Faster than a_-_lesson_slides[1]
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Faster than a_-_lesson_slides[1]

on

  • 579 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
579
Views on SlideShare
579
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
6
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Faster than a_-_lesson_slides[1] Faster than a_-_lesson_slides[1] Document Transcript

  • Language Unit 1Reading Non-Fiction
  • In this unit, you need to be able toAO3,iRead and understand texts, selecting materialappropriate to purpose, collating from different sourcesand making comparisons and cross-references asappropriate.AO3,iiiExplain and evaluate how writers use linguistic,grammatical, structural and presentational features toachieve effects and engage and influence the reader,supporting their comments with detailed textualreferences. Assessment Objectives
  • Text Type? Audience? Purpose?First Steps - TAP
  • What? Why?Who? How? First Steps - WWWH
  • Questions: Q 1. What do you learn..? Content Writers viewpoint and attitudes Q 2. Explain the effectiveness of presentation..? Headline and picture Link to the text/TAP Q 3. Explain the thoughts and feelings of..? Explain which parts of... you find tense and exciting? Inference Finding best quotations Q 4. Compare the different ways language is used... Item 3 and Item 1/2 (you choose) Similarities and differences Effects of word choice Question Types - Higher Specific
  • What do you know? Felix Baumgartner What associations do you have?
  • Image Prompts (Hyperlink to online Video of fall)
  • Source 1: =? =? Source 1
  • Source 1: Felix Baumgartners skydive pales in comparison with the moon landings The Austrians jump used the images of space exploration but this pseudo astronaut achieved only a daredevil publicity stunt by Jonathon Jones. When I was four and five and six years old we watched the moon landings on TV then waited nervously for the splashdown and the astronauts release from their seared capsule with its orange flotation bags bobbing on a white and blue sea. In the same way millions of people watched Felix Baumgartners astonishing fall through the empty sky on YouTube. In his protective suit the Austrian daredevil looked for all the world like some Apollo astronaut of the 1960s. But did this daring deed truly recreate the images of the space age, or only an empty pastiche of them? History always repeats itself, said Hegel. He forgot to add, said Marx – the first time as tragedy, the second as farce. Not that Baumgartners dive was farce. It was heroic, if not foolhardy. In terms of sheer mad bravery it was stupendous. But surely those seductive, glorious, beautiful images with their evocation of the great moments of space exploration are so appealing because they fill a void in our collective heart, a void of aspiration and the belief in progress that a daredevils leap, however gallant, cannot ever really match. In the end, Baumgartners achievement is just a great stunt, with a commercial sponsor. It is in essence the same as tumbling over Niagara Falls in a barrel. People have always done brave things, and in the early 20th century going over Niagara Falls in a barrel became the leap of choice for publicity-conscious stunt people (first over the top was a woman, in 1901). Yet amazing as such jumps were, did they add to human knowledge and capacity? No – the first powered flight by the Wright brothers, which was much less spectacular, just off the ground in fact, changed the world in a way stunts do not. The images of this leap look like exploration but actually are mere entertainment. The visual similarity between Baumgartners record-breaking publicity stunt and the feats of engineering audacity that took human beings on to the surface of the moon and then, even in the cash-strapped 1970s, built a landable and reusable spacecraft is cruelly deceptive and fully intended by the sponsor. Baumgartners freefall is not the same as the public-funded, state-sponsored efforts of an entire scientific generation that not so long ago sent Neil Armstrong on to the silver dust of the lunar surface. Look closer and the visual image of this 21st century hero is not so 20th century, after all. His helmet has the words Red Bull on it, not a stars and stripes. Indeed, Red Bull logos and inscriptions are all over his space suit. Seeing the earth from Baumgartners helmet is spectacular and sad: wondrous to see this orb Source 1
  • Can you summarise the content? Summary
  • Source 2: =? =? Source 2
  • Source 2: Faster than a speeding bullet: Austrian skydiver leaps into the history books Supersonic skydiver Felix Baumgartner took to the skies on Sunday afternoon in a historic bid that saw him become the first human being to travel faster than the speed of sound in freefall. More than 8 million people watched the 43-year-old Austrian – known as Fearless Felix – jump from a balloon 24 miles above the New Mexico desert and freefall from the edge of space. After a two hour journey up, it took Mr Baumgartner just under ten minutes to land back on Earth, reaching speeds of up to 725mph, breaking the sound barrier at Mach 1.24 and smashing three world records in the process. The records he achieved were: The fastest freefall after reaching a top speed of 834mph (1,342km/h); becoming the first human being to break the sound barrier in freefall; in reaching 128,100ft above Earth, he exceeded the altitude for the highest ever manned balloon flight – the previous record was held by Victor Prather and Malcolm Ross, who made it to 113,720ft in 1961. When he landed in Roswell – famed for its UFO sightings – Mr Baumgartner dropped to his knees and raised his arms in victory. There were tense moments in the control room early in the dive as Mr Baumgartner began to spin laterally out of control, free-falling head-over-heels. Speaking afterwards at a press conference, Mr Baumgartner said: “In that situation, when you spin around, its like hell and you dont know if you can get out of that spin or not.” To the relief of everyone watching, including his mother, Ava, Mr Baumgartner was able to use his considerable skydiving experience and regain control before releasing his parachute. Mr Baumgartner wore a specially designed survival suit, similar to those worn by astronauts, to keep his body intact against the varying atmospheric pressures, with three cameras attached to record his descent. The risks in making such a jump included the possibility of his blood boiling and his organs exploding. Although the jump was thought by many to be a daredevil stunt, Mr Baumgartner’s team were keen to stress its high scientific relevance. Its success will help to inform the development of new ideas for emergency evacuation from airborne vehicles, such as spacecraft, passing through the stratosphere. Baumgartner’s mentor, Joe Kittinger, now in his eighties, was the previous world record holder of the highest freefall jump. He provided the younger man with advice and encouragement during the seven-year build-up to his daring adventure. Mr Kittinger’s was the only voice Baumgartner heard in the control room. “Felix did a great job and it was a great honour to work with this brave guy,” Mr Kittinger said. Mr Baumgartner said in the end all his thoughts were about getting back alive: “When I was standing there on top of the world, you become so humble, you dont think about breaking records. Sometimes you have to go up really high to see how small you are.” Source 2
  • Source 3: =? =? Source 3
  • Source 3: USAIN BOLT – THE FASTEST MAN in the world. Never, ever do I get tired of hearing that. If you lined up a hundred people and asked them who the best basketball player in the world is, the best footballer, or the best cricketer, it is unlikely they would provide the same answer. But ask any of them, ‘Who is the best sprinter in the world?’ and there is only one answer – Usain Bolt. Why? Because that is what it says on the clock. There can be no dispute or argument. The record book say that over 100 metres flat race, the true measure of human speed, I’m the fastest person that ever lived, completing the distance, as I did at the World Championships in Berlin, in 9.58 seconds. It is said that the population of the earth is 6.8 billion and that approximately 107 billion have lived on this planet since man came into being. It doesn’t get any cooler than knowing you are the fastest of them all. I chose to be a sprinter, not only because I was the fastest kid in school, but also because I knew that politics couldn’t interfere. In team sports it can be down to opinion whether you are the best. One coach might think you’re good enough for his team, another might not, or the side could be picked on friendship or family ties. But in athletics you are either the fastest or you aren’t – opinion doesn’t come into it. We had a grass track at the front of Waldensia Primary School, which is still there, exactly as it was, with a two-foot dip at the end of the straight, and when I first raced on it a guy called Ricardo Geddes would beat me. One day the sports coach, Devere Nugent, bet me a lunch that I could beat Ricardo. I like my food, so it was a big incentive. I won, enjoyed a nice meal, and never lost to Ricardo again. Winning that race was my first experience of the thrill of beating your closest rival, and from that day my motto has always been ‘Once I’ve beaten you, you won’t beat me again.’ Source 3
  • 1. What do you learn from the article about Felix Baumgartners skydive? (8 marks) Examiner is looking for evidence that you can cover AT LEAST 2 or 3 of the descriptors in the band WELL. What Question 1 - H
  • 1. What do you learn from the article about Felix Baumgartners skydive? (8 marks) One thing I learn about from the article is that... WHAT + WHY Overall, ... What Question 1 - H
  • 1. What do you learn from the article about Felix Baumgartners skydive? (8 marks) One thing I learn from the article is that... This suggests/shows/reveals... It makes me think... Another thing I learn is... I also find out that... Overall, ... For band 3 and 4 you need to INTERPRET the information. Think about SUMMARISING at the end. What Question 1 - H (Frame)
  • Look at Source 22. Explain how the headline and picture are effective and how they they link to the text? (8 marks) How Question on Presentation - H
  • What? Why? Focus - Headline
  • What? Associations? Impact? Use? Effect? Why? Focus - Headline
  • What? Why? Focus - Pictures
  • Look at Source 22. Explain how the headline and picture are effective and how they they link to the text? (8 marks) Presentation is used in this article in order to... The headline is effective as... WHAT + WHY How Question on Presentation - H
  • Look at Source 22. Explain how the headline and picture are effective and how they they link to the text? (8 marks) Presentation is used in this text in order to... The headline is effective as... For example... This suggests/reveals/makes the reader... The word/s... because... It links to the text as... Perhaps... The picture is effective as... For example... This suggests/reveals/makes the reader... because... It links to the text as... Perhaps... In addition to this, How Question on Presentation - H (Frame)
  • Read Source 33. Explain some of the thoughts and feelings Usain Bolt has about his chosen career? (8 marks) Explain Question on Thoughts/Feelings - H
  • Source 3: USAIN BOLT – THE FASTEST MAN in the world. Never, ever do I get tired of hearing that. If you lined up a hundred people and asked them who the best basketball player in the world is, the best footballer, or the best cricketer, it is unlikely they would provide the same answer. But ask any of them, ‘Who is the best sprinter in the world?’ and there is only one answer – Usain Bolt. Why? Because that is what it says on the clock. There can be no dispute or argument. The record book say that over 100 metres flat race, the true measure of human speed, I’m the fastest person that ever lived, completing the distance, as I did at the World Championships in Berlin, in 9.58 seconds. It is said that the population of the earth is 6.8 billion and that approximately 107 billion have lived on this planet since man came into being. It doesn’t get any cooler than knowing you are the fastest of them all. I chose to be a sprinter, not only because I was the fastest kid in school, but also because I knew that politics couldn’t interfere. In team sports it can be down to opinion whether you are the best. One coach might think you’re good enough for his team, another might not, or the side could be picked on friendship or family ties. But in athletics you are either the fastest or you aren’t – opinion doesn’t come into it. We had a grass track at the front of Waldensia Primary School, which is still there, exactly as it was, with a two-foot dip at the end of the straight, and when I first raced on it a guy called Ricardo Geddes would beat me. One day the sports coach, Devere Nugent, bet me a lunch that I could beat Ricardo. I like my food, so it was a big incentive. I won, enjoyed a nice meal, and never lost to Ricardo again. Winning that race was my first experience of the thrill of beating your closest rival, and from that day my motto has always been ‘Once I’ve beaten you, you won’t beat me again.’ Source 3
  • Regretful Frustrated Subdued Bitter Enthusiastic Intimidated Taken-aback Sympathetic RegretfulGrieved Ashamed Defensive Humble Unhappy SatisfiedRejected Attached Regretful GratifiedIncompetent Passionate UpsetDemoralized HappyDefeated Worried Annoyed Distressed Irritated OverwhelmedExhilarated Contented Fond Meek Let down Ambivalent Resentful Jovial Appreciative Threatened Thoughtful Skill: Vocabulary Focus/Sort
  • After using a quotation... * What does the quotation suggest/show/reveal? * Why? * Do any words within the quotation seem significant? * Why? * What does it make the reader think/feel/understand? * Why? * Does the quotation suggest/show/reveal anything else? * Why? * Why? * Why Stages of Explanation
  • 3. Explain some of the thoughts and feelings Usain Bolt has about his chosen career? (8 marks) To begin with, Usain Bolt ... For example, ... This shows/suggests/reveals... because... The word/phrase... It makes me think that... Perhaps... In addition, he feels... ... Towards the end,... Overall, Usian Bolt gives the impression that... Remember that you need to INFER and INTERPRET for an EXPLAIN question Explain Question on Thoughts/Feelings - H
  • Use Source 3 andeither Source 1 or Source 24. Compare the different ways in which language is used for effect in the two texts. Give some examples and analyse the effects. (16 marks) Compare Question on Language - H
  • The Examiners Checklist(from past mark schemes) alliteration informative anecdotal juxtaposition antithesis metaphorical comparison narrative contrast noun phrases description personal direct address personification direct speech pun discursive markers quotations emotive short/dramatic sentences evocative language simile exclamations technical expert view tension facts and figures/factual understatement figurative varied sentence lengths formality verb use humour vivid language imagery words to reflect emotion Examiners Glossary
  • Language ToolboxCan you identify/comment on: adjectives metaphors adverbs modal verbs alliteration onomatopoeia anecdotes opinions assonance personification comparatives powerful verbs concrete, proper, abstract nouns repetition direct address rhetorical questions discourse markers rhyme emotive language rhythm exaggeration semantic field exclusive pronouns similes facts standard English humour statistics imperatives superlatives inclusive pronouns technical language informal language tense irony triples lists understatement Glossary: Language
  • FFAERTFive FactsFat FiguresAfrican AnecdotesElephants Emotive LanguageRan Rhetorical QuestionsRiot RepetitionToday Triples FFAERRT
  • I FAERRTED!· Imperative - Giving an order/command· Facts/Figures - Numbers· Anecdote - Story to support· Emotive Language - Create emotion· Rhetorical Question - ?· Repetition· Triple - x3 · Know it!· Exaggeration · Find it!· Direct Address - You · Comment on it!· ! Shock Tactics I FAERRTED!
  • Gathering Ideas... Text 1 Text 2 Text 3 Gathering Ideas: Feature Matrix
  • Gathering Ideas... Venn Diagram
  • Same Different· similarly · however· likewise · on the other hand· also · alternatively· just as much as · is different from · unlike· is similar to · yet· in the same way · whereas· are alike in that · by contrast· a similarity between · a difference between the texts is... the texts is ... Comparison
  • Use Source 3 andeither Source 1 or Source 24. Compare the different ways in which language is used for effect in the two texts. Give some examples and analyse the effects. (16 marks) Source 3 and Source 1/2 make very similar/ different use of language in order to... To begin with, Source 3 makes use of ... For example, ... This shows/suggests/reveals... because... The word/phrase... It makes reader think/feel/understand... Perhaps... In comparison/Likewise, Source 1/2 uses... Another technique used by... In the same way/However,... ... Overall, the language of... No matter how GOOD your ANALYSIS is, you CANNOT get a Band 3 if you do not COMPARE! Compare Question on Language - H