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Spiritual, Health, and Wellness Center Acupressure Slideshow

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A slide show describing the basics of Acupressure

A slide show describing the basics of Acupressure


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  • Hello. My name is Kay Lowell and I am a Holistic Health Educator and practitioner. I teach people to use safe, natural, and non-invasive techniques that help to reduce stress, increase immune system functioning, and increase sense of well-being. In this brief lesson, we will be talking about Acupressure. I’ll be explaining to you what it is, what it can do for you, and we will be doing a brief mini facial acupressure session, in which you can participate at the same time I am demonstrating this technique.
  • First a thank you to Patty Vancil for giving me the opportunity to learn new skills and go outside of my comfort zone. She is helping me make this MY Best Year Ever.And to MelodieLicht for all of her patience and her giving spirit. For all of her time that she has spent helping me by video tapping these presentations and teaching me how to do this for myself.Thank you, ladies.
  • Some of you may have heard about Acupressure. It’s just like acupuncture, but without the use of needles. Acupressure is an ancient form of traditional Chinese medicine using the fingers to skillfully press key points, which stimulate the body’s natural self-curative abilities. Stimulating these points releases endorphins, which are neurochemicals that relieve pain, so pain is blocked.
  • Some of you may have heard about Acupressure. It’s just like acupuncture, but without the use of needles. Acupressure is an ancient form of traditional Chinese medicine using the fingers to skillfully press key points, which stimulate the body’s natural self-curative abilities. Stimulating these points releases endorphins, which are neurochemicals that relieve pain, so pain is blocked.
  • Acupressure is a safe and gentle alternative and complementary therapy used to relieve symptoms from many common conditions, such as pain relief, nausea, vomiting, additions, asthma, constipation, diarrhea, headaches, fibromyalgia, painful menses, allergies, high blood pressure, anxiety, depression, and insomnia.A skilled practitioner simply uses their thumbs and fingers to exert pressure to specific body points.
  • Acupressure is a safe and gentle alternative and complementary therapy used to relieve symptoms from many common conditions, such as pain relief, nausea, vomiting, additions, asthma, constipation, diarrhea, headaches, fibromyalgia, painful menses, allergies, high blood pressure, anxiety, depression, and insomnia.A skilled practitioner simply uses their thumbs and fingers to exert pressure to specific body points.
  • Because Traditional Chinese Medicine’s philosophy is one where dis-ease is caused by an energy imbalance, the purpose of acupressure is to maintain and restore the balance between the body, mind, and spirit.
  • As I mentioned before, Acupressure has been shown to be effective for many conditions, such as common colds, insomnia, painful menses, minor headaches, leg cramps, joints and muscle aches, arthritis, and stiff neck, nasal bleeding, asthma, and mild nausea.
  • As I mentioned before, Acupressure has been shown to be effective for many conditions, such as common colds, insomnia, painful menses, minor headaches, leg cramps, joints and muscle aches, arthritis, and stiff neck, nasal bleeding, asthma, and mild nausea.
  • Acupressure has been around for quite some time. In fact, it has been practiced as a healing art for more than 5,000 years. Practitioners charged for their services only when a patient was healthy. When the patient became ill, practitioners worked to restore health and only accepted payment when health was restored.
  • Acupressure has been around for quite some time. In fact, it has been practiced as a healing art for more than 5,000 years. Practitioners charged for their services only when a patient was healthy. When the patient became ill, practitioners worked to restore health and only accepted payment when health was restored.
  • Acupressure has been around for quite some time. In fact, it has been practiced as a healing art for more than 5,000 years. Practitioners charged for their services only when a patient was healthy. When the patient became ill, practitioners worked to restore health and only accepted payment when health was restored.
  • There are three foundational elements of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The first is the concept of chi, or qi. Traditional Chinese Medicine holds the belief that chi, or qi, is our life essence and is a vital force in maintaining and nurturing our bodies, minds, and spirits. Chi is the source of life, inspiration, and action.The second element to Traditional Chinese Medicine is the concept of Yin and Yang. This theory is rooted in the idea of two opposing, yet complementary, forces that shape the world and all life, and it is central to Traditional Chinese Medicine. Yin and Yang is used to describe the cyclical nature of energy, and it is sometimes viewed as feminine or masculine. Yin and Yang influence all areas of life, they transform into each other, and you cannot have one without the other. The contrasting dot within represents the contrasting elements of the other contained within.The third element of Traditional Chinese Medicine is the use of the Five Element Theory.
  • There are three foundational elements of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The first is the concept of chi, or qi. Traditional Chinese Medicine holds the belief that chi, or qi, is our life essence and is a vital force in maintaining and nurturing our bodies, minds, and spirits. Chi is the source of life, inspiration, and action.The second element to Traditional Chinese Medicine is the concept of Yin and Yang. This theory is rooted in the idea of two opposing, yet complementary, forces that shape the world and all life, and it is central to Traditional Chinese Medicine. Yin and Yang is used to describe the cyclical nature of energy, and it is sometimes viewed as feminine or masculine. Yin and Yang influence all areas of life, they transform into each other, and you cannot have one without the other. The contrasting dot within represents the contrasting elements of the other contained within.The third element of Traditional Chinese Medicine is the use of the Five Element Theory.
  • There are three foundational elements of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The first is the concept of chi, or qi. Traditional Chinese Medicine holds the belief that chi, or qi, is our life essence and is a vital force in maintaining and nurturing our bodies, minds, and spirits. Chi is the source of life, inspiration, and action.The second element to Traditional Chinese Medicine is the concept of Yin and Yang. This theory is rooted in the idea of two opposing, yet complementary, forces that shape the world and all life, and it is central to Traditional Chinese Medicine. Yin and Yang is used to describe the cyclical nature of energy, and it is sometimes viewed as feminine or masculine. Yin and Yang influence all areas of life, they transform into each other, and you cannot have one without the other. The contrasting dot within represents the contrasting elements of the other contained within.The third element of Traditional Chinese Medicine is the use of the Five Element Theory.
  • The Five Elements are aspects of qi, or energy. These are fire, earth, metal water, and wood. Health is a harmonious balance of all the elements. The energy of the elements ebbs and flows in daily and seasonal cycles. These elements correspond to particular organs and tissues in the body, and they are the building blocks of the human body and all matter.For example, let’s look at the wood element. Wood governs the Liver and gallbladder meridians. For people who have a healthy Wood element, they are decisive, and they have clear goals and visions.When there is an imbalance, people can be indecisive, stuck in life, unable to express anger, possible workaholics, and they may have digestive problems. If the liver energy is imbalanced, hot and spicy foods may irritate and upset the digestive tract, and sour and bitter foods should be ingested to balance the energy. Some common signs of a Wood/Liver imbalance are dry or brittle nails, pain just below the ribs, eye problems, migraines, sinus problems, and painful menses.
  • So, when Yin and Yang are in harmony and when the Five Elements are in harmony, there is balance and good health.
  • In Traditional Chinese Medicine, vital energy is called qi or chi, and it circulates in the body through a system of pathways or channels called meridians. Health is an ongoing process of maintaining balance and harmony in the circulation of qi.The meridian system is an energy distribution network that is also energetic. Qi is like a river flowing toward its ultimate source, the ocean.Meridians represent areas of high qi concentration where the energy is dynamic. Any block to that energy flow will result in an imbalance that is manifested in dis-ease or illness.
  • There are 14 Primary Meridians named for the organ or function they are associated with. Acupressure points are named for their position on the meridians, for example, Heart 7 or Large Intestine 4. The meridians are NOT the same as arteries, veins and capillaries, and they do NOT correspond to any anatomic map in Western medicine.
  • There are 14 Primary Meridians named for the organ or function they are associated with. Acupressure points are named for their position on the meridians, for example, Heart 7 or Large Intestine 4. The meridians are NOT the same as arteries, veins and capillaries, and they do NOT correspond to any anatomic map in Western medicine.
  • There are 14 Primary Meridians named for the organ or function they are associated with. Acupressure points are named for their position on the meridians, for example, Heart 7 or Large Intestine 4. The meridians are NOT the same as arteries, veins and capillaries, and they do NOT correspond to any anatomic map in Western medicine.
  • Symptoms of Chi, or energy, Deficiency, are deficient blood, pale skin, pale tongue, irritability, depression, physical weakness, and burn out.
  • While Acupressure is a safe and non-invasive technique, there are some conditions in which acupressure should be avoided. People who are hemophiliacs, women who are pregnant, people who have recently taken drugs or alcohol, who may have sever psychotic conditions, or have acute cardiovascular disorder should avoid having acupressure.
  • While Acupressure is a safe and non-invasive technique, there are some conditions in which acupressure should be avoided. People who are hemophiliacs, women who are pregnant, people who have recently taken drugs or alcohol, who may have sever psychotic conditions, or have acute cardiovascular disorder should avoid having acupressure.
  • And just a side note, Acupressure can also be used on animals as well as humans.
  • Transcript

    • 1. ACUPRESSURE Presented by Kay H. Lowell, DCT(P)Spiritual, Health, and Wellness Center
    • 2. What It IsAcupressure is an ancient form ofTraditional Chinese Medicine(TCM) using the fingers to presskey points, which stimulate thebodys natural self-curativeabilities.
    • 3. What It IsStimulating these points releasesendorphins, which areneurochemicals that relieve pain,so pain is blocked.
    • 4. What It IsAcupressure is a safe and gentlealternative therapy used to relievesymptoms from many commondisorders.
    • 5. What It IsA skilled practitioner simply usestheir thumbs and fingers(sometimes the elbow, crystals,etc.) to exert pressure to specificbody points, which are located onthe Meridian Energy System Map.
    • 6. Purpose of AcupressureTo restore and maintain thebalance between body, mind andspirit.
    • 7. Effective for the Following Conditions• Common Colds• Insomnia• Painful menses• Minor headaches• Leg cramps
    • 8. Effective for the Following Conditions• Joint and muscle aches• Nasal Bleeding• Asthma• Mild Nausea and/or vomiting and diarrhea
    • 9. HistoryAcupressure has been practiced asa healing art for more than 5,000years.
    • 10. HistoryIt is a part of Traditional ChineseMedicine (TCM) and is rooted inTaoism
    • 11. HistoryPractitioners charged for theirservices only when a patient washealthy. When the patient becameill, practitioners worked to restorehealth and only accepted paymentwhen health was restored.
    • 12. Foundational Elements of TCMChi or Qi
    • 13. Foundational Elements of TCMConcept of Yin and Yang
    • 14. Foundational Elements of TCMThe Five Elements 1.Earth 2.Water 3.Metal 4.Wood 5.Fire
    • 15. TCM View of ChiTCM holds the belief that Chi/Qi isour life essence and is a vital forcein maintaining and nurturing ourbodies, minds, and spirits.
    • 16. TCM View of ChiChi is the source of life, inspiration,and action.
    • 17. Five Main Functions of QiA source of all body activity andmovement
    • 18. Five Main Functions of QiIt warms the body and maintainsnormal body temperature.
    • 19. Five Main Functions of QiIt protects the body from harmfulexternal environmental factors.
    • 20. Five Main Functions of QiIt transforms food and air intoother vital substances.
    • 21. Five Main Functions of QiIt helps hold organs, vessels, andbody tissues in their correct placeso they function properly.
    • 22. TCM and Yin/Yang Theory• Yin-yang theory—the concept of two opposing, yet complementary, forces that shape the world and all life—is central to TCM.• Used to describe the cyclical nature of energy.• Sometimes viewed as Feminine/Masculine, Dark/Light• Influences all areas of life• Cannot have one without the other and are interdependent• Transform into each other• The contrasting dot within represents the contrasting elements of the other contained within.
    • 23. TCM and Yin/Yang TheoryYin-yang theory—the concept oftwo opposing, yet complementary,forces that shape the world and alllife—is central to TCM.
    • 24. TCM and Yin/Yang TheoryUsed to describe the cyclicalnature of energy.
    • 25. TCM and Yin/Yang TheorySometimes viewed asFeminine/Masculine, Dark/Light
    • 26. TCM and Yin/Yang TheoryCannot have one without the otherand are interdependent
    • 27. TCM and Yin/Yang TheoryThe contrasting dot withinrepresents the contrastingelements of the other containedwithin.
    • 28. Theory of Five ElementsTCM also uses the theory ofWu Xing or five elements—fire, earth, metal, water,and wood—to explain howthe body works; theseelements correspond toparticular organs andtissues in the body.
    • 29. When Yin and Yang are in harmonyand when the Five Elements are inharmony, there is balance andgood health.
    • 30. Meridian Energy SystemIn the TCM view, a vital energy or lifeforce called qi or chi circulates in thebody through a system of pathways orchannels called meridians. Health is anongoing process of maintainingbalance and harmony in the circulationof qi.
    • 31. Meridian Energy SystemThe meridian system is an energydistribution network that is alsoenergetic.
    • 32. Meridian Energy SystemQi is like a river flowing toward itsultimate source, the ocean.
    • 33. Meridian Energy SystemMeridians represent areas of highqi concentration where the energyis dynamic.
    • 34. Meridian Energy SystemAny block to that energy flow willresult in an imbalance that ismanifested in dis-ease or illness.
    • 35. Meridian Energy SystemThere are 14 Primary Meridiansnamed for the organ or functionthey are associated with.
    • 36. Meridian Energy SystemAcupressure points are named fortheir position on the meridians, forexample, Heart 7 orLarge Intestine 4
    • 37. Meridian Energy SystemThe meridians are NOT the same asarteries, veins and capillaries, andthey do NOT correspond to anyanatomic map in Westernmedicine.
    • 38. Symptoms of Chi Deficiency• Deficient Blood• Pale skin• Pale tongue• Irritability• Depression• Physical Weakness• Burn out
    • 39. When Not To Have AcupressureWhile Acupressure is a safe andnon-invasive technique, there aresome conditions in whichacupressure should be avoided.
    • 40. When Not To Have AcupressurePeople who are hemophiliacs,women who are pregnant, peoplewho have recently taken drugs oralcohol, who may have severpsychotic conditions, or have acutecardiovascular disorder shouldavoid having acupressure.
    • 41. Acupressure For Animals