Routes to Solidarity Project - supporting ethnic minority women in their struggles, and aspirations
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  • Government office’s equality fact sheets very clearly states that.. Inequality exists starting from gender pay to representation at any level
  • Decisions that affect local communities and the services they receive are increasingly being taken at a local level. There has been a real emphasises on the importance of community involvement in local decision-making It also places greater importance on Local Strategic Partnerships (LSPs) and Local Area Agreement (LAA) to deliver services. Where are the women on LSPs? 28% of Chairs of central LSPs boards More likely to be community representatives, thematic partnership representatives or administrators on central LSP boards. What women’s issues are being raised? Teenage pregnancy and domestic violence No awareness that all issues have a gender perspective Are LSPs engaging with women’s organisations? In VCS total 7% Women’s organisations but on LSPs only 1.8% representation significantly under-represented How are LSPs supporting women’s representation? 72% of LSPs surveyed did not provide any specific support for women to engage .
  • 2/5th of Asian and Black women live in poverty 74% of Bangladeshi, 59% of Pakistanis and 28% of Indian children grow up in poverty 70% of all BME communities live in the 88 most deprived local authority Only two MPs are Black and there has never been an Asian women MP no Black female chief constable and no BME judges BME women has around 50% employment rate – part time/ temporary contracts- 4 times more qualified for the job Black African, Bangladeshi and Pakistani women are 3 times more likely to be unemployed 85% BME women work from home , gender pay gap- Pakistani and Bangaladeshi women earn lowest salaries – 56% of average white men Only 8% Bangladeshi / Pakistani women has occupational pension, 1% have personal pension 30% BME population eligible for benefits do not receive them, child benefit - larger family e.g. Bangladeshi and Pakistani families are affected BME women are less likely to hold financial products , face financial exclusion and financial abuse and BME parents have less access to maternity pay and flexible working options 45% of women in the Uk face domestic violence At this rate it will be another 300 years before BME women achieve numerical equality of political representation.
  • 2/5th of Asian and Black women live in poverty 74% of Bangladeshi, 59% of Pakistanis and 28% of Indian children grow up in poverty 70% of all BME communities live in the 88 most deprived local authority Only two MPs are Black and there has never been an Asian women MP no Black female chief constable and no BME judges BME women has around 50% employment rate – part time/ temporary contracts- 4 times more qualified for the job Black African, Bangladeshi and Pakistani women are 3 times more likely to be unemployed 85% BME women work from home , gender pay gap- Pakistani and Bangaladeshi women earn lowest salaries – 56% of average white men Only 8% Bangladeshi / Pakistani women has occupational pension, 1% have personal pension 30% BME population eligible for benefits do not receive them, child benefit - larger family e.g. Bangladeshi and Pakistani families are affected BME women are less likely to hold financial products , face financial exclusion and financial abuse and BME parents have less access to maternity pay and flexible working options 45% of women in the Uk face domestic violence At this rate it will be another 300 years before BME women achieve numerical equality of political representation.
  • Discrimination Male dominated spaces - Gender not taken into account Value of BME women ’ s organisations Lack of funding and basic resources skill and competency Lack of information, opportunity, contacts links and voice to influence policies Leadership challenges BME Women challenging within community and wider society BME women ’ s groups are not a homogeneous group Rise of faith agenda Mainstreaming of equalities: value of specialist services
  • Fauzia Chaudhry and Uzma provided testimonies from Fatima Women’s Association to Equalities and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) triennial review
  • Fauzia Chaudhry and Uzma provided testimonies from Fatima Women’s Association to Equalities and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) triennial review

Routes to Solidarity Project - supporting ethnic minority women in their struggles, and aspirations Routes to Solidarity Project - supporting ethnic minority women in their struggles, and aspirations Presentation Transcript

  • Routes to Solidarity Project supporting ethnic minority women in their struggles, and aspirations Archana Choksi and Sandhya Sharma : Project Officers Supported by:
  • Why women?
    • Women are under represented in all areas of public life .
    • Politics
    • 21.4 (1.9%increase)
    • 30.8% local councillors
    • Public appointments
    • 32.6%
    • Public Sector
    • 12% - senior police officers
    • 20.1% - local authority chief executives
  • Women’s representation in local decision making
    • Urban Forum, Oxfam and Women ’ s Resource Centre (WRC) research:
    • Where are the women on Local Strategic Partnerships (LSPs)?
    • What women ’ s issues are being raised?
    • Are LSPs engaging with women ’ s organisations?
    • How are LSPs supporting women ’ s representation?
  • Where are BME women?
    • 40% of BME women Live in Poverty in UK
    • 74% of Bangladeshi, 59% of Pakistanis and 28% of Indian children grow up in poverty
    • BME women’s representation in public and political life:
    • 8 BME female MPs (total 26 –4.6%)
    • 6.9% - public appointments
    • 0.8% - Local Councillors
  • Where are BME women?
    • Despite major developments*,
    • nine major pieces of discrimination legislation
    • around 100 statutory instruments and
    • more than 2500 pages of guidance and statutory codes of practice
    • BME women in the UK are
    • Poor, Powerless and Passed Over
    * (e.g. Sex Discrimination Act, the legislation of abortion, criminalisation of rape in marriage, Domestic Violence: Break the Chain, Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act, Gender equality duty, gender equality, gender main streaming, indirect discrimination, NAPs, Equality Bill, creation of Commission for Equality and Human Rights, Voices 4 change….)
  • Why?
    • Multiple discrimination
    • Politics of fragmentation
    • Policy impact on the sector – prevent, community cohesion
    • Lack of strategic approach to development of the sector
  • Can BME women influence policy? Strategic leaders’ board Yorkshire forward Joint regional board Spatial planning Regeneration and housing Works and skills Transport Hull & Humber ports city region North Yorkshire Leeds city region Sheffield city region Local authorities Neighbourehood and communities Leeds Initiative assembly Leeds Initiative executive Going up a league board Narrowing the gap Leeds strategic plan Strategy and development Children Leeds, Harmonious communities, Neighbourhood policy BME communities BME women National Policy Delivery Children’s integrated strategy board Healthy Leeds, Safer stronger Legi board, Resource board VCFS infrastructure organisations Consultation /representati structureson Independent board
    • “ One of the biggest barriers historically has been that BME women have never actually been seen as either having a voice or wanting to have a voice, its strange because I really feel that people never thought that black women wanted to change the world” -
    Amina Lone (activist and RTS participant)
  • Outcomes :
    • Women have improved knowledge/understanding of their rights, and exercise greater leadership in economic, social and political spaces
    • Increased capacity of BME groups to work together to influence decisions that impact on their work, and their service users at a local, regional and national level
    • Policy-makers at different levels are better informed, and put in place policy solutions that benefit BME communities in England
  • Routes to solidarity Activities
    • Training
    • Mentoring
    • Lobbying
    • Policy conference
    • Policy Round tables
    • Briefing papers
    • Community cohesion projects
  • Progress so far….
    • .. there was a magnetic connection from the very first day…. the spirit that was there, the oneness, the commonness of what women were doing; it gave me some life back…it was like an awakening. I realised that yes, I am a true activist, but I hadn’t realised this until the training
    • (RTS trained 59 women / women’s organisations (22)
    • Routes to solidarity is about space….its women taking a risk saying that we still believe in a sense of solidarity and working together..
    • (BME women’s solidarity forum/ NE BME women’s network)
  • Progress so far…. (cont)
    • I feel like I have really done something…we have gone directly to national powers, we have gone higher to bring change and to voice women’s needs”
    • (testimonies to EHRC triennial review)
    • We can no longer sit on the margins, we have to sit on boards… take strategic roles
    • (BME regional Policy Forum)
  • Project contact details:
    • Kirit Patel, Race Equality Programme Co-ordinator: 0161 860 2815 kpatel@oxfam.org.uk
    • Archana Choksi, Project Officer (Leeds): 07879 115 502 [email_address]
    • Fiona Davison, Business Support Officer: 0161 860 2811 [email_address]
    Supported by: