. That’s why management consultants so like the idea of “[re-]engineering” businesses.cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 19
  25. 25. People Are Not Robots; Corporations Are Not Machines Either cont’d.But corporations aren’t machines and thinking about them as “Organizationalif they were misses the point, too. Corporations are built onpeople like those who live outside and buy its products andservices. It is the degree to which you manage to get them todo so successfully which is the source of much contemporarycompetitive advantage. This is one of the main reasons why the ‘purpose’ has gainednotion of organizational “purpose” has gained traction at thesame time as the social revolution has blossomed. Purpose traction at the same time as the socialgives people something to engage with and something torally around. revolution hasWhether you’re thinking about inside or outside theorganization, the social aspect of our humanity is fundamentalto any organization’s success. It makes things messier, moreunpredictable and more prone to cascades of irrationality andenthusiasm than we’ve been used to. And as too many blossomed.”corporate horror stories attest, it makes businesses muchmore vulnerable to sustained criticism. Or to be more precise,it reveals how things have long been while we were hidingbehind our “engineering” metaphors.No, the biggest problem doesn’t lie with them (customers,employees etc) but with us and our ideas and our default settings. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 20
  26. 26. SECTION 2Are you READY tobe Social@Scale?ORGANIZATION, TOOLS & TACTICS
  27. 27. Renee Blodgett is the founder of Magic Sauce Media, a new media services consultancy focused on viral marketing, social media, branding, events and PR. For over 20 years, she has helped companies from 12 countries get traction in the market. Renee is also the founder of We Blog the World, an online culture and travel magazine, and regularly blogs at “Down the Avenue.” She was ranked the #12 Social Media Influencer on a top 50 list by Forbes earlier this year. You can follow Renee on Twitter @MagicSauceMedia or at her Down The Avenue blog.Achieving Social@Scale MeansGetting Rid of Your SilosBY RENEE BLODGETDeveloping personal relationships with customers isn’t new and smart marketing-centric companies have been investing incustomer relationships for years. Dell, McDonald’s and American Airlines did it in the early days. Zappos now makes personalcustomer relationships their raison d’etre and after a series of “fails,” Comcast is attempting to show the customer matterswith “Comcast Cares.” “DevelopingIt’s never been easier to reach out and develop relationshipswith customers in an always-on world where you can respondto their needs, demands and praise instantaneously. Whatmakes it complex and expensive for corporations to takecustomer relationships to a deeper level is the fact that con- personal relationships withversation threads are fragmented and exist in silos on multiplesocial media channels, making it not only difficult to monitorand manage, but tough to keep a consistent voice that matchesthe brand. customers isn’t new.”There’s an added layer of complexity when the brand isperceived differently in different countries around the worldand an added layer of fear ensuring they abide by propergovernance protocols.Getting rid of the silos so more efficient communication can happen on a regular basis is the key to success. Multi-divisionenterprises need to focus on one single platform where you can manage the brand’s voice across all of these channels andsmartly curate customized content. This will ensure that not only their customer’s concerns are heard, but responded to ina way that will foster relationships contributing to their bottom line. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 22
  28. 28. Augie Ray was most recently the Executive Director of Community and Collaboration at USAA, where he and his team managed social media programs for marketing and customer care, deployed communities, educated employees and executives on social media trends and created the enterprise social business vision. Augie was previously at Forrester, where he consulted on social media marketing, community and social media management platforms as well as the organizational structure for social. You can follow Augie on Twitter @augieray or at his Experience: The Blog.Your Job is NOT to Raise Your OwnKlout Score: Thinking Beyond Posts,Tweets, Games and PinsBY AUGIE RAYLots of folks seem to feel that the words “control” and “social”don’t belong together in the same sentence. That’s ridiculous-- large companies cannot simply unleash thousands of employ-ees to launch whatever accounts they wish and maintain them “It can be a costly mistake to allowin any manner that feels right, all without rules, tools, guidanceand monitoring. The stakes are far too high: Large brands canneither afford to be the next poster child for social PR blunders,nor can they allow a competitive advantage to slip away overfears of social missteps. different parts ofIt is too easy for a social media professional to get caught upin all the ideas and possibilities of social, but the first step isn’t the companyto think of tweets, posts, games and pins. Instead, Social@Scalebegins with more mundane but vital things: to secure their Does your industry face any special regulations? own listening Do your employees understand their limits and what actions can get them and the company in trouble? platforms.” Do your managers understand what is and is not appropriate when disciplining an employee for something posted to a social network? Is your organization’s social media policy supported with education and communication to keep it top of mind? Do you have monitoring in place to recognize and act upon legal, compliance and reputation threats? Are policies in place that govern how your brand participates in social media?cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 23
  29. 29. Your Job is NOT to Raise Your Own Klout Score: cont’d.It’s also important to select tools that can be deployed and support the enterprise. It can be a costly mistake to allow differentparts of the company to secure their own listening platforms, social media management tools, community platforms and othersocial tools. Coordination is necessary to prevent redundancy and conflicting data and systems. Social@Scale means having tofind the right tools that can scale and adapt to different needs for different departments.Once the foundation is in place, the next step is to devise and execute strategies for (and in collaboration with) departmentsthroughout the enterprise. The social team in a larger organization has to think of all the ways the organization will use socialand help peers to understand the needs, processes and tools. This includes not just marketing and PR personnel, but alsocustomer service, human resources, product management, business intelligence and others.Too often, social strategies start in the wrong place--with a focus on a Facebook fan page or Pinterest board. I often find myselfreturning to Forrester’s simple but powerful POST methodology:1. Define the People -- the audience, their social behaviors, etc.2. Set the Objectives: What do you wish to accomplish “Too often, social strategies start in the and how will you measure success?3. Devise the Strategies: How will you achieve those goals? wrong place--with a4. Determine the Tools, Technology and Tactics. This is the stage when you determine if you have the skills and resources you need, the responsibilities for focus on a Facebook personnel, the tools to be used or acquired, etc.Being responsible for social media in a large firm is far fan page ormore about helping others to succeed -- and preventingthem from making costly mistakes -- than developing Pinterest board.”and executing your own ideas and strategies. At the endof the day, your job is to allow hundreds or thousands ofpeople to create value using social platforms and strategies,not raise your own Klout score. Lots of people can do theSocial part, but finding the right leader who can help afirm with the Scale is tougher. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 24
  30. 30. Nicknamed “The King of Social” by Samsung at South by SouthWest, Brett Petersel is constantly connecting people, testing and recommending technology, and always striving to improve the influence and impact of community. Brett is author of “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Twitter Marketing,” and “The Grande Guide to Community Management.” You can follow Brett on Twitter @Brett or at BrettPetersel.com.Time to Get Rid of Your Social Media SilosBY BRETT PETERSELIt only takes one fire to rage out of control to damage a brand’s reputation. That’s why managing Social@Scale should be a criticalrequirement for any global enterprise today. Whether it’s proactive engagement with consumers or reacting to concerns of dissat-isfaction, large companies need to plan and react faster and smarter -- across departments, divisions, cultures and continents.With lessons learned about online reputation management, companies need to constantly listen and engage customers, whereand when they are talking about them. But first they have to scale how they use Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and other social me-dia channels in order to best monitor their brand reputation. And large global enterprises can’t do this in departmental or socialmedia silos.Companies that manage all social media communication across the entire organization using an independent social media man-agement solution to benchmark every action and reaction will succeed. They’ll be able to reduce support traffic and related costsand resources, while increasing personal engagement, improving customer support and developing more valuable relationshipswith customers.The next question I usually hear from companies is: “Who isgoing to handle these responsibilities?” Many departments withinan organization can dedicate themselves to listening, engaging, “It only takes one firemarketing, sharing, responding to and supporting their audiences-- but they’d be missing the point. Again, this is a silo-approach to rage out of controlversus an action taken across the global organization. Largeenterprises have already appointed decision-makers and teams to damage a brand’sacross the organization for approving important communica-tions. By adding Community Managers, these decision-making reputation; largeteams can have a go-to for analyzing how their actions had adirect impact on the company as well as direct online access to companies need to plan and reacttheir SMMS.As more people embrace social media as their weapon of choicefor all things help-related, companies will find themselves yearn-ing for a single platform that will alert and connect them with faster and smarter.”audiences they care about.One platform to rule them all sounds great to me, especially when large companies like Dell, Samsung, Dupont and Cisco alreadyinvested in a global solution to manage all their social media efforts. Now, learning about, communicating with and engagingwith customers old and new has never been easier. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 25
  31. 31. Ted Rubin is the most followed CMO on Twitter. In March 2009, he started using and evangelizing the term ROR, Return on Relationship, a concept he believes is the cornerstone for building an engaged multi-million member database, many of whom are vocal advocates for the brand. He proved the ROR premise with the communities he built as an executive for e.l.f. Cosmetics and OpenSky. His book, Return on Relationship, is due to be released in September. You can follow Ted on Twitter @tedrubin or at his Straight Talk blog.Return on Relationship: Why CompaniesNeed to Embrace Social@ScaleBY TED RUBINSince my social mantra has always been about “Return on Relationship,” it’s refreshing to see a shift in the corporate mindsetregarding the business use of social media. According to a 2012 Social Business Benchmarking Study by FedEx and Ketchum,large companies still view social as a tool for building brand loyalty and strengthening customer relationships (and in myopinion they have a long way to go).However, companies are also beginning to see the benefits of scaling social to other relationship-driven aspects of the business,from enhancing collaboration and dialogue with stakeholders, to strengthening relationships with employees and vendors.And it’s about time! Since everything we do in business relies on developing and strengthening good relationships, why lock themost effective relationship-building tool we have in a marketing closet?Take away the “social media is for marketing” blinders, and allkinds of possibilities within your organization become clear.Shift your approach from Social Marketing to Social Business.The value of Social goes well beyond marketing. “Shift your approachTake a step back and envision ways you could use social tools from Social Marketing to SocialWITHIN your business, especially if your organization hasmultiple centers of operation. Wouldn’t it be nice to have faster,better communication between departments? Share workflowaround projects across time zones? Enhance conversation withexternal stakeholders around the world and quickly open dialog Business. The value of Social goes wellwith new vendors? Of course it would!The power of social communication can get you there becauset enhances the ability to make personal connections happen --and personal connections are what drive business forward. beyond marketing.”cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 26
  32. 32. Return on Relationship: cont’d.We’ve seen a little of this in the way some companies havetapped employees to enhance customer service across socialchannels, expanding those departments from centralized “85 percent ofoperations to team-based collaborative efforts that eliminatewalls. The result is an exponentially increased level of servicethrough expanded human-to-human attention -- something companiesthat no automated system can replicate. surveyed said thatIt’s like a return to the earlier times of doing business beforecommoditization took out the human factor and depersonal-ized business transactions. We knew our neighbors, we knew employeeour local butcher, the grocer, the milkman -- all on a personal,face-to-face basis. Now we’re able to return to that level of participation in company socialpersonal touch because social media has essentially given theconsumer a voice again, and our innate desire to personallyinteract with other people is driving it. I think the FedEx/Ketchum study is a reflection of that recognition and awelcome one. efforts hasAccording to the study, 85 percent of companies surveyedsaid that employee participation in company social efforts increased over thehas increased over the last 12 months. And companies arebeginning to engage their employees internally through last 12 months.”social -- almost 50 percent of those surveyed. That’s a goodstart, but it needs to go even further.Forward-thinking companies should be scaling social to allow diverse team members to collaborate on complex projects inreal time (from anywhere), as well as eliminate bottlenecks that encumber internal processes. More businesses need to tap intothe power of social search to gauge sentiment, get a feel for what’s happening on a global scale, investigate and interact withvendors, and use that information to innovate faster in a shifting marketplace.Does it take retooling your organizational systems? -- Yes.Is it painful? Perhaps, but we only resist change because we’re unable (or unwilling) to visualize the outcome, and those whodon’t adapt to a changing environment quickly die. The ground may be shifting beneath our corporate feet, but we can’t go backto business as usual and survive. We’ve seen social power at work in developing better customer relationships for companies ofevery shape and size. It’s no longer an unknown -- it’s a proven tool.So now is the time, my friends, to take social out of the marketing box and scale it across ALL business in order to truly maxi-mize return on relationships. Embrace it -- own it -- make it part of your business culture, and Social@Scale will help you thrive. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 27
  33. 33. SECTION 3Social@ScaleOrganizational Models
  34. 34. Sarah Evans is the Chief Evangelist at Tracky, an open social collaboration platform. She shares her social media and tech favorites at Sarah’s Faves as well as a daily resource for PR professionals called Commentz. Sarah previously worked with a local crisis center to raise more than $161,000 via social media and is a team member of the Guinness Book World Record holding #beatcancer. You can follow Sarah on Twitter @prsarahevans or at SevansStrategy.com.How to Scale the Social MediaCorporate Team at the Enterprise LevelBY SARAH EVANSCEOs must recognize that the “communication cycle” – the way information originates, spreads and influences – has foreverchanged. We no longer “own” our corporate messages – assuming we ever did, of course. But this ownership shift has created anew, even more vital need for scaling a social media team at the enterprise level.Think about how social media integrates with your culture(internal and external), but don’t overthink it. For now, focuson the short term fix and long term strategy. In larger organiza-tions, new initiatives can die a slow death by committee. You “We no longer ‘own’ our corporatedon’t have time to overthink social and let it becomethe elephant in the room.For most enterprise-level clients, I recommend implementing ahub-and-spoke model. The corporate social media team serves messages.”as the “hub” with other departments within the organizationserving as the “spokes.” The social media team is empoweredby the CEO and, like your PR team, has direct access to keyinternal positions.For example, while you may or may not have a customer service representative as part of your corporate social media team,you may have a liaison from that department. This person knows their fit within the social media structure and may be routedcustomer service inquiries on a regular basis. Depending on the organization, these departmental liaisons may have differentlevels of accountability and responsibility to monitor, respond and follow up with social tasks.It doesn’t matter what your team “in charge” of social media is called, as long as you have the right team.The typical makeup of a corporate social media team looks like this:1. EVP or VP Social Strategy -- This person may oversee all communications efforts with an additional social branch added on. (Some organizations add this to the EVP of Communications or Marketing role).2. Social and Emerging Media Manager -- This position is responsible for day-to-day social activities and implementation of the overall strategy. This person would also serve as point-of-contact with any creative agencies.cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 29
  35. 35. How to Scale the Social Media Corporate Team at the Enterprise Level cont’d.3. Community Manager -- The online voice and perhaps, the “Arm your face of your organization. In order to make this a sustainable role, you may want to have multiple people in this role or rotate responsibilities.4. Social Analyst -- This role is needed to monitor online trends, corporate social media team with track analytics, create internal reports and the like.5. Web Developer and Designer -- This role may be filled by an existing role within an IT team. If you have a large IT team, someone should be appointed to be part of the social team. the right tools and6. Content Manager -- Depending on the size of your organiza- tion, this may be multiple roles. You need people to produce equipment needed to do their jobs.” high-level multimedia content on a regular basis. It’s a full-time job.7. Internal Evangelists -- Employees who love to talk about your organization online (and probably already do). Bring them on as ad hoc members of the team, train them accordingly and empower them to compliment the team.8. Public Relations and/or Communications Liaison -- This is a member of the PR/marketing department who collaborates with the team to ensure messaging is the same across the organization.A bonus... The platforms you use can make or break you.It’s great if you have your corporate model and team in place, but it will be worthless without a clear workflow and the right toolsin place. You must arm your corporate social media team with the right tools and equipment needed to do their jobs. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 30
  36. 36. Jeff Bullas is a digital marketing strategist and one of Forbes’ “Top 50 Social Media Power Influencers.” He is also the author of “Blogging the Smart Way - How to Create and Market your Blog with Social Media.” The JeffBullas.com blog receives over 300,000 hits a month and has 170,000 unique readers. You can follow Jeff on Twitter @JeffBullas or at his personal blog.Why Social@Scale Shouldn’tBe Left to the InternsBY JEFF BULLASThere are many myths about social media marketing but the biggest one by far is that it is easy and can be done by an internat lunch time.For medium to large enterprises, is it is far from simple because social media marketing does not scale very easily and itrequires many resources, skills and processes that until recently were at an adolescent stage of development.With social media marketing you need to: Write, film and capture the content. “social media market- Edit the content into a creative format that entertains, educates and inspires. ing does not scale very Create it for the different types of media such as video, text (for blog posts), Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and other major easily and it requires social media networks. many resources, skills Establish processes that control the publishing and monitor- ing of the content that is spread globally by many individuals within one organization that keeps the brand police happy. and processes that Publish it on multiple networks. until recently were Optimize it for a variety of multimedia formats. at an adolescent stage Develop and optimize it for many types of screens including laptops, iPads, iPhones, Android smartphones and tablets so that it renders properly and is easily consumed. of development.” Optimize the content and platforms for search engines. Monitor and measure the data you receive to see what works and what doesn’t.cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 31
  37. 37. Why Social@Scale Shouldn’t Be Left to the Interns cont’d.It is becoming a deluge of data on many social networks.So far, organizations in the main are using disparate and multiple tools such as Hootsuite, Tweetdeck and Klout that adda layer of complexity and are silos of data and processes that do not lend themselves to the era of big social data.Help is at hand.Tools and processes are emerging to make it possible to do Social@Scale.Some enterprise class platforms will be able to deliver on the promise of one stop social solutions platforms that will enableorganizations to do “Social@Scale.”I look forward to this emerging evolution of social media marketing as it moves from adolescent promise to mature and robustbusiness class platforms and processes..We are seeing the rise of the “Ninja Nerd” who understands technology and the creative process on an increasingly social web. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 32
  38. 38. Chris Brogan is president of Human Business Works, a publishing and media company devoted to promoting the Human Business Way. He frequently consults with Fortune 500 companies on the future of business communica- tion including the impact of social networks and mobile technology. Chris is also the co-author of “Trust Agents” and author of “Google+ for Business: How Google’s Social Network Changes Everything.” You can follow him on Twitter @chrisbrogan or at ChrisBrogan.com.Six Areas Where to FocusYour Social@Scale EnergyBY CHRIS BROGANFor those complaining that social media doesn’t scale, the trick is this: We equate these tools to personal relationships. Becauseof that, we can’t just open a “call center” for many of the touchpoints. However, as we move forward, and these tools become thenew phone, the new radio, the new TV, it’s no longer going to be a world of solo trust agents, but trust agencies.Will you be ready?When I talk about scaling your efforts, here are the areasI’m talking about: “Add to client1. Listening/Monitoring – In my estimation, every social media effort has to have this at the core. You can split up the listening/monitoring chores so that each member of your relations when team owns some level of the process. For instance, your PR person can use the tools to listen for crisis issues, for storytell- you can, from internal resources. ing opportunities, etc. Your customer service people can use the tools to enhance their communication. Your marketers can listen for opportunities. Although you’re splitting the vast bucket of information that comes in during listening, someone should still own it. Maybe that’s the product lead, the manager It pays off.” of that line of business, whoever is responsible for the bottom line. They should have their eyes on listening the entire time.2. Customer Service – Some companies already have this nailed down. Dell, Comcast and Zappos have built great customer service integrations using social channels. This area seems the most important to scale. Customer service is a tireless experi- ence and requires prompt attention. You need a deep bench. I think Frank at Comcast has 14 people on his team at this point, to give you a sense of it. Of all the social media tasks, this is tied for the most time consuming and most important (client relations is the other). Learning how to scale this might be nuanced and customized, but just knowing this is the hardest part might be enough to get you a little further.cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 33
  39. 39. Six Areas Where to Focus Your Social@Scale Energy cont’d.3. Client Relations – I separate client relations from customer service because I think this part includes managing things like Facebook groups, managing blog comments, etc. It’s the “There’s no problem, but I’d like to keep you warm” part of business. You sometimes see “community manager” in this role (though I see the best community managers combining a few of the above topics). This is also the hardest of the brand promises, because if you’re nice to me on Twitter, but your counter help stinks, did you really move the needle? I vote no. And if you start offering this to your customer base, you’ve got to maintain it. Reduce the hours spent here at your own risk.4. Social Marketing – This area involves things like finding new customers via Twitter, coming up with YouTube challenges, etc. Social marketing is probably the easiest area to scale, but it’s also the one where you can see the most obvious results of marketing campaigns. For instance, if you build a loyalty program and you need sign-ups, you can count pretty easily how many people took advantage of your offer -- and you know whether or not to devote more attention to it.5. Sales Prospecting – Your sales team should already be realizing the sales benefits of the social web. Every day, someone’s out there talking about their needs, and giving you a sense of how you could sell to them. These opportunities require a bit of time, but no more so than old fashioned prospecting. Switch out some of your time from sifting through phone books or wherever you find your customers, and dedicate it to searching for new clients on the web tools on the web. For ongoing relationships, if you’re not keeping tabs on their social presence, you’re missing the opportunity to know how they’re doing before you make your important sales calls. This doesn’t take a ton of time, but requires you to build it into your process.6. Publishing – Blogging, shooting videos, content development – that’s where much of your time gets eaten up, and yet, that’s also where a lot of the value comes from. My blog posts may seem like they are given away for free, but some will generate a query for business. Publishing should never be considered the thing to slip. Hell, it’s the product sometimes, and other times, it’s the best advertising you could ever create. Never skimp on publishing.Where Does That Leave You?I’ve told you that everything’s important and that nothing can be cut back. So where do you scale? Spread listening/monitoring as deep as you can. Enhance customer service and deepen that bench internally. Add to client relations when you can, from internal resources. It pays off. Social marketing can be augmented by external help. Sales prospecting is a sales job, but can be augmented. Publishing is important, but can be augmented by external help.That’s how I see it. Again, if you’re talking about smaller scale operations, you’ll have to find the mix. I’ve put it almostin order of importance, from top to bottom. You can shuffle it a bit. Is that how you see it? SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 34
  40. 40. Jason Falls is an author, speaker and CEO of Social Media Explorer, a digital marketing agency and information products company. An award-winning social media strategist and widely read industry pundit, Jason has been noted as a top influencer in the social technology and marketing space by Forbes, Entrepreneur, Advertising Age and others. He is the co-author of two books: “No Bullshit Social Media: The All-Business, No-Hype Guide To Social Media Marketing” (2011), and “The Rebel’s Guide To Email Marketing,” due in September 2012. You can follow Jason on Twitter @JasonFalls or at SocialMediaExplorer.com.Social Media Software isOnly Part of the EquationBY JASON FALLSAs much as I’m sure many involved with this project would love it if I said what the enterprise needs to be Social@Scale was anifty software platform, it’s far more complex a problem to solve than code can provide. Social@Scale is only feasible with threecore tenets:1. Personnel2. Environment “I like to think of a3. ConsistencyYou have to have the right people to make Social@Scale happen. ‘dialed-in’ socialAnd it’s not always just throwing more people at the problem,it’s making sure the right people are in place. Assigning fran- team like an old school newsroomchise store managers the task of performing the local end ofsocial media is often a mistake. The manager may not have theinterest or inclination to tackle social on top of his or her otherresponsibilities. on deadline.”Having team members that are in tune with a collaborative andnimble environment is helpful. I like to think of a “dialed-in”social team like an old school newsroom on deadline. As issuesarise online, segments of the team swarm into action, responding, routing, discussing opportunities. Yes, this might happen withone social media manager at the corporate level and two assigned local or departmental contacts within the company, but itcould also be a war room full of “engagement” experts in a large enterprise with a high volume of always-on conversations.Your environment includes everything from the software you use to the workflow built in with compliance and legal to ensureyour responses can be as fast and efficient as possible.Southwest Airlines realized responding an hour after a customer complained about something online was far too long. So atleast one member of senior management and one person from the company’s legal team is now on-call, 24-7, to respond tosocial media issues. And last I checked, they were required to respond to any situation that arises in minutes, not hours.cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 35

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