Strategies for psm funding 20121109 v1
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Professional Science Masters Funding Strategy with Big Business

Professional Science Masters Funding Strategy with Big Business

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  • Reference content from this presentation as: Spohrer, JC (2012) Strategies for PSM Funding. NPSMA Workshop Teleconference. Nov 9th, 2012.
  •  NPSMA 3rd NATIONAL CONFERENCE 10:30-11:15 (MDT) Workshop Session 5 (Crystal I)
  • Professional Science Master's Degrees Recognizing that traditional graduate-level science training may not be suitable for non-academic careers, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation , in 1997, began to support master’s-level degree programs designed to provide science, technology, engineering, and mathematics ("STEM") students with a pathway into science-based careers [1] . These Professional Science Master’s degrees combine a science or mathematics curriculum with a professional component designed to provide graduates with the necessary skills for a career in business, government, or nonprofit agencies. [2] Originally funding fourteen campuses, the Sloan Foundation expanded its support directly or indirectly to over fifty institutions, collectively offering over 100 different PSM programs.[1]. In 2005, the Foundation funded the Council of Graduate Schools to be an “institutional base for PSM growth, with the goal of making the degree a normal, recognized, widely accepted academic offering”[1]. In furtherance of this objective, the Sloan Foundation also provided support to found the National Professional Science Master’s Association, a professional organization of PSM directors and alumni intended to “provide a collective voice for PSM degree programs”.[3] In 2007, Congress passed the America COMPETES Act which placed special emphasis on improving America’s economic competitiveness by strengthening STEM education. The COMPETES Act specifically mentioned the importance of the PSM degree to the nation’s overall competitiveness.[4]. Additionally, a 2008 report issued by the National Research Council of the National Academies urged the continued expansion of the PSM degree. In 2009, the National Science Foundation, under the auspices of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, facilitated funding of twenty-two different PSM programs by appropriating funds for a Science Master’s program. Information from the KGI Web site. The Sloan Foundation and CGS have worked together since 2006 to institutionalize and promote the PSM degree, an innovative graduate degree designed to allow students to pursue advanced training in science or mathematics, while simultaneously developing workplace skills highly valued by employers. Over the past decade, the PSM has been embraced enthusiastically by the graduate education community in a strong effort to produce the kinds of science and engineering professionals needed to keep the U.S. globally competitive. In only five years since 2006, the PSM has expanded from about 80 programs to 245 at about 115 institutions. By fall 2011 new PSM enrollments in PSM programs around the country had increased to 1,700 and total PSM enrollments to about 5,500.  [For more details, see www.sciencemasters.com]
  • IBM gathers statistics related to the five 6 R’s on 5000 universities world wide… The best relations between IBM and universities involve what we call the five R’s – Research (or open collaborative research with a focus on grand challenge problems for business and society), Readiness (or skills), Recruiting (or jobs working on teams to building a smarter planet), Revenue (which is more and more about public-private partnerships that connect great universities and great cities), Responsibility (where IBM employees share their expertise, time, and resources with universities – including IBM guest lecturing in courses or judging student competitions), and Regions – newest and most important working with regional innovation ecosystems, in conjunction with our IBM Global Entrepreneurs program and SmartCamps…. About 15-20% of awards are in the analytics areas, and we see that growing to 25-33% this coming year and the future…. For more information: http://www.ibm.com/university Bay Area numbers… 300 fulltime hires in last five years 400 interns and co-ops students over 1000 employees who are alumni, between 2-10% executives over $3M in research and matching grant awards, over five times that in matching from government good customers of IBM
  • GCG: Wang Ho for Victor Kuo (since 2010) IBM University Programs (IBM UP) has identified 30 major cities/universities around the world to be our focus in 2010. Of course, we work with over 5000 universities world wide, but nevertheless the focus on 30 cities and universities is important to create some exemplar programs and models…. By 2011 another 30 focus cities/universities will be added, and by 2012 we hope to have as many as 300 cities/universities that are partnering in the area of urban sustainable innovation or “Smarter Cities” …. Primary: US: Boston, New York, Los Angeles, Bay Area/SF-SJ, Atlanta, Miami, Pittsburg, DC-Metro-Baltimore, Houston, Phoenix DV: Dublin, Toronto, London, Karlsruhe, Helsinki, Rome, Dubai, Singapore, Seoul, Tokyo, Melbourne, Porto Portugal EM: Mexico City, Rio De Janerio, Cairo, Duodomo/Dar Saleem, Istanbul, Moscow, India, Beijing, Manila, Bangkok Secondary: US: Detroit-AnnArbor, Philadelphia, Seattle, Denver, Cincinatti, Minneapolis, Chicago,Dallas, Rochester, Raleigh DV: Zurich, Calgary, Manchester-Cambridge, Madrid, Sydney, Paris, Johannesburg, Oslo, Riyadh, HongKong, Osaka EM: Saint Petersburg, Mumbai, Ho Chi Minh City, Buenos Aires, Sao Paolo, Quongzhou, Jordan, Shanghai, Bangalore, Lima Tertiary: US: DV: EM: Girija Cheruvu Texas Italy India Lilian NYC, Texas Japan, S. Korea China Dianne Fodell North Carolina (Raleigh), Boston, Pittsburg London, Helsinki Poland, Mexico, Croatia, Central America Transition 11/2010 Charles Rattan Kumar (ASEAN -> Analytics) -> Fionnie HM Goh (Singapore -> ASEAN)
  • I am interesting in building better models of the world – so need to model these giants…
  • This slides was created by IBM GMU External Relations For information or queries about this presentation please contact: Megan Rosier , Manager, GMU External Relations – [email_address] Karen Davis , Director, GMU External Relations – [email_address]
  • This slides was created by IBM GMU External Relations For information or queries about this presentation please contact: Megan Rosier , Manager, GMU External Relations – [email_address] Karen Davis , Director, GMU External Relations – [email_address]
  • T-shaped people are ready for Teamwork – they are excellent communicators, with real world experience, and deep (or specialized) in at least one culture, one discipline and one systems area, but with good team work skills interacting with others who are deep in other cultures, disciplines and systems areas. Also, T-shaped professionals also make excellent entrepreneurs, able to innovate with others to create new technology, business, and societal innovations. T-shaped people are adaptive innovators, and well prepared for life-long learning in case they need to become deep in some new area… they are better prepared than I-shaped people, who lack the breadth. Therefore, IBM and other public and private organizations are looking to hire more of this new kind of skills and experience profile – one that is both broad and deep.. These organizations have been collaborating with universities around the world to establish a new area of study known as service science, management, engineering, and design (SSMED) – to prepare computer scientists, MBAs, industrial engineers, operations research, management of information systems, systems engineers, and students of many other discipline areas – to understand better how to work on multidisciplinary teams and attack the grand challenge problems associated with improving service systems…
  • This slides was created by IBM GMU External Relations For information or queries about this presentation please contact: Megan Rosier , Manager, GMU External Relations – [email_address] Karen Davis , Director, GMU External Relations – [email_address]
  • Photo: http://blog.ted.com/2012/02/29/four-commandments-for-cities-of-the-future-eduardo-paes-at-ted2012/
  • What are the largest and smallest service system entities that have the problem of interconnected systems? Holistic Service Systems like nations, states, cities, and universities – are all system of systems dealing with flows, development, and governance. =============\\ Nations (~100) States/Provinces (~1000) Cities/Regions (~10,000) Educational Institutions (~100,000) Healthcare Institutions (~100,000) Other Enterprises (~10,000,000) Largest 2000 >50% GDP WW Families/Households (~1B) Persons (~10B) Balance/Improve Quality of Life, generation after generation GDP/Capita Quality of Service Customer Experience Quality of Jobs Employee Experience Quality of Investment-Opportunities Owner Experience Entrepreneurial Experience Sustainability GDP/Energy-Unit % Fossil % Renewable GDP/Mass-Unit % New Inputs % Recycled Inputs
  • http://www.nyu.edu/about/leadership-university-administration/office-of-the-president/redirect/speeches-statements/global-network-university-reflection.html
  • Sources http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM#cite_note-10K-0 http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/33341.wss http://www.fiercecio.com/press-releases/ibm-reports-2010-fourth-quarter-and-full-year-results-nyse-ibm-q4

Strategies for psm funding 20121109 v1 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. IBM University Programs World Wide (IBM UP) Strategies for PSM Funding Working Together to Build a Smarter PlanetDr. Jim Spohrer, spohrer@us.ibm.comInnovation Champion and Director IBM UPwardUniversity Programs worldwide, accelerating regional developmentNov 9, 2012NPSMA Meeting, Denver, CO[Jim on Amtrak Train between San Jose & Berkeley]© IBM 2012 © 2012 IBM Corporation
  • 2. Participants: NPSMA Workshop on “Funding PSM”  Dagmar Beck PSM Program Director, Rice University; NPSMA Immediate Past President  Michael Rappa, Director of the Institute for Advanced Analytics  and Distinguished University Professor, North Carolina State University (via skype)  Deborah Silver, Executive Director, Professional Science Masters Program Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; NPSMA Board Member  James Spohrer, Director, IBM University Programs (via Skype)  Inge Wefes, Associate Dean, Graduate School, University of Colorado Denver IBM University Programs World Wide (IBM UP) © 2012 BM Corporation
  • 3. Professional Science Masters  Graduate-level STEM Pathways for Non-Academic Careers – Professional skills (industry jobs, entrepreneurs, etc.)  Sloan Foundation 1997 – Foundation funding for original 14 campuses  Complexities – Universities funding faculty to create new degree programs – Attracting students to new degree programs – Industry recognition and hiring of new degree programs – Tracking increasing quantity and quality of programs – Tracking success of graduates of programs vs control – Tracking success of faculty who start and maintain programs IBM University Programs World Wide (IBM UP) © 2012 BM Corporation
  • 4. Big Business As A Partner: All About Alignment  Big Business has University Programs (6 R’s)  Big Business is global  Big Business is big – important not to forget how big  Big Business has changing focus (what’s hot this quarter?)  Big Business long-term strategy is helping regions (public sector)  Big Business wants T-shapes <discipline, sectors, cultures>  Big Business wants integrated Science Management Engineering  For example, Big Business analytic platforms for cities  Future? Big Business wants more Entrepreneurs/U-BEE’s! IBM University Programs World Wide (IBM UP) © 2012 BM Corporation
  • 5. IBM University Programs:What We Do: The “6 R’s” (not to be confused with 3 R’s) 1. Research Research awards focus on grand challenge problems and big bets https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/university/research 2. Readiness Access to IBM tools, methods, and course materials to develop skills https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/university/academicinitiative 3. Recruiting Internships and full-time positions working to build a smarter planet http://www.ibm.com/jobs 4. Revenue Improve performance, the university as a complex enterprise (city within city) http://www.ibm.com/services/us/gbs/bus/html/bcs_education.html 5. Responsibility Community service provides access to IBMers expertise/resources http://www.ibm.com/ibm/ibmgives/ 6. Regions Regional innovation ecosystems – incubators, entrepreneurship, jobs http://www.ibm.com/ibm/governmentalprograms/innovissue.html IBM University Programs worldwide, accelerating regional development (IBM UPward) © 2012 BM Corporation
  • 6. Big Business Does Things Globally Region Contact NameAfrica Sean McleanAustralia Jay HannonASEAN Seow Khun LumCanada Stephen PeregutChina Jean LiEgypt Hisham El-ShishineyEMEA Diem HoGCG Wang HaoIndia Bhooshan KelkarJapan Kohzoh KitamuraLatin America Juan DuranMiddle East Andrea EmiliianiNordics Jyrki KoskinenRussia Sergey BelovTurkey Jale Akyel IBM University Programs World Wide (IBM UP) © 2010 IBM Corporation
  • 7. Big Business is Big: Forbes Global 2000  Totals: Largest Publically Traded Businesses – $36 trillion in revenues (45% of 2011 WW GDP) – $2.64 trillion in profits – $149 trillion in assets – $37 trillion in market value – Employ 83 million people worldwide (~1% of 2011 WW Population)  Sectors: – Financial (478), Oil & Gas (131)  Nations – US (524), Japan(258) IBM University Programs World Wide (IBM UP) © 2010 IBM Corporation
  • 8. Bi g Bus i ne s s : W t ’ s Hot ? Ana l yt i c s , Da t a haSc i e nt i s t s • For each industry the journey consists of a series of steps along a path of competencies to reach a smarter outcome for organizations • The power to pull together many sources of data in real time to source actionable insights and optimize clients’ business • Revenue IBM generated from Analytics solutions grew 16% from 2010 Through to 2015, more than 85% of Fortune 500 organizations will fail to exploit ‘big data’ for competitive advantage --Gartner Predictions 20128 IBM GMU External Relations 2012 IBM GMU External Relations 2012
  • 9. IBM GMU External Relations 2012
  • 10. T-shaped professionalsdepth & breadth Ready for Life-Long-Learning Ready for Teamwork Ready to Help Build a Smarter Planet Many cultures Many disciplines Many systems (understanding & communications) BREADTH Deep in one discipline Deep in one system Deep in one culture DEPTH (analytic thinking & problem solving) SSME+D = Service Science, Management, Engineering + Design10 IBM University Programs worldwide, accelerating regional development (IBM UPward) © 2012 BM Corporation
  • 11. A city is essentially a system of service systems—transportation, healthcare, public safety and education. To enable a Smarter City, IBM is working to improve the quality & efficiency of service systems and how they operate and function.11 IBM GMU External Relations 2012 IBM University Programs worldwide, accelerating regional development (IBM UPward) © 2012 BM Corporation
  • 12. IBM University Programs worldwide, accelerating regional development (IBM UPward) © 2012 BM Corporation
  • 13. Four commandments for cities of the future: Eduardo Paes at TED2012 IBM University Programs worldwide, accelerating regional development (IBM UPward) © 2012 BM Corporation
  • 14. IBM University Programs worldwide, accelerating regional development (IBM UPward) © 2012 BM Corporation
  • 15. Smarter Cities Intelligent Operations Platform for Innovation IBM University Programs worldwide, accelerating regional development (IBM UPward) © 2012 BM Corporation
  • 16. Streetline: Instrumented-Interconnected-Intelligent IBM University Programs worldwide, accelerating regional development (IBM UPward) © 2012 BM Corporation
  • 17. Regional Competitiveness and U-BEEs: Where imagined possible worlds become observable real worlds http://www.service-science.info/archives/1056novations Nationniversities/ “The future is already State/Province here (at universities),egions City/Region culus (Cambridge/UK) For-profits it is just not evenlyysics (Cambridge/UK) U-BEEmputer Science (Columbia/NY) distributed.” rosoft (Harvard/WA) Job Creator/Sustainerhoo (Stanford/CA) Hospital Cultural & Universityogle (Stanford/CA) Medical Conference College ebook (Harvard/CA) Research Hotels K-12 “The best way to Non-profits Worker (professional ) Family (household) predict the future is to (inspire the next generation of students to) build it better.” U-BEEs = University-Based Entrepreneurial Ecosystems, City Within City IBM University Programs worldwide, accelerating regional development (IBM UPward) © 2012 BM Corporation
  • 18. A Framework for Global Civil Society  Daniel Patrick Moynihan said nearly 50 years ago: "If you want to build a world class city, build a great university and wait 200 years." His insight is true today – except yesterdays 200 years has become twenty. More than ever, universities will generate and sustain the world’s idea capitals and, as vital creators, incubators, connectors, and channels of thought and understanding, they will provide a framework for global civil society. – John Sexton, President NYU IBM University Programs worldwide, accelerating regional development (IBM UPward) © 2012 BM Corporation
  • 19. IBM’s Leadership Changes IBM has 426,000 employees worldwide 2011 Financials 22% of IBM’s revenue  Revenue - $ 106.9B in Growth Market  Net Income - $ 15.9B countries; growing at  EPS - $ 13.44 11% in 2011  Net Cash - $16.6B More than 40% of IBM’s workforce conducts business away from an office 55% of IBM’s WorkforceIBM operates in 170 is New to the company incountries around the globe the last 5 years Number 1 in patent>100 acquisition in decade generation for 19100 Years of Business consecutive years ;& Innovation in 2011 6,180 US patents awarded in 2011 The Smartest Machine On Earth 9 time winner of the 5 Nobel President’s National Laureates Medal of Technology & Innovation - latest “Let’s Build a Smarter Planet" award for Blue Gene Supercomputer IBM University Programs worldwide, accelerating regional development (IBM UPward) © 2012 BM Corporation