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SharePoint and Knowledge Management: enemies or best friends?
 

SharePoint and Knowledge Management: enemies or best friends?

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Knowledge societies are considered highest and most advanced of all. What about knowledge organizations? Come to this session to learn about knowledge management best practices from Microsoft Corp, ...

Knowledge societies are considered highest and most advanced of all. What about knowledge organizations? Come to this session to learn about knowledge management best practices from Microsoft Corp, but also see real life examples of SharePoint-based solutions which can be implemented in your organizations to foster knowledge sharing, discover new market opportunities and reduce cost.

Marko Pršić

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  • This is the latest of our analytics we are developing that is addressing the holy grail of KM - IP ROI. Leveraging a new functionality of Microsoft SQL 2012, called semantic search, we are able to match documents and provide a similarity score.

SharePoint and Knowledge Management: enemies or best friends? SharePoint and Knowledge Management: enemies or best friends? Presentation Transcript

  • SharePoint and Knowledge Management: enemies or best friends? MARKO PRŠIĆ MICROSOFT CONSULTING SERVICES SHAREPOINT AND PROJECT CONFERENCE ADRIATICS 2013 ZAGREB, NOVEMBER 27-28 2013
  • sponsors
  • AGENDA • Why knowledge management (KM) • Information vs. Knowledge • Knowledge in business context • Aspects of KM • Organization • Process • Technology • LKMS (Learning and Knowledge Management System) • Conclusion
  • Information vs. Knowledge • Information • Organized, processed, communicated data • Can be stored • A prerequisite for knowledge • Typical SharePoint implementations • information management & collaboration Information overload
  • Information vs. Knowledge • Knowledge • Expertize and skills gained through education as well as personal experience • Mostly personal • Overload? Never enough • Implicit / tacit knowledge (know-how) • cannot be formalized • Explicit knowledge (know-what) • can be stored
  • Information vs. Knowledge • Knowledge in business context • Most important asset of modern companies • A base for innovation and profitability • Most valuable resource • acquiring knowledge is costly and takes time • loss of knowledge costs even more
  • Information vs. Knowledge • Knowledge in business context • MAKE study (Most Admired Knowledge Enterprises): total Return to Shareholders (TRS) nearly three times the average Fortune 500 company • Gartner: annual productivity improvement 7-30% • Drake Beam Morin: 50% reduction in knowledge worker turnover • Most successful companies invest 5-10% of revenue in KM
  • Example: Selling MS products
  • Example: Selling MS products • Know-what: • Detailed information about each product (features, prices, compatibility…) • Know-how: • Best use cases • Network of experts (know-who) “In our world of innovation acceleration you are as good as your trusted network!”
  • Knowledge management (KM) • Continuous process of capturing, developing, sharing, and effectively using a body of knowledge • How • Organization • Process • Technology Proce sses Organ ization Techn ology KM
  • Knowledge management (KM) Organization • Organizational initiative/program • Program goals aligned with one or more strategic priorities
  • Example: Microsoft Services organization 75% 20,000+ Microsoft 6,000+ of Fortune 1,000 Companies served Services employees worldwide Consultants & Architects 191 countries LARGEST Division 46 languages within Microsoft 5,000+ Support Professionals
  • Example: Microsoft Services organization • KM as organizational program with following goals: $ Reduced delivery time Effective knowledge retention Predictable quality & effort Increased business performance Reduced ramp time for new in role Just-in time readiness Effective leverage of innovation
  • Knowledge management (KM) Organization • Depends highly on internal culture http://www.brandingbusiness.com/2011/0 9/culture-eats-strategy-for-breakfast/ • Drive cultural changes Recognition Social connection Reputation
  • Example: Microsoft Services organization • Changing culture to support KM:
  • Knowledge management (KM) Process Understand your learning model • On the job learning (70%) • • • • Collaborate - gaining knowledge through regular business activities Side assignments/projects (leading a community) Evaluating knowledge assets of other people Mentoring other people • From others (20%) • • • • Searching for existing knowledge or experts Learning from a mentor Participating in communities of practice Networking, feedback, social • Training (10%) • Trainings and conferences • Distance learning (AV conferences, recordings, e-Learning seminars) Lombardo and Eichinger model
  • Example: Services Campus platform Network of people & experts Improving IP Quality Capturing knowledge Customer Delivery (Projects) Campus: platform for searching expertize, forming virtual Approved communities, evaluating& IP guidance knowledge Internal Processes drive and evolve Organizational IP into Community-based & Organizational Knowledge and Personal Knowledge Team-based collaboration MSEngage: platform for project Knowledge collaboration and from knowledge codification projects Engagement-based collaboration Harvesting & Approving IP
  • Example: Services Campus platform On the job learning (70%): Project collaboration • • • • official project information repository context-aware: customer, industry, technology, methodology support for just-in-time knowledge: templates, LL, similar projects knowledge nomination
  • Example: Services Campus platform On the job learning (70%): Knowledge sharing • • • Knowledge sharing Mata-data Knowledge evaluation
  • Example: Services Campus platform On the job learning (70%): Knowledge evaluation (relevancy)
  • Example: Services Campus platform On the job learning (70%): Knowledge reuse measure IP re-use measure using Microsoft Semantic SQL This is the ultimate IP reuse measure - factual calculation of IP ROI!
  • Example: Services Campus platform Learning from others (20%): Collaborative knowledge base (My IP)
  • SHAREPOINT AND PROJECT CONFERENCE ADRIATICS 2013 ZAGREB, NOVEMBER 27-28 2013
  • Example: Services Campus platform Learning from others (20%): Finding explicit or tacit knowledge
  • Example: Services Campus platform Learning from others (20%): Finding explicit or tacit knowledge
  • Example: Services Campus platform Formal training (10%): Learning management subsystem Catalog of e-Learning courses, on premise events (conferences) and learning programs:
  • Knowledge management (KM) Technology capabilities • Develop capabilities to support learning process Learning model Activities Technical capabilities On the job learning • Gaining knowledge through regular business activities Side assignments: community activities, side projects etc. Evaluating knowledge assets of other people Mentoring other people • • Knowledge nomination and evaluation (workflow) Mentoring process support Searching for existing explicit or tacit knowledge Learning from a mentor Participating in virtual communities Providing feedback, social networking • Knowledge base, expert pools • • • Mentoring process support Virtual communities Collaborative knowledge base, BSN On-site conferences and trainings Distance learning (AV conferences, recordings, e-Learning seminars) • • Learning record AV/conferencing system, recordings repository, e-Learning support • • • Learning from others • • • • Formal training • • • • Basic workgroup collaboration, project portals Virtual communities
  • LKMS • Example of SharePoint-based Learning and Knowledge Management System (LKMS) • Realized as SharePoint 2013 solution (not an “App” – yet!) • Aggregated best practice of Microsoft Corp. • Leveraging existing SharePoint functionality (collaboration, search, WF...) • Build specific capabilities for knowledge management and learning • Applicable to enterprise customers in “Adriatics” region (not Microsoft!)
  • LKMS HR Assign ments & Programs Knowledge catalog Virtual communities SMEs Knowledge base (documents, templates, presentations, articles, AV conferences…) Employees
  • LKMS Learning and knowledge management - advanced E-Learning Classroom learning management Expertize, virtual commun. Virtual classroom Knowledge verification Learning and knowledge management - basic Web portal and notifications Knowledge base People and group management Knowledge catalog (search) Education assignments Reporting subsystem Platform Collaboration Document Management Search Unified Communications RDBMS
  • LKMS
  • CONCLUSION • SharePoint and Knowledge Management SharePoint plain functionality SharePoint for KM • Information management • Project collaboration • Search • Separate KM workspace • Support for managing explicit knowledge • Knowledge nomination and evaluation • Metadata management • Knowledge maturity (relevance) • Knowledge improvement (feedback) • Knowledge catalog (search) • Support for managing tacit knowledge • Communities of practice • Expert nomination and evaluation • Support for just-in-time learning • Instant messaging, AV conferences, e-Learning • Learning programs
  • questions? MARKO.PRSIC@MICROSOFT.COM
  • thank you. SHAREPOINT AND PROJECT CONFERENCE ADRIATICS 2013 ZAGREB, NOVEMBER 27-28 2013