2009 1019PlattWastingandClimateChange

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2009 1019PlattWastingandClimateChange

  1. 1. Wasting and Climate Change: The ConnectionsStop Trashingfor Local Self-Reliance Brenda Platt, Institute the Climate presented at the Zero Waste Conference Devens, Massachusetts, October 19, 2009 Brenda Platt Institute for Local Self-Reliance BioCycle West, San Diego April 15th, 2008
  2. 2. Top Ten:Why wasting = climate change? 10. 54% of waste goes to landfills, a top source of methane emissions
  3. 3. Thousands of tons19 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 300,000 50,000 0 6019 6219 6419 6619 6819 7019 7219 7419 7619 7819 8019 8219 8419 8619 88 Wasting Trend in U.S.19 9019 9219 9419 9619 9820 0020 0220 0420 06
  4. 4. Top Ten:Why wasting = climate change? 10. 54% of waste is landfilled 9. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas
  5. 5. Landfill greenhouse gas emissions, % of total All Other Landfill Methane 98.2% Emissions 1.8%Total 2005 = 7,260 megatons CO2 equiv.
  6. 6. The global warming potential conceptCO2Methane - 100 year time horizon, 21 times more potent than CO2Methane - 20 yrs, 72times more potent
  7. 7. Landfill greenhouse gas emissions, % of total, 20 yr time horizon All Other 94.8% Landfill Methane Emissions 5.2%Total 2005 = 8,754 megatons CO2 equiv.
  8. 8. Disposal sector emissions, 8.1% oftotal, 20 yr horizon Landfill All Other 5.2% 91.9% Municipal Waste Combustion 0.2% Wastewater Trtmt 1.1% Manure Mgt 1.6%
  9. 9. Top Ten:Why wasting = climate change? 10. Landfills are a top source of methane 9. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas 8. Incinerators are bad for the climate
  10. 10. Waste incinerators are NOT good for the climate 3,500 3,000lbs CO2 emissions/megawatt-hour 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 - Incinerator Coal Fired Oil Fired Natural Gas Fired
  11. 11. Top Ten:Why wasting = climate change? 10. Landfills are a top source of methane 9. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas 8. Incinerators are bad for the climate 7. Incinerators require wasting
  12. 12. Incinerators require waste andwasting
  13. 13. Top Ten:Why wasting = climate change? 10. Landfills are a top source of methane 9. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas 8. Incineration is bad for the climate 7. Incineration requires wasting 6. Trash is not renewable
  14. 14. The WastebergFor every ton ofmunicipal trash, 71tons of waste areproduced duringmanufacturing, mining,oil and gasexploration,agriculture, and coalcombustion.
  15. 15. Upstream = 71 x MSW Waste
  16. 16. Waste of Energy (WOE) 3 to 5 times more energy can be saved by recycling Burning materials for their Btu value is a waste of resources
  17. 17. Top Ten:Why wasting = climate change? 5. Biogenic emissions too often overlooked
  18. 18. Biogenic emissions are notclimate neutralX X X X XX X X
  19. 19. Top Ten:Why wasting = climate change? 5. Biogenic emissions too often overlooked 4. Pay as you throw not widespread
  20. 20. Unit-based Pricing Sends a Clear Message Worcester, MA San Francisco, CA Population 173,000 Population 775,000Unit based pricing is just a different way of paying for waste Source: Kristen Brown, Green Waste Solutions, www.thewastesolution.com
  21. 21. Worcester, MA: PAYT Results 55,000 50,000 45,000 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 19 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 20 01 02 03 04 05 06 86 00 Trash Tons Collected Per Year Recycling Tons Collected Per Year Source: Kristen Brown, Green Waste Solutions, www.thewastesolution.com
  22. 22. Overall Waste Generation Decrease 20+%Source: Kristen Brown, Green Waste Solutions, www.thewastesolution.com
  23. 23. Top Ten:Why wasting = climate change? 5. Biogenic emissions too often overlooked 4. Pay as you throw not widespread 3. Competes with expanding composting and anaerobic digestion systems
  24. 24. Organics Diversion: Core ClimateProtection Strategy  Prevents landfill methane emissions  Stores carbon  Improves soil’s ability to store carbon  Substitutes for energy-intensive fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides  Improves plant growth, and thus carbon sequestration  Reduces energy use for irrigation  Anaerobic digestion offsets fossil fuel consumption
  25. 25. U.S. municipal waste disposed Textiles Paper and 6% Glass paperboard 6% 22% Metals 8% Other materials Wood 8% 8% Yard trimmings 7% Plastics 17%169.2 million tons in 2007 Food scraps 18%Source: US EPA, 2007 data (http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/muncpl/msw99.htm)
  26. 26. Top Ten:Why wasting = climate change? 5. Biogenic emissions too often overlooked 4. Pay as you throw not widespread 3. Competes with expanding composting and anaerobic digestion systems 2. Unchecked consumption
  27. 27. U.S. huge contributor  4.6% of global population  Consume one-third of Earth’s timber and paper  Generate 22% of global CO2 emissions  Produce 30% of world’s waste
  28. 28. Sectors impacted by wasting, % oftotal, 20 yr horizon All Other 61.8% Disposal sector 8.1% Synthetic Fertilizers 1.1% Truck Industrial sector Transportation 24.6% 4.4%
  29. 29. Single use has got to go
  30. 30. Resource ConservationHierarchy Most Preferable Avoid Reduce Reuse Recycle Compost Treat Dispose Least Preferable
  31. 31. Top Ten:Why wasting = climate change? 5. Biogenic emissions too often overlooked 4. Pay as you throw not widespread 3. Competes with expanding composting and anaerobic digestion systems 2. Unchecked consumption 1. Prevents real zero waste planning
  32. 32. 1,000 Tons Per Year19 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 300,000 50,000 0 6019 6319 6619 6919 7219 7519 7819 8119 8419 8719 9019 9319 96 Zero Waste Path19 9920 0220 0520 0820 1120 1420 1720 2020 2320 2620 29
  33. 33. Aiming for zero waste is key GHG abatement strategyAbatement Megatons % of AbatementStrategy CO2 eq. Needed in 2030 to Return to 1990Reducing wastevia prevention, reuse,recycling, composting 406 11.6%Lighting 240 6.9%Vehicle Efficiency 195 5.6%Lower Carbon Fuels 100 2.9%Forest Management 110 3.1%Carbon Capture Storage 95 2.7%Wind 120 3.4%Nuclear 70 2.0%Source: ILSR, GAIA, and Eco-Cycle, Stop Trashing the Climate (2008), and McKinsey Company, Reducing U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions: How Much and at What Cost? (2007)
  34. 34. Zero waste path: less coal plants By significantly reducing waste disposal, the U.S. can take the equivalent of 21% of its coal-fired power plants off the grid by 2030.
  35. 35. Composting Recycling Collection System Designed For High Diversion Recycled Paper Food Scraps 21% 20% Yard Trimmings 5%Glass and Plastic BottlesAluminum and Steel Cans 5% Compostable Paper 10% Construction and Demolition Waste 25% Other 15% Courtesy of City of San Francisco
  36. 36. Easy to Understand ProgramCourtesy of City of San Francisco
  37. 37. Designed for Easy Participation Labeled LidsKitchen Pail Wheeled CartCourtesy of City of San Francisco
  38. 38. Recology’s Jepsen Prairie Organics Regional Composting FacilityCourtesy of City of San Francisco
  39. 39. Toronto
  40. 40. Don’t Waste! Starve a Landfill Feed the soil Conserve resources Protect the climate Create jobs Sustain new businesses
  41. 41. Job Creation: Reclamation vs. Disposal Type of Operation Jobs/ 10,000 TPY Computer Reuse 296 Textile Reclamation 85 Misc. Durables Reuse 62 Wooden Pallet Repair 28 Recycling-Based Manufacturers 25 Conventional MRFs 10 Composting 4 Disposal Facilities 1MRF = materials recovery facility Institute for Local Self-RelianceTPY = tons per year
  42. 42. Composting = Local Organics do not ship well Composting is small-scale Compost products are used locally Jobs are local Dollars circulate within local economies Local = good for local economies Institute for Local Self-Reliance
  43. 43. A Call to Action! Implement zero waste targets and plans. Stop disposing organic materials – COMPOST! Pursue recycling-based local economic development. Make manufacturers responsible for their products. Regulate single-use plastics. Reduce junk mail. Buy recycled. Institute pay-as-you-throw trash fees.
  44. 44. Contact www.stoptrashingtheclimate.org www.ilsr.org bplatt@ilsr.org Brenda Platt 202-898-1610 x230

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