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    Source 1 -_my_hero_ussain_bolt_-_to_annotate Source 1 -_my_hero_ussain_bolt_-_to_annotate Document Transcript

    • English DepartmentKS4Unit 1: Non-FictionMy hero: Usain Bolt by IanThomsonIn an island riven by gang warfare and poverty, Bolt will help to rallyJamaicans to the black, gold and green of the national flagWas ever a sprint champion better named? Lightning bolt. Usain St Leo Bolt: thefastest man on planet Earth. Before he triumphed with a gold medal in 2008, onlytrack diehards had heard of him. Now the 25-year-old Jamaican is famousworldwide. In spite of his fame he remains heroically down to earth and relaxed. Heloves reggae and "lyrically active" (verbally inventive) Jamaican dancehall DJs. Hestands at 6ft 5ins. He has survived a car crash. Yet he will not consider himself alegend unless he rules in London next week, as he did in Beijing four years ago.Jamaica loves a hero, and no Jamaican is more heroic than Bolt. Born in 1986 onthe islands rural north coast, he grew up poor. His parents ran a grocery storeselling bottles of rum and cigarettes. By the age of 12, Bolt was the schools fastest100m sprinter; now he is a three-time Olympic gold medallist. All kinds of Jamaicanswill be rooting for him next week at the starting blocks. Black, white, brown andyellow; vested interests, professionals, businesspeople; all will be joined in optimismabout their sporting hero and Jamaicas own future.In an island riven by gang warfare and poverty, Bolt will help to rally Jamaicans tothe black, gold and green of the national flag. As every Jamaican knows, the greenis symbolic of hoped-for rebirth and the black a recognition of continental Africa. Foryears, Jamaicas African slave heritage was the dark area of self-denial in thenational psyche. (To a degree, it still is.) Bolt gives an immense sense of pride notonly to Jamaicans living in Jamaica, but to diaspora Jamaicans in the United Statesand the UK. This August, as Jamaica prepares to celebrate 50 years ofindependence from Britain, Usain Bolt will be a reason to jump (even sprint) for joy.An estimated 1 million people have applied for tickets to watch him run in a race thatwill be over in less than 10 seconds. To Di World! Source 1