Skills for Impact Paul Fletcher
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Skills for Impact Paul Fletcher

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  • What do we know about good or better T, L & A from our inspections? Key point is the focus on learning in a productive atmosphere; everyone in the provider is learner-centred and focused on ensuring they achieve qualifications and develop as individuals in their broadest sense for their future
  • What do we know about good or better T, L & A from our inspections? Key point is the focus on learning in a productive atmosphere; everyone in the provider is learner-centred and focused on ensuring they achieve qualifications and develop as individuals in their broadest sense for their future
  • What do we know about good or better T, L & A from our inspections? Key point is the focus on learning in a productive atmosphere; everyone in the provider is learner-centred and focused on ensuring they achieve qualifications and develop as individuals in their broadest sense for their future
  • What do we know about good or better T, L & A from our inspections? Key point is the focus on learning in a productive atmosphere; everyone in the provider is learner-centred and focused on ensuring they achieve qualifications and develop as individuals in their broadest sense for their future

Skills for Impact Paul Fletcher Skills for Impact Paul Fletcher Presentation Transcript

  • 26 June 2013 South West Forum Group How impact measurement relates to and supports quality improvement Paul Fletcher Senior HMI
  • How impact measurement relates to and supports quality improvement The Context The Common Inspection Framework as an improvement tool Tools used on Prepared for Inspection to Promote quality improvement
  • Local Accountability Survey – March 13 - Findings  Overall, the government’s policy to deregulate the curriculum for the learning and skills sector has been well received […], but systems to measure the impact of these changes are insufficiently robust.  One year after the policy was introduced, [providers] did not have sufficient evidence to determine the extent of the impact of any changes they had made to their provision on reducing youth unemployment and supporting local economic growth. Most [..]had not monitored these changes rigorously enough. View slide
  • Local Accountability Survey – March 13 - Findings  Destination data were generally not sufficiently complete for managers to evaluate fully the impact of these programmes on supporting learners into work.  Managers and governors did not fully evaluate their work with, and its impact on, local communities and employers. A lack of coherent, consistent sector-wide measures of all learners’ destinations, and systems to track their progression over time, hampered the [..] ability to demonstrate how effectively they developed learners’ wider skills and supported their progression to sustainable employment.  The lack of consistent, sector-wide measures of learners’ progression, including into sustainable employment, has hindered [the] ability to evaluate the wider impact of their [..] work in the local area. View slide
  • The Common Inspection Framework (CIF)  The evaluation schedule is provider and context specific  Forms the basis of self-assessment  Explicit Impact Measures - data  Implicit Impact Measures – soft measures  Outcomes  Teaching, learning and assessment  Leadership and management
  • Outcomes for Learners  All learners achieve and make progress relative to their starting points and learning goals  Achievement gaps are narrowing between different groups of learners  Learners develop personal, social, and employability skills  Learners progress to courses leading to higher-level qualifications and into jobs that meet local and national needs
  • Defining Outcomes – What Ofsted means by outcomes Achievement       How well learners do overall taking into account their success rates, progress made, skill acquisition and development, standard of work and progression. Progress       The rate of learning and acquisition of knowledge and skills leading to the achievement of challenging targets, such as the level or grade.   Starting points       Learners’ prior attainment in terms of previous qualifications or skill level when they begin their course or programme of study. Learning goals       Learners’ main qualification, group of qualifications or agreed learning aim(s), if not on an accredited programme, including the level at which these are to be achieved. Achievement gap     The percentage point gap between the success rate of one group and another, such as age, gender, ethnicity and disability.
  • Defining Outcomes – What Ofsted means by outcomes Personal and social skills       The development of learners’ understanding of rights and responsibilities, their moral and cultural awareness and understanding of utilising resources in a sustainable way. Employability skills       The development of English, mathematics, functional and broader skills, such as leadership, teamwork and problem solving, to enable learners to progress to higher-level courses, and to employment and further training.
  • Defining Outcomes – What Ofsted means by outcomes RARPA     Recognising and recording progress and achievement for non- accredited learning for adults such as in ACL provision, eg upholstery Internal progression     When learners progress from one level to the next within the same provider. Destinations     Where learners go when they leave the provider. Job outcome payments     Relates to courses for the unemployed where part of the payment a provider receives relates to a learner gaining a job even if they leave before achieving the learning aim.
  • Using learner-level data for quality improvement – the learner’s journey  Applications and recruitment  Initial assessment  Attendance  Progress  Assessment  At-risk learners  Retention  Achievement  Progression
  • Using learner-level data for quality improvement  Symptom?  Cause?  Effect?
  • Using learner-level data for quality improvement Area of provision for investigat ion: Compare the: with the: Quality Improvement Questions: Interpretation should be indicative to your provision Progress 1 rate of progress of individual learners expected rate of progress of individual learners by subject area (or sub-area) What can the comparison tell you about: •your success in closing the ‘achievement gap’? •the thoroughness and accuracy of your initial assessment procedures? •the effectiveness of your review system for determining whether or not learners are progressing at the rate set out in their individual learning plans? •the sufficiency of the detail in your individual learning plans to be able to show a clear attainment plan? •your learners’ awareness of their relative progress rate? •the adequacy and relevance of the learner support you provide? •the support your learners are receiving from their employers? What is your progress-rate trigger figure for determining whether or not a learner is falling into an ‘at-risk’ category? What changes could you make to improve your provision? Project no. 4 - Learners’ Progress
  • Using learner-level data for quality improvement These data projects are available at www.excellencegateway.org.uk > Good Practice Database > Discussion Tools. You are welcome to use this information and adapt it for use within your organisation. Please do not use this information outside your organisation and always acknowledge the source.
  • Ends