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Getting Connected: Configuring Internet Access & Perimeter Security
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Getting Connected: Configuring Internet Access & Perimeter Security

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Getting Connected: Configuring Internet Access & Perimeter Security Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Break Out Session 3 Internet Connectivity And Perimeter Security PRESENTED BY: Don West Onramp Access
  • 2. Internet Connection types for Business class Connectivity
    • ISDN
    • DSL
    • Wireless/Satellite
    • Cable
    • T1, T3
    • Ethernet
    • Fiber
  • 3. ISDN Integrate Service Digital Network
    • Pros:
    • Inexpensive and very versatile
    • Almost everyone can get it
    • Can be used as data and voice
    • Cons:
    • Only 128Kbps
    • When receiving voice call, only 64K
    • Can be bonded for (somewhat)higher speed
  • 4. DSL Digital Subscriber Line
    • Pros:
    • Readily available for many businesses
    • Low cost
    • Relatively inexpensive
    • Some providers have business class w/SLA
    • Cons:
    • NOT available(reliably) for some businesses
    • Poor response time during outages
    • Difficult to support
  • 5. Wireless
    • Pros:
    • Available even in very small communities
    • Relatively inexpensive
    • Cons:
    • Still developing technology
    • Weather related issues
    • Small rural areas will have hard time providing support quickly
    • Latency can be unacceptable
  • 6. Cable service
    • Pros:
    • Very fast for the money
    • Large providers have business class service w/SLA
    • Support
    • Already have a service infrastructure to provide service to end user location
    • Cons:
    • More suceptible(compared to T1/DS3/Ethernet/Fiber) to outages
    • Will have equipment owned by the cable provider
    • Support
  • 7. T1/DS3
    • Pros:
    • Widely available
    • Because it is provided by the ILEC, Service is guaranteed
    • Good SLA
    • ISP can "own" the customer
    • Customer can provide their own equipment
    • Can be Point-to-Point for private service
    • Cons:
    • Expensive
    • ILEC infrastructure
    • T1 routers are more expensive
    • Political issues involved between the CLEC and ILEC
  • 8. Ethernet
    • Pros:
    • FAST, equipment is readily available
    • Very reliable
    • SLA
    • Duplexing allows synchronous ingress/egress speeds
    • Cons:
    • Distance limitation without signal repeaters or conversion is limited to 100M's
    • costly
    • ILEC can be involved
  • 9. Fiber
    • Pros:
    • Very fast with little loss
    • If backed by good company, it has excellent SLA and service
    • Because only large companies can provide service, it is a reliable service
    • Flexibility of types of traffic than can travel over fiber
    • Typically a very redundant/self-healing network
    • Cons:
    • Young technology
    • Not readily available
    • Costly
    • Could be extended outages
    • Equipment is expensive and difficult to configure/support
  • 10. Perimeter Security
  • 11.
    • If you do not have it, you WILL be compromised(it is only a matter of time)
    • Very complex dynamic issue
    • Requires constant monitoring
    • Costly for business when an issue occurs
    • Costly to implement and support
    • Better in layers
    • Requires expert personnel/support
    • Host or Software based
  • 12. Questions?
  • 13.