People, Technology and Advertising
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People, Technology and Advertising

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A talk I gave about the digital landscape, how the media landscape has changed (thanks to Clay Shirky), how it affects us as people and how we can best deal with it all.

A talk I gave about the digital landscape, how the media landscape has changed (thanks to Clay Shirky), how it affects us as people and how we can best deal with it all.

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  • I want to talk about what we do, why we do it and how you can learn from what we’ve learnt
  • I want to talk about what we do, why we do it and how you can learn from what we’ve learnt
  • We want to share our learnings, and we want want you to take away some of our hard-learnt lessons
  • There are only four periods in the last 500 years where media has changed enough to qualify for the label Revolution.&#xA0; <br /> The first one is the famous one, the printing press. Movable type, oil-based inks, that whole complex of innovations that made printing possible and turned Europe upside-down, starting in the middle of the 1400s.&#xA0; <br /> Then a couple of hundred years ago there was innovation in two way communication. Conversational media, first the telegraph, then the telephone. Slow, text based conversations, then real-time voice based conversations.&#xA0; <br /> Then, about 150 years ago, there was a revolution in recorded media other than print. First photos, then recorded sound, then movies, all encoded onto physical objects.&#xA0; <br /> And finally about 100 years ago, the harnessing of electromagnetic spectrum to send sound and images through the air, radio and television. This is the media landscape as we knew it in the 20th century.&#xA0; <br /> But there is a curious asymmetry here. The media that is good at creating conversations is no good at creating groups. And that&apos;s good at creating groups is no good at creating conversations. If you want to have a conversation in this world, you have it with one other person. If you want to address a group, you get the same message and you give it to everybody in the group. Whether you&apos;re doing that with a broadcasting tower or a printing press. That was the media landscape as we had it in the twentieth century.&#xA0; <br /> Then something changed. This thing that looks like a peacock hit a windscreen&#xA0;is Bill Cheswick&apos;s map of the Internet.&#xA0;He traces the edges of the individual networks&#xA0;and then color codes them.&#xA0; <br /> The Internet is the first medium in history that has native support for groups and conversation at the same time. Where as the phone gave us the one to one pattern. And television, radio, magazines, books, gave us the one to many pattern. The Internet gives us the many to many pattern. For the first time media is natively good at supporting these kinds of conversations. &#xA0;
  • There are only four periods in the last 500 years where media has changed enough to qualify for the label Revolution.&#xA0; <br /> The first one is the famous one, the printing press. Movable type, oil-based inks, that whole complex of innovations that made printing possible and turned Europe upside-down, starting in the middle of the 1400s.&#xA0; <br /> Then a couple of hundred years ago there was innovation in two way communication. Conversational media, first the telegraph, then the telephone. Slow, text based conversations, then real-time voice based conversations.&#xA0; <br /> Then, about 150 years ago, there was a revolution in recorded media other than print. First photos, then recorded sound, then movies, all encoded onto physical objects.&#xA0; <br /> And finally about 100 years ago, the harnessing of electromagnetic spectrum to send sound and images through the air, radio and television. This is the media landscape as we knew it in the 20th century.&#xA0; <br /> But there is a curious asymmetry here. The media that is good at creating conversations is no good at creating groups. And that&apos;s good at creating groups is no good at creating conversations. If you want to have a conversation in this world, you have it with one other person. If you want to address a group, you get the same message and you give it to everybody in the group. Whether you&apos;re doing that with a broadcasting tower or a printing press. That was the media landscape as we had it in the twentieth century.&#xA0; <br /> Then something changed. This thing that looks like a peacock hit a windscreen&#xA0;is Bill Cheswick&apos;s map of the Internet.&#xA0;He traces the edges of the individual networks&#xA0;and then color codes them.&#xA0; <br /> The Internet is the first medium in history that has native support for groups and conversation at the same time. Where as the phone gave us the one to one pattern. And television, radio, magazines, books, gave us the one to many pattern. The Internet gives us the many to many pattern. For the first time media is natively good at supporting these kinds of conversations. &#xA0;
  • There are only four periods in the last 500 years where media has changed enough to qualify for the label Revolution.&#xA0; <br /> The first one is the famous one, the printing press. Movable type, oil-based inks, that whole complex of innovations that made printing possible and turned Europe upside-down, starting in the middle of the 1400s.&#xA0; <br /> Then a couple of hundred years ago there was innovation in two way communication. Conversational media, first the telegraph, then the telephone. Slow, text based conversations, then real-time voice based conversations.&#xA0; <br /> Then, about 150 years ago, there was a revolution in recorded media other than print. First photos, then recorded sound, then movies, all encoded onto physical objects.&#xA0; <br /> And finally about 100 years ago, the harnessing of electromagnetic spectrum to send sound and images through the air, radio and television. This is the media landscape as we knew it in the 20th century.&#xA0; <br /> But there is a curious asymmetry here. The media that is good at creating conversations is no good at creating groups. And that&apos;s good at creating groups is no good at creating conversations. If you want to have a conversation in this world, you have it with one other person. If you want to address a group, you get the same message and you give it to everybody in the group. Whether you&apos;re doing that with a broadcasting tower or a printing press. That was the media landscape as we had it in the twentieth century.&#xA0; <br /> Then something changed. This thing that looks like a peacock hit a windscreen&#xA0;is Bill Cheswick&apos;s map of the Internet.&#xA0;He traces the edges of the individual networks&#xA0;and then color codes them.&#xA0; <br /> The Internet is the first medium in history that has native support for groups and conversation at the same time. Where as the phone gave us the one to one pattern. And television, radio, magazines, books, gave us the one to many pattern. The Internet gives us the many to many pattern. For the first time media is natively good at supporting these kinds of conversations. &#xA0;
  • There are only four periods in the last 500 years where media has changed enough to qualify for the label Revolution.&#xA0; <br /> The first one is the famous one, the printing press. Movable type, oil-based inks, that whole complex of innovations that made printing possible and turned Europe upside-down, starting in the middle of the 1400s.&#xA0; <br /> Then a couple of hundred years ago there was innovation in two way communication. Conversational media, first the telegraph, then the telephone. Slow, text based conversations, then real-time voice based conversations.&#xA0; <br /> Then, about 150 years ago, there was a revolution in recorded media other than print. First photos, then recorded sound, then movies, all encoded onto physical objects.&#xA0; <br /> And finally about 100 years ago, the harnessing of electromagnetic spectrum to send sound and images through the air, radio and television. This is the media landscape as we knew it in the 20th century.&#xA0; <br /> But there is a curious asymmetry here. The media that is good at creating conversations is no good at creating groups. And that&apos;s good at creating groups is no good at creating conversations. If you want to have a conversation in this world, you have it with one other person. If you want to address a group, you get the same message and you give it to everybody in the group. Whether you&apos;re doing that with a broadcasting tower or a printing press. That was the media landscape as we had it in the twentieth century.&#xA0; <br /> Then something changed. This thing that looks like a peacock hit a windscreen&#xA0;is Bill Cheswick&apos;s map of the Internet.&#xA0;He traces the edges of the individual networks&#xA0;and then color codes them.&#xA0; <br /> The Internet is the first medium in history that has native support for groups and conversation at the same time. Where as the phone gave us the one to one pattern. And television, radio, magazines, books, gave us the one to many pattern. The Internet gives us the many to many pattern. For the first time media is natively good at supporting these kinds of conversations. &#xA0;
  • There are only four periods in the last 500 years where media has changed enough to qualify for the label Revolution.&#xA0; <br /> The first one is the famous one, the printing press. Movable type, oil-based inks, that whole complex of innovations that made printing possible and turned Europe upside-down, starting in the middle of the 1400s.&#xA0; <br /> Then a couple of hundred years ago there was innovation in two way communication. Conversational media, first the telegraph, then the telephone. Slow, text based conversations, then real-time voice based conversations.&#xA0; <br /> Then, about 150 years ago, there was a revolution in recorded media other than print. First photos, then recorded sound, then movies, all encoded onto physical objects.&#xA0; <br /> And finally about 100 years ago, the harnessing of electromagnetic spectrum to send sound and images through the air, radio and television. This is the media landscape as we knew it in the 20th century.&#xA0; <br /> But there is a curious asymmetry here. The media that is good at creating conversations is no good at creating groups. And that&apos;s good at creating groups is no good at creating conversations. If you want to have a conversation in this world, you have it with one other person. If you want to address a group, you get the same message and you give it to everybody in the group. Whether you&apos;re doing that with a broadcasting tower or a printing press. That was the media landscape as we had it in the twentieth century.&#xA0; <br /> Then something changed. This thing that looks like a peacock hit a windscreen&#xA0;is Bill Cheswick&apos;s map of the Internet.&#xA0;He traces the edges of the individual networks&#xA0;and then color codes them.&#xA0; <br /> The Internet is the first medium in history that has native support for groups and conversation at the same time. Where as the phone gave us the one to one pattern. And television, radio, magazines, books, gave us the one to many pattern. The Internet gives us the many to many pattern. For the first time media is natively good at supporting these kinds of conversations. &#xA0;
  • There are only four periods in the last 500 years where media has changed enough to qualify for the label Revolution.&#xA0; <br /> The first one is the famous one, the printing press. Movable type, oil-based inks, that whole complex of innovations that made printing possible and turned Europe upside-down, starting in the middle of the 1400s.&#xA0; <br /> Then a couple of hundred years ago there was innovation in two way communication. Conversational media, first the telegraph, then the telephone. Slow, text based conversations, then real-time voice based conversations.&#xA0; <br /> Then, about 150 years ago, there was a revolution in recorded media other than print. First photos, then recorded sound, then movies, all encoded onto physical objects.&#xA0; <br /> And finally about 100 years ago, the harnessing of electromagnetic spectrum to send sound and images through the air, radio and television. This is the media landscape as we knew it in the 20th century.&#xA0; <br /> But there is a curious asymmetry here. The media that is good at creating conversations is no good at creating groups. And that&apos;s good at creating groups is no good at creating conversations. If you want to have a conversation in this world, you have it with one other person. If you want to address a group, you get the same message and you give it to everybody in the group. Whether you&apos;re doing that with a broadcasting tower or a printing press. That was the media landscape as we had it in the twentieth century.&#xA0; <br /> Then something changed. This thing that looks like a peacock hit a windscreen&#xA0;is Bill Cheswick&apos;s map of the Internet.&#xA0;He traces the edges of the individual networks&#xA0;and then color codes them.&#xA0; <br /> The Internet is the first medium in history that has native support for groups and conversation at the same time. Where as the phone gave us the one to one pattern. And television, radio, magazines, books, gave us the one to many pattern. The Internet gives us the many to many pattern. For the first time media is natively good at supporting these kinds of conversations. &#xA0;
  • Media and platform convergence
  • Technology is no longer outside, no longer alien, no longer at the periphery. It is at the center of our lives. "Technology is the campfire around which we gather," says musician/artist Laurie Anderson. For many decades high tech was marginal in presence. Then suddenly--blink--it is everywhere and all-important. Technology has been able to infiltrate into our lives to the degree it has because it has become more like us. It&apos;s become organic in structure. Because network technology behaves more like an organism than like a machine, biological metaphors are far more useful than mechanical ones in understanding how the network economy runs.
  • We carry in our pockets computers which are a million times more powerful that computers which 20 years ago were as large as a building. DO we think about that, do we concern ourselves with it? No, we&#x2019;re always moving forward.
  • the ways we sense the world <br /> relationship between the body and electronic technology in the twenty-first century <br /> The thing that&#x2019;s &#x2013; I liken all of this to the Internet nervous system, that we now have kind of a sensorium that is much larger than our personal sensorium. It&#x2019;s kind of a more of a global sensorium and things like Twitter give us feelers everywhere. But just as &#x2013; you have to think about what you get through your sensorium before you leap to a conclusion, we have to learn, just because it&#x2019;s in print doesn&#x2019;t mean it&#x2019;s somehow valid or magically true so we&#x2019;re just learning. But it is ultimately beneficial. <br /> It&#x2019;s very different; imagine if all of a sudden &#x2013; it&#x2019;s almost like a comic book. You know you&#x2019;re like a comic book hero, all of a sudden your senses were suddenly extended globally and you&#x2019;re suddenly hearing everything and seeing everything at once. Initially, we had that initial reaction a few years ago, it&#x2019;s all too much. Now, we&#x2019;re getting better at filtering it; we&#x2019;re using intermediaries like Twitter, curating. So we&#x2019;re starting &#x2013; we still are seeing much more and much more instantaneously which I think we&#x2019;re dealing with it pretty well in fact.
  • the ways we sense the world <br /> relationship between the body and electronic technology in the twenty-first century <br /> The thing that&#x2019;s &#x2013; I liken all of this to the Internet nervous system, that we now have kind of a sensorium that is much larger than our personal sensorium. It&#x2019;s kind of a more of a global sensorium and things like Twitter give us feelers everywhere. But just as &#x2013; you have to think about what you get through your sensorium before you leap to a conclusion, we have to learn, just because it&#x2019;s in print doesn&#x2019;t mean it&#x2019;s somehow valid or magically true so we&#x2019;re just learning. But it is ultimately beneficial. <br /> It&#x2019;s very different; imagine if all of a sudden &#x2013; it&#x2019;s almost like a comic book. You know you&#x2019;re like a comic book hero, all of a sudden your senses were suddenly extended globally and you&#x2019;re suddenly hearing everything and seeing everything at once. Initially, we had that initial reaction a few years ago, it&#x2019;s all too much. Now, we&#x2019;re getting better at filtering it; we&#x2019;re using intermediaries like Twitter, curating. So we&#x2019;re starting &#x2013; we still are seeing much more and much more instantaneously which I think we&#x2019;re dealing with it pretty well in fact.
  • what we do, and what our obsessions are
  • the media environment of our youth as related to food. you had a monpoly provider on the left be it rupert murdoch or the bbc. on the right you have the consumer, pathetically grateful for any thing you give it. nowadays the user is involved.
  • In reality virtually every new medium/technology that has landed has encouraged a wider take-up and use. Recorded sound was meant to be the death of music. Video was meant to be the end of the film industry. The list goes on.&#xA0;
  • the ways we sense the world <br /> relationship between the body and electronic technology in the twenty-first century
  • the ways we sense the world <br /> relationship between the body and electronic technology in the twenty-first century
  • TED 1) Everything that&#x2019;s already in the world when you&#x2019;re born is just normal <br /> <br /> 2) Anything that gets invented between then and before you turn thirty is incredibly exciting and creative and with any luck you can make a career out of it <br /> <br /> 3) Anything that gets invented after you&#x2019;re thirty is against the natural order of things and the beginning of the end of civilisation as we know it until it&#x2019;s been around for about ten years when it gradually turns out to be alright really.
  • TED 1) Everything that&#x2019;s already in the world when you&#x2019;re born is just normal <br /> <br /> 2) Anything that gets invented between then and before you turn thirty is incredibly exciting and creative and with any luck you can make a career out of it <br /> <br /> 3) Anything that gets invented after you&#x2019;re thirty is against the natural order of things and the beginning of the end of civilisation as we know it until it&#x2019;s been around for about ten years when it gradually turns out to be alright really.

People, Technology and Advertising People, Technology and Advertising Presentation Transcript

  • PEOPLE TECHNOLOGY & ADVERTISING
  • AGENCY REPUBLIC. REPUBLIC
  • AGENCY REPUBLIC. REPUBLIC View slide
  • DIGITAL AGENCY OF THE YEAR 5 OF THE LAST 7 YEARS View slide
  • We’ve developed the UK’s fastest growing and largest sponsored group on Facebook and the largest sponsored UK YouTube channel
  • TIM SPARKE. digital coach /strategy
  • TECHNOLOGY ADVERTISING PEOPLE
  • "The farther back you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see."   W.Churchill
  • GLOBAL, UBIQUITOUS & FREE.
  • "Technology is the campfire around which we gather" Laurie Anderson
  • BC BG
  • 9-5 = PRODUCER 6-9 = CONSUMER Social Media Counter
  • 9-5 = PRODUCER 6-9 = CONSUMER USER. Social Media Counter
  • WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR ADVERTISING?
  • WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR ADVERTISING? PROTOTYPE CADBURYS GOOGLE SPRINT MILLION NYC AXION WHOPPER WARIO RED BULL
  • So what about us?
  • 4 Hour Work Week
  • What’s next?
  • INTERNET GOLDEN AGE
  • GOLDEN AGE
  • GOLDEN AGE MOBILE
  • Bringing down all the resources of the internet out of cyberspace and into reality Mobile phones are like the billion roofing nails that tie the cloud down to earth.
  • Just like ordinary reality Flickr: wvs
  • Only more so Flickr: wvs
  • AR finishes what the internet started
  • Shopsavvy
  • •Who do I know here?
  • •Who do I know here? •Where do I know them from?
  • •Who do I know here? •Where do I know them from? •Who should I get to know?
  • •Who do I know here? •Where do I know them from? •Who should I get to know? •Who here is single?
  • WHAT CAN YOU DO?
  • "In times of change learners inherit the earth; while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists. " Eric Hoffer
  • "In times of change learners inherit the earth; while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists. " Eric Hoffer "We are perishing for want of wonder, not for want of wonders." G K Chesterton
  • THA ? NKS @sparkey www.sparkelife.com tim.sparke@agencyrepublic.com