Collaborative Consent<br />Harnessing the strengths of the Internet<br /> for consent in the online environment<br />
The symbiosis in the Web<br />Data gatherers and data subjects in mutual dependency<br /><ul><li>Businesses reliant on gat...
Individuals dependent on ‘free’ services built on this data gathering</li></li></ul><li>Behavioural advertising<br />Epito...
 Tendency towards secrecy
‘Sidestepping’ consent</li></li></ul><li>Collaborative Consent<br />Two key aspects<br /><ul><li>Treats consent not as a d...
 Looks at consent as a two-way process – a dialogue</li></li></ul><li>Phorm<br />An extreme level of behavioural targettin...
Works at the ISP level
Legally challenged in a number of ways</li></li></ul><li>Phorm and Consent<br />Many of the problems of Phorm could have b...
Data Protection
Fraud , defamation, passing off, trademark infringement
consent needed from the websites!</li></li></ul><li>Phorm and Privacy<br />Phorm believed their ‘UID’ system meant that th...
The Fall of Phorm<br />Phorm failed for many reasons<br /><ul><li>Attacks from rights groups
Secret trials!
Perceived as ‘anti-privacy’
Abandoned by business allies
Challenges from Europe
Investigations from the OFT, apComms</li></li></ul><li>The Fall of Phorm<br />Another way to look at it<br /><ul><li>An im...
Phorm took, but didn’t give
Not the Google model
More like Facebook’s Beacon – which suffered the same fate</li></li></ul><li>Lessons from Phorm<br />Keeping the balance i...
That means that, one way or another, you need consent
That consent must be meaningful, and understood, not just strictly legal</li></li></ul><li>‘Real’ vs ‘Legal’ consent<br />...
Consent on the internet<br />Currently mostly superficial<br /><ul><li>Unread terms and conditions
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Collaborative Consent

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Collaborative Consent

  1. 1. Collaborative Consent<br />Harnessing the strengths of the Internet<br /> for consent in the online environment<br />
  2. 2. The symbiosis in the Web<br />Data gatherers and data subjects in mutual dependency<br /><ul><li>Businesses reliant on gathering and using personal data
  3. 3. Individuals dependent on ‘free’ services built on this data gathering</li></li></ul><li>Behavioural advertising<br />Epitomises these trends<br /><ul><li>Works by gathering and using personal data
  4. 4. Tendency towards secrecy
  5. 5. ‘Sidestepping’ consent</li></li></ul><li>Collaborative Consent<br />Two key aspects<br /><ul><li>Treats consent not as a discrete, one-off decision, but as a process
  6. 6. Looks at consent as a two-way process – a dialogue</li></li></ul><li>Phorm<br />An extreme level of behavioural targetting<br /><ul><li>Monitors ALL web-browsing
  7. 7. Works at the ISP level
  8. 8. Legally challenged in a number of ways</li></li></ul><li>Phorm and Consent<br />Many of the problems of Phorm could have been addressed by consent<br /><ul><li>Interception of communications (RIPA)
  9. 9. Data Protection
  10. 10. Fraud , defamation, passing off, trademark infringement
  11. 11. consent needed from the websites!</li></li></ul><li>Phorm and Privacy<br />Phorm believed their ‘UID’ system meant that they were not covered by Data Protection<br />BUT: the public perception of privacy is different from the letter of the law, let alone the ‘arguable’ letter of the law<br />
  12. 12. The Fall of Phorm<br />Phorm failed for many reasons<br /><ul><li>Attacks from rights groups
  13. 13. Secret trials!
  14. 14. Perceived as ‘anti-privacy’
  15. 15. Abandoned by business allies
  16. 16. Challenges from Europe
  17. 17. Investigations from the OFT, apComms</li></li></ul><li>The Fall of Phorm<br />Another way to look at it<br /><ul><li>An imbalance in symbiosis
  18. 18. Phorm took, but didn’t give
  19. 19. Not the Google model
  20. 20. More like Facebook’s Beacon – which suffered the same fate</li></li></ul><li>Lessons from Phorm<br />Keeping the balance is crucial<br />You must keep the public on your side<br /><ul><li>People don’t like being taken advantage of
  21. 21. That means that, one way or another, you need consent
  22. 22. That consent must be meaningful, and understood, not just strictly legal</li></li></ul><li>‘Real’ vs ‘Legal’ consent<br />Consent is not just a legal issue…<br /> …it is an issue of autonomy<br />
  23. 23. Consent on the internet<br />Currently mostly superficial<br /><ul><li>Unread terms and conditions
  24. 24. Scrolled-through, unread ‘clickwrap’
  25. 25. Browsed-through, unnoticed ‘browse-wrap’
  26. 26. ‘One off’ consent – gained when you first sign up
  27. 27. ‘Stretched’ consent from service to service</li></li></ul><li>When might consent not be required?<br /><ul><li>When it’s ‘reasonable’ to assume that consent would be granted – but what is ‘reasonable’?
  28. 28. Obligations – legal or international
  29. 29. Where there is an overwhelming societal need or benefit
  30. 30. Is there a ‘need’ for a profitable internet business sector?</li></li></ul><li>Opt-in or Opt-out?<br /><ul><li>Opt-out only when consent can generally be assumed
  31. 31. Where there is any doubt, the rights of the individual should get the benefit of that doubt
  32. 32. Behavioural trackers/advertisers generally use ‘opt-out’…..</li></li></ul><li>Informed consent<br /><ul><li>Does it just mean that information has to be given, or
  33. 33. Does it mean that an ‘informed decision’ needs to be enabled?
  34. 34. Lessons from medical law – Harvey Teff’s ‘collaborative autonomy’.</li></li></ul><li>‘Collaborative consent’<br /><ul><li>The internet lends itself to communication and collaboration
  35. 35. The internet is a communications medium
  36. 36. The internet supplies information
  37. 37. The internet works continuously in real time
  38. 38. Consentprocesses should take advantage of all of this</li></li></ul><li>‘Collaborative consent’<br /><ul><li>Contracts, T&C, EULAs in plain language
  39. 39. Then, turn consent into a communicative collaboration
  40. 40. Data gatherers provide information
  41. 41. Alerts when data is gathered
  42. 42. Alerts when things change
  43. 43. All in real time, providing options to change, revoke, pause, control</li></li></ul><li>When things are important<br />They can be pointed out!<br />
  44. 44. ‘Collaborative consent’<br /><ul><li>Some of this is happening
  45. 45. Google dashboard
  46. 46. Google Ads Preferences
  47. 47. Current systems are hard to find, very much ‘opt-out’</li></li></ul><li>Consent through rights<br />The features of collaborative consent should be seen as rights:<br /><ul><li>Rights to be informed
  48. 48. Rights to be consulted
  49. 49. Rights to withdraw or revoke consent
  50. 50. Rights to choose</li></li></ul><li>The power of consent<br />When a provider needs to get consent, they need to convince a user that they will benefit…<br />….so they need to ensure that there is a benefit to convince the user of, and will build business models accordingly<br />
  51. 51. A future for behavioural tracking?<br /><ul><li>As a method of ‘self profiling’?
  52. 52. For programming ‘intelligent agents’?</li></ul>Perhaps no future – but if there is a future, it should be on the customers’ terms.<br />
  53. 53. Consent in the future<br /><ul><li>A difficult issue to grapple with – but one that must be engaged.
  54. 54. Superficial consent is scarcely better than no consent at all
  55. 55. Making consent a collaborative process could be a useful first step</li></ul>Paul Bernal – p.a.bernal@lse.ac.uk<br />

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