Starting points to integrate information and communication technology

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Starting points to integrate information and communication technology

  1. 1. Starting points to integrate information and communication technology into the teaching <br />EARLI CONFERENCE 2011<br />EXETER<br />Susanna Pöntinen & Stina HacklinUniversity of Eastern Finland<br />
  2. 2. Structure of the presentation<br />backroundinformation<br />researchcontext<br />researchproblem<br />researchquestions and data collection<br />analyze and results<br />diskussion<br />
  3. 3. backroundinformationresearchcontext<br />discourseanalysis<br />how we talk about educational technology<br />broad issue –there are many understandable ways(e.g. Jokinen 1999; Fairclough 2007)<br />
  4. 4. backroundinformationresearchcontext<br />at school ICT is seen as integration <br />a tool - not way of living <br />update existing practices - not new way of working<br />based on choices – not a part of everyday life<br />recently differences between generations (“digital natives” – “digital immigrants”) e.g. Kozma 2003; Ertmer 2010; Valtonen 2011; Prensky 2005; Oblinger & Oblinger 2005<br />
  5. 5. backroundinformationresearchproblem and data collection<br />how differences effect on teaching and learning?<br />describe and understand teacher students views about integration of ICT in education in teacher training context<br />teacher students’ written learning diaries as research data<br />
  6. 6. backroundinformationresearchquestions<br />how teacher students construct their generation as “digital native” teacher generation- analyzes: rhetorical strategies (ways of talk)<br />what is the meaning of how teacher students construct themselves as “digital native” generation in ICT integration- analyzes: combination of rhetorical strategies <br />
  7. 7. analysis and resultshow teacher students construct their generation as “digital natives”? <br />by using following rhetorical strategies :<br />quantification (in school context – out of school contextexplaining how long and how much they have used ICT)<br />e.g. “I have not used that much ICT” o30 “I remember once in grades 1-6 I wrote a story using word processor” o31“ICT in schools has increased tremendously in recent times” o29<br />turning points (in the past: what changes has happened - in the future: what should be changed and what will change)<br />e,g, “I have used computer since I was about 7” o50; ”… to developattitudestowardstechnologicalworld” o20 “In the future, I believe that the role of ICT will be big” o6<br />
  8. 8. analysis and resultshow teacher students construct their generation as “digital natives”? <br />separating ICT use from own interests (changes in talk from personal perspectives to more general; from active to passive)<br />e.g. “I use ICT … generation use ICT … everybody are using ICT”“"I manage quite well ... I believe that the future will bring us more options ... instructing teachers to better use of ICT ... perhaps each pupil could have ... if the costs should be possible to treat" o15 <br />making distinctions (between school life and out of school life, between generations, comparisons with others )<br />e.g. “…almost all learning in ICT took place out of school context…” o26“…I am used to using computers, what necessarily all the older teachers are not…” o25“…compared inside my generation, I'm sure my skills are lagging behind… o10<br />making commitments (competence descriptions, adequacy of personal skills)<br />e.g. “I would need a lot of training in using computers. My current my skills are limited… “ o1“My strength lies in my ability to guide students to collaborative work, so I think that these teamwork skills I am able to use also in ICT” o9<br />
  9. 9. analysis and resultswhat is the importance of how teacher students construct themselves as “digital native” generation in ICT integration?<br />for students there are many important ways to talk about ICT integration<br />inside rhetorical strategies there were differences (e.g. hesitation – assurance)<br />“I suppose I’m part of the generation…” o48<br />“… I’m experienced user… ” o34<br />-> the students are not equally “digital native”, but…e.g. Bennet 2008; Helsper 2010; Jones 2010<br />
  10. 10. analysis and resultswhat is the importance of how teacher students construct themselves as “digital native” generation in ICT integration?<br /><ul><li>betweenrhetoricalstrategiestherearesimilarities –ittellswhat is the meaning of ICT in schoolcontext</li></ul>new in schoolcontextespecially in quantificationand making distinctions<br />integrates school to societyespecially in separating ICT use from own interests and making distinctions and making commitments<br />renew teachingespecially in turning points and making commitments<br />have to supportlearningespecially in making distinctions and making commitments<br />
  11. 11. discussion<br /><ul><li>ICT in teaching and learning in schoolcontextratherparticipationthanintegration</li></ul>active – passiveinvolvement<br />cultural – contextualaspect<br />e.g. Arvaja 2007; Kumpulainen 2007; Ertmer 2010; Selwyn 2010<br />
  12. 12. Thankyou!<br />References:<br />Arvaja, M. (2007). Contextual perspective in analysing collaborative knowledge construction of two small groups in web-based discussion. International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, 2(2), 133-158.<br />Bennett, S., Maton, K., & Kervin, L. (2008). The'digital natives' debate: A critical review of the evidence. British Journal of Educational Technology, 39(5), 775-786.<br />Ertmer, P. A., & Ottenbreit-Leftwich, A. T. (2010). Teacher technology change: How knowledge, confidence, beliefs, and culture intersect. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 42(3), 255-284.<br />Fairclough, N. (2007). Language and globalization Taylor & Francis e-Library.<br />Helsper, E., & Eynon, R. (2010). Digital natives: Where is the evidence? British Educational Research Journal, 36(3), 503-520.<br />Jokinen, A., Juhila, K., & Suoninen, E. (Eds.). (1999). Diskurssianalyysi liikkeessä. Tampere: Vastapaino.<br />
  13. 13. Jones, C., Ramanau, R., Cross, S., & Healing, G. (2010). Net generation or digital natives: Is there a distinct new generation entering university? Computers & Education, 54, 722-732.<br />Kozma, R. B. (2003). Technology and classroom practices: An international study. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 36(1), 1-14. <br />Kumpulainen, K., & Renshaw, P. (2007). Cultures of learning. International Journal of Educational Research, 46(3-4), 109-115.<br />Oblinger, D., & Oblinger, J. (Eds.). (2005). Educating the net generation EDUCAUSE.<br />Prensky, M. (2005). Listen to the natives. Educational Leadership, 63(4), 8-13. <br />Selwyn, N. (2010). Schools and schooling in the digital age. London and New York: Routledge. <br />Valtonen, T., Pontinen, S., Kukkonen, J., Dillon, P., Väisänen, P., & Hacklin, S. (2011). Confronting the technological pedagogical knowledge of finnish net generation student teachers. Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 20(1), 3-18. <br />

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