Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Field Journal: Geography 5
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Field Journal: Geography 5

668

Published on

This field journal was created by photos taken on two field trips with my Geography 5 Lab class.

This field journal was created by photos taken on two field trips with my Geography 5 Lab class.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
668
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Field Journal Geography 5 Kiran Simmons November 29, 2010
  • 2. Field Trip One October 9, 2010 Mormon Rocks, Cinder Hill, Fossil Falls
  • 3. Mormon Rocks
  • 4. Taken Mid-day 10/9/10 The Mormon Rocks are a notable sight in the Cajon Pass, named after being a landmark to Mormon settlers moving from Salt Lake City to Southern California. The Cajon Pass was created by the San Andreas Fault, and the rocks are evidence of the fault running under the ground, splitting the Pacific and North American Plate. Due to the distinctive look of the rocks, they remain a geographic landmark in the area to this day.
  • 5. Granular Structure One interesting feature of the Mormon Rocks is the geographic history it reveals by looking at the sandstone up close. The different sediments and layers of rock show natural events such as years that had a lot of precipitation versus drought years. Back when water ran through the area, it carried sediments that eventually formed these unique rocks. This up close image shows the granular texture of the Mormon Rocks. Taken Mid-day 110/9/10 In this image, individual rocks in the sandstone are visible. Granular Structure of the Mormon Rocks
  • 6. This area in the Cajon Pass used to have water flowing through it in the form of a stream. Times of flash floods or drier years can be seen in the sediments of the Mormon Rocks. This image shows the dry stream bed and the arrows point toward from where the water flowed. Taken Mid-day 10/9/10 Mormon Rocks
  • 7. Taken Mid-day 10/9/10 The Cajon Pass between the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains is an important link between the Los Angeles metropolitan area and the high desert. The pass was created by the southern segment of San Andreas Fault, and this image depicts the rift zone that created this unique geographic area.
  • 8. Cinder Hill
  • 9. Taken Afternoon 10/9/10 Red Hill, or Cinder Hill, is a unique geographic landmark in the Coso Volcanic field between the Sierra Nevada and Inyo Mountain ranges. It is a basaltic cinder cone, which gives it a reddish hue. It is surrounded other basalt formations and lava flows. Today the hill is mined for it’s unique color. Obsidian and other mineral are prominent in the area.
  • 10. Taken Afternoon 10/9/10 This image displays a basaltic lava flow that has hardened in the Coso volcanic field. This shows how this lava moved and gives an idea of how the area was when it was active. This lava flow is among many other appearances of basalt in this Inyo County region by Cinder Hill.
  • 11. Taken Afternoon 10/9/10 This image shows the dried up stream bed near Fossil Falls in the Coso Field in Inyo County, California. This stream went through Fossil Falls and was fed by melt water from glaciers in the Sierra Nevada. One unique feature of the rivers formed by runoff was the way they were diverted by lava formations in the area.
  • 12. Fossil Falls
  • 13. Taken Afternoon 10/9/10 Fossil Falls is an extremely unique geographical feature in Inyo County, California. The Falls were formed by melt water from glaciers (called the Tioga) in the Sierra Nevadas that flowed into what became a river. When the river traveled continuously over the lava flow, it caused the basalt to become smooth which created Fossil Falls unique look.
  • 14. Taken Afternoon 10/9/10 Another unique feature seen at Fossil Falls are Metate Holes. The holes look almost perfectly circular and are very smooth. They were created when pieces of debris would drill into the basalt from the water flow and continue to spin and make the holes. Metate Holes
  • 15. Taken Afternoon 10/9/10 Native Americans that lived in the area used obsidian from the Coso Mountains to make tools and weapons. Millions of pieces of obsidian litter the ground to this day. This image cannot capture they way the ground glistens with the mineral, but in the circled part of the image, a flake that has retained an arrowhead shape is visible. This piece of obsidian has retained an arrowhead shape.
  • 16. Taken: Afternoon 10/9/10 Petroglyph This is a petroglyph that was done by a Native American who lived in the Coso region thousands of years ago. The meaning of the petroglyph is debated; one theory is that the image depicts a hunting scene. At the bottom of the illustration is a human-like figure, and above it Coso desert big-horn sheep native to the area are depicted. The Coso region has much prehistoric artwork that should be preserved, but it is in danger of being defaced.
  • 17. Taken: Afternoon 10/9/10 This image contains a house ring(which I have tried to outline). These rings of rock were used to make living quarters for the Native Americans in the Coso volcanic field. The people that resided in the region usually stayed in the Sierra Nevadas in the summer for the cooler climate and would migrate to the flatter drier valley in the winter.
  • 18. Field Trip Two November 5-7,2010 Mt, Whitney, Diaz Lake, Keough Hot Springs, Mono Lake, Panum Crater, June Lake Loop, Convict Lake, Eastern California Museum, Manzanar
  • 19. Mt. Whitney
  • 20. Taken: Afternoon 11/5/10 This image was taken in Lone Pine, California, and shows the highest peak in the state, Mt. Whitney. Mt. Whitney also has the highest elevation in the contiguous United States at 14,505 feet. The mountains sit in the Sierra Nevada Mountain range, which run 400 miles north and south and were caused by granite uplift. Mt. Whitney
  • 21. Taken: Afternoon 11/6/10 This is an example of an orographic effect because glaciations created this valley and pushed out the debris in the form of moraines at the foot of the mountains. Glaciation has caused the “U” shaped valleys of the Sierra Nevadas, while the Inyo Mountains exhibit “V” shaped relief from rainfall. The mountains formed by granite uplift. Orographic Effect
  • 22. Taken: Afternoon 11/5/10 The Inyo Mountains are a range that sit just east of the Sierra Nevadas. The Inyos are in the rain shadow of the Sierras, making them more dry. They have lower elevation than the Sierras and are a fault-block range in the Basin and Range. The Inyos have unique vegetation from being located in the rain shadow of the Sierras which can be seen by the pines that sit near the top of the peaks. The mountains date back to the Pre- Cambrian and Cambrian time periods and helped form the Owens Valley.
  • 23. Taken: Afternoon 11/5/10 Alluvial Fan There are many alluvial fans along the bases of mountains, including this image of fans at the base of the Inyo Mountains. It is named after the fanned-out shape that occurs when water flows from a higher elevation and spreads as it reaches flatter ground. Alluvial fans are common in the Basin and Range, and the boxed areas shows the shape of an alluvial fan.
  • 24. Diaz Lake
  • 25. Diaz Lake Taken: Afternoon 11/5/10 Diaz Lake lies between the Sierra Nevada and Inyo Mountains. It is a sag pond that was created after an earthquake along the Lone Pine Fault in 1872 caused the land to sink. It is called a sag pond because when the land was displaced by the quake and sunk water filled the spot.
  • 26. Lone Pine Fault Taken Afternoon 11/5/10 The Lone Pine Fault is visible here at the base of the Alabama Hills. In 1872 a large earthquake was cause by vertical and right-lateral displacement along the fault. The quake caused much destruction to the surrounding towns, was responsible for 29 deaths, and led to the formation of Diaz Lake.
  • 27. Keough Hot Springs
  • 28. Keough Hot Springs Interesting geographic features in this area of California are hot springs. There are many located here in the Long Valley Caldera, and they are heated by underground volcanic activity.
  • 29. s This is an example of one of the Keough Hot Springs we waded in on the trip. These springs are warmed by hot rocks from volcanic activity underground. Going to pools farther down stream, I could feel the heat of the water decrease.
  • 30. Mono Lake
  • 31. Mono Lake Mono Lake is a hyper saline lake in Mono County, California. It is a dead lake (has no outlet) which increases the salinity and alkalinity of the lake. The water level has decreased enormously by the tributaries of the Mono Basin being diverted to the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Mono Lake is famous for its lack of ecology with the exception of brine shrimp, alkali flies, and importance to migratory birds. Another unique feature of the lake is the tufa towers that stick out of the water. A movement to restore Mono Lake was started by David Gaines with his creation of the Mono Lake Committee in 1978. Mono Lake is a very rare geographic feature, and the story of the lake has been greatly influenced by humans.
  • 32. Taken: Mid-day 11/6/10 This image shows the 2 well known islands in Mono Lake. Paoha Island, on the right, is a volcanic island that formed in the 17th Century. The pale look of the island is caused by clay and other sediments on the island. Negit Island is older than Paoha, and is a volcanic cone. It is dark because it was composed by lava flows and is a very important habitat for migratory birds, including the California Gull. The receding water levels in Mono Lake have created a land bridge to the islands at some points which endangers the nesting and reproduction of birds by making them vulnerable to predators. The Islands of Mono Lake
  • 33. After World War II, the city of Los Angeles wanted more water brought into the area. The answer the city found was diverting the tributary streams of the Mono Basin into the Los Angeles Aqueduct and moving the water 350 miles south. With Mono Lake no longer receiving freshwater, the lake level dropped. The image reveals former shorelines that appeared as the lake steadily shrank, which can also be seen with the revealing of the tufa formations. It is believed that the lake used to be enormous at the end of the Ice Age. Strandlines can be seen in the volcanic hills, and above the “LV” in Lee Vining (which we saw outside from Nicely’s). With a large following that aims to save the lake, a restoration project is underway to return some of the water to Mono. Though the damage is extensive and the lake will not be back to any original state, this is a victory for the Mono Lake Committee. Former Shorelines of Mono Lake
  • 34. Tufa Formations One of the most intriguing and unique features of Mono Lake is the tufa towers that protrude out of the lake and stand on its shores. These formed when underground freshwater springs entered the lake. This caused the spring water to react with the alkaline water of the lake. Calcium carbonate(limestone) forms from the meeting of the two types of water. Because tufa growth relies on the reaction within the water, they only expand under the surface. The fact that the tufa are visible above the surface are evidence of the shrinking lake.
  • 35. Burn Area One danger is this area of California is wild fires. They can be caused by multiple reasons including lightning and human action . Sometimes control fires are set on purpose to maintain the habitat and prevent future further damage by fire. This photo taken on Panum Crater shows past burn areas.
  • 36. Panum Crater
  • 37. Panum Crater Panum Crater is a volcanic cone next to Mono Lake (which can be seen in the background of this photo). It is one of Mono-Craters, the newest mountain range in North America, and formed only around 600 years ago. The crater formed when magma heated water under the surface causing an enough pressure to blow off the top of the land. Cinders shot into the air and came back down ,forming a cinder cone over the original vent. This is an example of a rhyolitic, plug dome volcano. Panum Crater Cinder Cone
  • 38. This image of the Sierra Nevadas, taken from Panum Crater, shows a glaciated valley and the moraines that formed as a result. A glacier placed pressure on the mountain, carving out this valley and displacing the till toward the base of the mountain. These collections of debris look like little hills and are called moraines.
  • 39. June Lake Loop
  • 40. Grant Lake is a reservoir in the June Lake Loop that feeds into Rush Creek. The creek is supposed to eventually flow into Mono Lake but has been diverted into the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Grant Lake is the largest lake in the loop, but because of its role as part of the aqueduct, the water level can vary. Around the lake are moraines that were caused by glaciers in the area.
  • 41. “U” shaped valley caused by a glacier Moraine This is an closer view of a moraine of the Sierras. A glacier carved out this valley by pushing debris from the mountain and by forming what looks like hills. The mound that was deposited is in front of where the glacier was, making it a terminal moraine. Taken Afternoon 11/6/10
  • 42. Silver Lake Silver Lake is one of the four lakes in the horseshoe shaped June Lake Loop. The Loop is a very scenic route whose configuration was molded by a glacier. This lake is popular to visitors because of its beauty and is used largely for trout fishing.
  • 43. Waterfall visible from shore of Silver Lake Although it is difficult to see in the image, within the box a waterfall is highlighted. There are many waterfalls in the scenic June Lake Loop. This is a smaller one, but some are very large.
  • 44. Convict Lake
  • 45. Picturesque Convict Lake is nestled in the Sierra Nevadas. The name of the lake derives from a group of convicts who had escaped from Carson City Prison in 1871 and were caught and hanged at what became Convict Creek. In this picture Paleozoic metamorphic rock is visible. The rocks are the oldest in the Sierra Mountains, and the image shows the variation of color in the rocks which are created by chemical changes from heat and pressure. Taken: Afternoon 11/6/10 The Oldest Rocks in the Sierra Nevadas Convict Lake
  • 46. Lateral Moraine Lateral Moraine Terminal Moraine Convict Lake This photo points out the lateral and terminal moraines visible at Convict Lake. A glacier carved out this area pushing the debris along the sides in the lateral moraines and in front in the terminal moraine.
  • 47. Eastern California Museum
  • 48. Eastern California Museum Taken Afternoon 11/7/10 As a history buff, I selected the original sign at Manzanar s the most intriguing artifact at the Eastern California Museum. I think that the United States response to Japanese Americans during World War II is a fascinating part of the country’s past. With Manzanar being the most famous camp with books such as Farewell to Manzanar written about it, I am surprised it is not in a more mainstream museum. I found it interesting that it is not far from its original location and presented very subtly.
  • 49. Manzanar
  • 50. Manzanar Manzanar is the most famous of the Japanese internment camps opened by the U.S. Government during World War II. Manzanar is located in the Owens Valley, near Lone Pine. Almost 120,000 Japanese Americans were forced here before the closing of the camp in 1945 . The dust and extreme weather were harsh conditions for the people, as were close living quarters and the initial loss of possessions.
  • 51. Taken: Afternoon 11/7/10 These stone guard houses are some of the few remaining structures at Manzanar. In the background of this image are the Inyo Mountains. This image also gives an idea of how barren the land around Manzanar is. After Manzanar was closed in 1945, the inhabitants were forced to leave and much of the wood used in the buildings at Manzanar was used to build up Lone Pine.
  • 52. Taken Afternoon 11/7/10 The image is concrete that still stands at Manzanar. Engraved in it are the names of the Japanese-American men who helped build this structure. Residents of the camp built the relocation center up to a basically a functioning city that had everything from a garden to recreational sports. Manzanar
  • 53. Extra
  • 54. These next photographs contain unusual events, sightings of wildlife, weather related phenomena, and added stops. This image shows the “wildlife” our class brought to Convict Lake in the form of a beaver puppet. Taken: Afternoon 11/6/10 Kiran Simmons
  • 55. Kiran Simmons Taken: Morning 11/6/10 This was the first sighting of wildlife on the trip, but unfortunately it was a hunted male deer. We saw this buck at a gas station in Big Pine before we left for Mono Lake. I had never seen a freshly hunted carcass in person before, but the hunters told us they eat most of the deer.
  • 56. Taken: Mid-day11/6/10 This was an unusual event the class saw when we got out of the cars at Mono Lake. We did not know the cause of the fire, but the smoke got less grey and more black with time. Sometimes control fires are set on purpose, so this could have been deliberately lit. The unknown source of the fire Fire
  • 57. Taken: Mid-day 11/6/10 Another wildlife sighting and unusual event was the amount of dead birds on the shore of Mono Lake. The workers at the Mono Lake Bookstore did not know the reason for the phenomenon. This is something that people need to study and be aware of to see what is happening to the ecosystem at the lake.
  • 58. Kiran Simmons Taken: Evening 11/6/10 On our way back from the Mammoth area on Saturday, we stopped at Schat’s Bakery and these ducks were in the stream where we parked. The unique part was that I saw wild ducks for the first time. They were larger and had a different body shape than domesticated ducks. Wild Ducks
  • 59. Taken: Afternoon 11/7/10 Changing Leaves One weather related phenomena we saw on the trip was leaves that had changed color. It was described that for the leaves to change so profoundly , warm days and cool nights need to occur. The weather must have been ideal for these conditions because the leaves were bold colors. This picture from the Eastern California Museum shows the transitioning colors of the trees.
  • 60. Taken: Afternoon 11/7/10 Another weather related phenomena that occurred while we were on our field trip were the clouds. The type of clouds above us signified an approaching storm. The whole trip the group was discussing what type of clouds were in the sky. The clouds also showed snow falling on Mammoth.
  • 61. Optional Photographs Me at Convict Lake, 11/6/10
  • 62. This alluvial fan sits at the base of the San Gabriel and is visible by the amount of building that has occurred on the flat deposit. I have lived in this area my whole life and never thought of these noticeable features in geographic terms.
  • 63. This solar power plant is a little after Kramer Junction on Highway 395. It is the largest group of solar panels I have ever seen in person. This is one of the three power plants owned by the Kramer Junction Company in this area. Together these sites produce the most commercial solar energy in the world.
  • 64. Along the way, I saw several of these Doppler Radars. This was the only one connected to a cement structure. The towers are used to collect information from the atmosphere to make weather predictions.
  • 65. This would be an example of a playa. It is a depression in the ground that is dried out but has the potential to collect water. There is no outlet for the water, so it evaporates back out. In this image there actually is some water in the playa. Kiran Simmons Playa Taken: Afternoon 10/9/10
  • 66. These little hills are the leftover material from mining. The ore or mineral being sought is removed and these tailings are left as waste. These mine tailings appear to be in the middle of no where off Highway 395. It surprised me to think that California is still a state that has mining as an industry.
  • 67. Taken: Afternoon 10/9/10 Garlock Fault It is slightly difficult to see in the picture, but the Garlock Fault runs along the base of Tehachapi Mountains. It is a left lateral strike slip fault, the second longest fault in California, and geologically significant. It borders the Mojave Desert. It is an unusual fault and has potential to move.
  • 68. Joshua Tree Burrowed Grass Creosote Bush Taken Evening 10/9/10 It is a little difficult to see because the photo was taken in transit, but the image contains three major native desert plants. The Joshua Tree is the tallest. The next largest is the Creosote bushes, and the burrowed grass stays very close to the ground to get moisture.
  • 69. This photo was taken on the bridge over the Los Angeles Aqueduct. I am amazed that this just runs openly through so much of California. It also was important to cross because throughout the trip we learned more about the effects the aqueduct had on many of the places the class visited. Los Angeles Aqueduct
  • 70. The Owens Dry Lake could almost be passed on the 395 without noticing it. Not too long ago it was a huge lake in the Owens River Valley. When the City of Los Angeles needed water in the early 1900s, the Owens Valley land was purchased. Water was sent hundreds of miles to the city, and eventually the lake was drained. This has had horrible ecological effects and even caused health problems to residents of the Owens Valley. The Owens Dry Lake is still a point of controversy. In this picture the white soda ash salts can be seen on the empty lake bed floor.
  • 71. SETI Towers Taken: Mid-day 11/6/10 The SETI towers are located between Big Pine and Mono along Highway 395. They are used to search for extra terrestrial signals. They are placed in the desert between the Sierras and Inyos to reduce other signals getting in the way.
  • 72. Works Cited The, By. "Convict Lake, California." Internet Accuracy Project. Web. 27 Nov. 2010. <http://www.accuracyproject.org/town-ConvictLake.html>. "CVO Website - Panum Crater." USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO). Web. 25 Nov. 2010. <http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/LivingWith/VolcanicPast/Notes/panum_crater.html>. "Grant Lake Reservoir Spills | The Mono-logue." Mono Lake. Web. 27 Nov. 2010. <http://www.monolake.org/today/2010/07/12/grant-lake-reservoir-spills/>. "History of the LA Aqueduct." Index of /. Web. 27 Nov. 2010. <http://wsoweb.ladwp.com/Aqueduct/historyoflaa/index.htm>. "How Volcanoes Work - Fissure Eruptions." SDSU - Department of Geological Sciences. Web. 24 Nov. 2010. <http://www.geology.sdsu.edu/how_volcanoes_work/Fissure.html>. "June Lake California, June Lake Information, June Lake Loop, Marinas, Gull Lake, Grant Lake, Silver Lake, June Lake Resort." Mammoth Lakes : Lake Tahoe : Big Bear : Lodging Reservations : Vacation Condo Rentals: City Concierge Resort Reservations. Web. 25 Nov. 2010. <http://www.cityconcierge.com/mammoth-lakes/activities/june-lake.asp>. "Kramer Junction Solar Electric Generating Station." The CLUI Land Use Database. Web. 27 Nov. 2010. <http://ludb.clui.org/ex/i/CA9679/>. Lagos, By Marisa. "MONO COUNTY / Road Shut by Wildfire Reopens - SFGate." Featured Articles From The SFGate. 07 June 2007. Web. 27 Nov. 2010. <http://articles.sfgate.com/2007-06-07/bay- area/17251181_1_fire-season-hand-crews-two-outbuildings>. "Paradigm Shifts, Rock Art Studies, and the Coso Sheep Cult of Eastern California." Petroglyphs, Pictographs and Rock Art. Web. 27 Nov. 2010. <http://www.petroglyphs.us/article_coso_sheep_cult.htm>. "Restoration of the Mono Basin." Mono Lake. Web. 27 Nov. 2010. <http://www.monolake.org/mlc/restoration>. Schmidt, Lisa. Field Trip. Inyo County, Mono County. Oct.-Nov. 2010. Lecture. "Tufa." Interesting Thing of the Day. Web. 27 Nov. 2010. <http://itotd.com/articles/481/tufa/>. "Volcanoes of the Eastern Sierra Nevada." Indiana University. Web. 28 Nov. 2010.

×